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Kruger says reports of phantom mobile phone ringing/vibrating more common among anxious

Stafford says too early to say whether stock market declines will curtail Americans' spending

Eisenberg says many colleges now train campus personnel to spot and refer troubled college students

Highlights

Call for papers: Conference on Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences, Oct 21-22, 2016, CU-Boulder

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

psc brown bag iconSocial Isolation, Gender and Inflammation

Linda Waite (Department of Sociology, University of Chicago)

11/04/2008, at noon in room 6050 ISR-Thompson.

Jointly sponsored by PSC and SRC. Tuesday, 12-2 pm.

Social isolation has been linked to poor mental and physical health and mortality, but we know little about the physiological processes that underlie this association. This paper examines one important potential pathway between social isolation and health. The stress response leads to short-run increases in blood pressure that may damage arterial walls in the long-run, leading to hypertension and inflammation. Inflammation is now thought to be a root cause of a number of diseases, especially cardiovascular disease. We use data from the 2005-6 National Social Life, Health and Aging Study, to model the effect of key dimensions of social isolation on systolic blood pressure and C-Reactive Protein, a marker of inflammation. We also model effects of isolation through several measures of emotional well-being and through health behaviors, and assess gender differences in these relationships. We look especially for gender differences in the stress response and the inflammation process to test the notion that while “fight or flight” describes the stress response for males, “tend and befriend” is more accurate for females.


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