Home > Events & News > Brown Bag Schedule . Archive

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Frey's Scenario F simulation mentioned in account of the Democratic Party's tribulations

U-M Poverty Solutions funds nine projects

Dynarski says NY's Excelsior Scholarship Program could crowd out low-income and minority students

More News

Highlights

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

2017 PAA Annual Meeting, April 27-29, Chicago

NIH funding opportunity: Etiology of Health Disparities and Health Advantages among Immigrant Populations (R01 and R21), open Jan 2017

Russell Sage 2017 Summer Institute in Computational Social Science, June 18-July 1. Application deadline Feb 17.

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Jan 23, 2017 at noon:
Decline of cash assistance and child well-being, Luke Shaefer

psc brown bag iconPerverse Consequences of Well-Intentioned Regulation: Evidence from India's Child Labor Ban

Prashant Bharadwaj (University of California, San Diego)

10/21/2013, 12:00:00, G150 A&B ISR - Perry

This presentation will not be streamed or archived.

While bans against child labor are a common policy tool, there is very little empirical evidence validating their effectiveness. Most of the existing literature evaluating the impact of child labor bans has been theoretical. In this paper we examine empirically the consequences of India's landmark legislation against child labor, the Child Labor (Prohibition and Regulation) Act of 1986. Using data from employment surveys conducted before and after the ban, and using age restrictions that determined whom the ban applied to, we show that child wages decrease and child labor increases after the ban. The increase appears to come mainly from families where the head is less educated, suggesting poverty as a key determinant of why families use child labor. These results are consistent with a theoretical model building on the seminal work of Basu and Van (1998) and Basu (2005), where families use child labor to reach subsistence constraints and where child wages decrease in response to bans, leading poor families to utilize more child labor.


  View All