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Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Axinn says new data on campus rape will "allow students to see for themselves the full extent of this problem"

Frey says white population is growing in Detroit and other large cities


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

psc brown bag iconReevaluating the Causes of the Baby Boom: The Effects of Electrification in the United States, 1925 to 1960

Martha Bailey (Department of Economics, University of Michigan)

01/14/2008, at noon in room 6050 ISR-Thompson.

A half century after its peak, the ultimate causes of the baby boom remain a matter of debate among demographers and economists. In a highly influential article Greenwood, Seshadri, and Vandenbrouke (2005) argue that improvements in household production technologies effectively lowered the cost of raising children, which, in turn, caused the baby boom. This paper provides a comprehensive empirical examination of this model. Using newly-compiled (1) county-level data on electrification, appliance ownership and family size and (2) annual, state-level data on the diffusion of electricity and completed childbearing, neither time series nor multivariate regression analysis reveals evidence of a positive impact of household appliances on childbearing decisions. Moreover, we document that the Amish experienced a rise in mid-century fertility, although they did not use electricity or modern appliances. Taken together, our results provide no support for the claim that appliance diffusion caused fertility to rise during the baby boom era.

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