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Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

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Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

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Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

psc brown bag iconFamily Instability, Genes, and Children’s Externalizing Behavior

Colter Mitchell (Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University)

02/13/2012, at noon in room 6050 ISR-Thompson.

This study examines whether the relationship between biological-parent relationship stability and children’s externalizing behavior is moderated by child’s genetic make-up. Based on biological susceptibility theory, we hypothesize that children with particular gene variants are more responsive to changes in family structure than children without such variants. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we find that both serotonergic and dopaminergic genes interact with biological-father residential change to influence trajectories in child’s externalizing behaviors. Children with more reactive genotypes experience a greater benefit to their father entering the household than other children; they also experience a greater cost to their father exiting the household. These gene-social environment interactions are stronger when they occur in early childhood, and they are more pronounced for boys than for girls. The findings suggest that including biological information in our models of social phenomena can improve our understanding of the latter.


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