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Novak, Geronimus, and Martinez-Cardoso find fear of immigration can affect Latino birth outcomes

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

story art

Farley looks at why so many Michigan metro areas have fallen into emergency-manager status

a PSC In The News reference, 2014

"Emergency managers in black-majority cities reflect growing income gap" - The Bridge. 01/22/2014.

In this op ed, Reynolds Farley discusses the historical slide into disadvantage that has caused some majority-black Michigan municipalities to lose local governance. He says that places like Benton Harbor, Detroit, Flint, Highland Park, Inkster, Pontiac, Buena Vista, and Muskegon Heights, which all have had emergency managers appointed, have signed consent agreements, and/or have lost local control of their school systems in recent years, are hampered by the declining incomes of blacks. Looking at the years since the Civil Rights Movement, Farley says: "The troubling fact is that the economic status of the average African-American resident of Michigan is much less favorable now than it was in 1970."

Researcher:

Reynolds Farley

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