Home > Events & News > Brown Bag Schedule . Archive

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Stern, Novak, Harlow, and colleagues say compensation due Californians forcibly sterilized under eugenics laws

Burgard and Seelye find job insecurity linked to psychological distress among workers in later years

Former PSC trainee Jay Borchert parlays past incarceration and doctoral degree into pursuing better treatment of inmates

More News

Highlights

Savolainen wins Outstanding Contribution Award for study of how employment affects recidivism among past criminal offenders

Giving Blueday at ISR focuses on investing in the next generation of social scientists

Pfeffer and Schoeni cover the economic and social dimensions of wealth inequality in this special issue

PRB Policy Communication Training Program for PhD students in demography, reproductive health, population health

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
H. Luke Shaefer

Institute for Social Research MLK 2001 Event

Collecting and Interpreting Race and Ethnicity Data:
Census 2000 and Beyond

An Institute for Social Research and Department of Sociology
Event in Celebration of Martin Luther King Day
January 15, 2001, 1 - 4 pm
Institute for Social Research, room 6050

The 2000 Census marked a revolutionary change in how the U.S. government measures race. For the first time, people were allowed to identify with more than one racial group. The effects of this change will be felt by data analysts, policy makers, litigants, and everyday folks. Please join us for an MLK Day event exploring why this change occurred, how this new data can be understood, and alternative methods of measuring race.

Speakers:

Opening Remarks
David Featherman, Director, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan
Session 1:
"Why Were Guidelines for the Federal Collection of Race and Ethnicity Data Revised?" Congressman Thomas Sawyer, U.S. House of Representatives, Kim Williams, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.
Session 2:
"How Will We Use the New Race and Ethnicity Data?" Ann Morning, Department of Sociology and Office of Population Research, Princeton University
Session 3:
"What Kind of Race and Ethnicity Data Should We Be Collecting?" David Harris, Department of Sociology and ISR, University of Michigan; Discussants: Reynolds Farley, Department of Sociology and ISR, University of Michigan, Elizabeth Cole, Women's Studies and Center for Afro-American and African Studies, University of Michigan
Small Discussion Groups Led by Presenters