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Owen-Smith says universities must demonstrate value of higher education

Armstrong says USC's removal of questions from a required Title IX training module may reflect student-administration relations

Fomby finds living with step- or half-siblings linked to higher aggression among 5 year olds

Highlights

PRB training program in policy communication for pre-docs. Application deadline, 2.28.2016

Call for proposals: PSID small grants for research on life course impacts on later life wellbeing

PSC News, fall 2015 now available

Barbara Anderson appointed chair of Census Scientific Advisory Committee

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Feb 1 at noon, 6050 ISR-Thompson
Sarah Miller

psc brown bag iconChild Murder in America

Randolph Roth (Professor of History and Sociology, Ohio State University)

04/08/2013, at noon in room 6050 ISR-Thompson.

Archived video available

Child Murder in America is an interregional, internationally comparative study of homicides of and by children from colonial times to the present. Child Murder in America will argue that the causes of murders of children by parents or caregivers are quite different from the causes of murder among adults, although murders of children by other children or by unrelated adults appear to follow the same pattern as murders among adults. Rates for homicides among adults correlate most strongly with the feelings people have toward their government, the degree to which they identify with members of their own communities, and the opportunities they have to earn respect without resorting to violence. But rates of homicides of children by parents or caregivers correlate most strongly over time with demographic phenomena that are less volatile, such as the birth rate, life expectancy, and the likelihood of marriage. The research challenge at present is to determine whether homicides of children by parents or caregivers have the same correlates today that they did from the mid-sixteenth century into the early twentieth century.


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