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Spring 2015 PSC newletter available now

Formal demography workshop and conference at UC Berkeley, August 17-21

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psc brown bag iconEnvironmental determinants of Infectious diseases: Roads and diarrheal disease

Joe Eisenberg

03/24/2014, at noon in room 6050 ISR-Thompson.

Archived video

Dr. Eisenberg studies infectious disease epidemiology with a focus on waterborne and vectorborne diseases. His broad research interests integrates theoretical work in developing disease transmission models and empirical work in designing and conducting epidemiology studies. Specifically he has been interested in the environmental determinants of infectious diseases, and currently has a project in Ecuador studying how changes in the social and natural environment, mediated by road construction, affect the epidemiology of pathogens causing diarrheal diseases. Dr. Eisenberg also has an ongoing collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene group exploring how to integrate disease transmission models and multi-country survey data, to help inform regional and national decisions on public health policy making. Dr. Eisenberg's domestic interest has been focused on the development of a new microbial risk assessment framework that shifts the traditional approach of individual-based static models to population-based dynamic models. In coordination with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), this work has led him to apply these disease transmission models to assess the public health risk from exposures to microbial agents in drinking waters, recreational waters, and biosolids.


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