Author Archive for ljridley

Who Still Smokes

Flowing Data has a new data visualization of smokers in 1994 and 2014 by gender, education, income, and race & origin.

Two decades out from the 1995 law in California, along with the known impact of smoking on one’s health, you’d think smoking rates would be way down. And you’d be right for many demographic groups, but for some, smoking is still the same as it ever was.

[The charts] show estimated percentage of adult smokers among different groups, for 1994 and 2014. Estimates are based on survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

NIA opportunities for research in health disparities and aging

The most recent post in Inside NIA underscores several ways they are working to enhance research in aging and health disparities. These include funding opportunities — Health Disparities and Alzheimer’s Disease (R01), Emerging Directions for Addressing Health Disparities in Alzheimer’s Disease (R03), and the administrative supplement program, “Aging Research to Address Health Disparities” — and a framework for future research.

Coding for Data Visualization

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data has 5 tips for for learning to code for visualization: “being able to code your own visualization carries its own benefits like flexibility, speed, and complete customization.”

ACA Implementation Reports

Since 2014, The ACA Implementation Network (of the Rockefeller Institute of SUNY, the Brookings Institution and the Fels Institute of Government of the University of Pennsylvania) has been producing state-wide reports to try to answer the following questions:

  • Who governs state health reform initiatives and activities?
  • What new federal-state and inter-agency relationships have developed under the ACA?
  • And how have states put the principal coverage-related policies into operation, and with what effects?

The state reports are available by clicking on the map at the Network’s website. There are also two region-wide reports: the Western Overview Report and the Southern Overview Report.

H/T Data Detectives

NIA 101: Overview of Grant Process

On June 14, Dr. Chyren Hunter, deputy director of the Division of Extramural Activities and NIA training officer, will be featured in an hour-long webinar explaining the process of applying for NIA funding.

Read more details here and register online here.

Immigration by Year and Country of Origin

This animated map shows immigration to the United States by year and country of origin:

From 1820 to 2013, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States. The interactive map below visualizes all of them based on their prior country of residence. The brightness of a country corresponds to its total migration to the U.S. at the given time.

Using Stata Effectively

Stata is holding three 2-day sessions for new users. Sessions are $950 with a 15% discount for group enrollments of three or more.

Description:

Become intimately familiar with all three components of Stata: data management, analysis, and graphics. This two-day course is aimed at both new Stata users and those who wish to learn techniques for efficient day-to-day use of Stata. Upon completion of the course, you will be able to use Stata efficiently for basic analyses and graphics. You will be able to do this in a reproducible manner, making collaborative changes and follow-up analyses much simpler. Finally, you will be able to make your datasets self-explanatory to your co-workers and yourself when using them in the future.

The May 24-25 and June 20-21 are in Washington, DC and the October 24-25 session is in Las Vegas.

Go to this site for more training courses.

Quiz: Attitudes About Marriage, Childbearing, and Sexual Behavior

Note: the report this quiz is from covers the years 2002, 2006-2010, and 2011-2013. The quiz is on 2011-2013 only (though wrong answers cover the other years).

Attitudes About Marriage, Childbearing, and Sexual Behavior, 2011-2013

What Happens in Neighborhoods with Sharply Rising Home Values

Emily Badger of Wonkblog looks what happens when a neighborhood — Bedford-Stuyvesant in Brooklyn, specifically — experiences a sharp increase in home values, but income remains the same.

What Is “Normal America”?

Jed Kolko looked the demographics of each U.S. metropolitan area and measured how demographically similar they are to the U.S. as a whole, based on age, educational attainment, and race and ethnicity: “But that sense that the normal America is out there somewhere in a hamlet where they can’t pronounce “Acela” is misplaced. In fact, it’s not in a small town at all.”