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Lam looks at population and development in next 15 years in UN commission keynote address

Mitchell et al. find harsh family environments may magnify disadvantage via impact on 'genetic architecture'

Frey says Arizona's political paradoxes explained in part by demography

Highlights

Raghunathan appointed director of Survey Research Center

PSC newsletter spring 2014 issue now available

Kusunoki wins faculty seed grant award from Institute for Research on Women and Gender

2014 PAA Annual Meeting, May 1-3, Boston

Next Brown Bag

Monday, April 21
Grant Miller: Managerial Incentives in Public Service Delivery

Elizabeth Eve Bruch photo

Email Address
734-763-3486
room: 2048

CV

Elizabeth Eve Bruch

Research Affiliate, Population Studies Center.

Research Fellow, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica.

Assistant Professor, Sociology.

Assistant Professor, Complex systems.

Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Bruch's current research explores how population levels of income inequality and individuals' residential mobility decisions generate patterns of neighborhood poverty.

Recent Publications

Journal Articles

Bruch, Elizabeth Eve. Forthcoming. "How Population Structure Shapes Neighborhood Segregation." American Journal of Sociology. NIHMSID: NIHMS551410.

Bruch, Elizabeth Eve, and Robert Mare. 2012. "Methodological issues in the analysis of residential preferences, residential mobility, and neighborhood change." Sociological Methodology, 42(1): 103-154. PMCID: PMC3591474. DOI. Abstract.

Bruch, Elizabeth Eve, and Robert D. Mare. 2009. "Preferences and Pathways to Segregation: Reply to Van de Rijt, Siegel, and Macy." American Journal of Sociology, 114(4): 1181-1198. DOI. Abstract. Public Access.

PSC Reports

Bruch, Elizabeth Eve, and Robert Denis Mare. 2011. "Methodological Issues in the Analysis of Residential Preferences and Residential Mobility." PSC Research Report No. 11-725. January 2011. Abstract. PDF.