Author Archive for ljridley

Page 2 of 54

UM Now Has Access to IndiaStat

Via Jungwon Yang:

The University of Michigan Library is pleased to announce that we now access to Indiastat which is a database provides key statistics of India, including census, election, trade, education, health data and more.

To access the data, please click on a link called “IP Login” at the top of the main page.
We subscribe a single user option, so please remind users to logout when they finish to explore the data. ( If a current user does not use the database over 15 minutes, then Indiastat will automatically disconnect the accession of data).

Access IndiaStat here: http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/31254

Decomposition of Future Population Growth

From the UNFPA website:

The main objective of the decomposition tool is to provide evidence and analysis that countries can use to develop policies and programmes aimed to find a balance between demographic change and social, economic and environmental goals.

This program calculates the contributions of different demographic factors (wanted and un-wanted fertility, mortality, migration, and age structure) to population growth. It is based on the medium variant population projection of the United Nations from 2010 to 2050 for all countries and main regions.

Select a country or region from the window below to view the results of the decomposition tool. Move mouse over the figures to explore the interactive data content. Then read and download a report summarizing the results, methods, and policy implications.

Learn more and use the tool on the website.

Working Papers from the NBER

Could a Website Really Have Doomed the Health Exchanges? Multiple Equilibria, Initial Conditions and the Construction of the Fine
by Florian Scheuer, Kent Smetters #19835
Abstract; PDF

Short-run Effects of Job Loss on Health Conditions, Health Insurance, and Health Care Utilization
by Jessamyn Schaller, Ann Huff Stevens #19884
Abstract; PDF

A Macroeconomic Framework for Quantifying Systemic Risk
by Zhiguo He, Arvind Krishnamurthy #19885
Abstract; PDF

Does Female Empowerment Promote Economic Development?
by Matthias Doepke, Michele Tertilt #19888
Abstract; PDF

Health, Financial Incentives, and Early Retirement: Micro-Simulation Evidence for Germany
by Hendrik Juerges, Lars Thiel, Tabea Bucher-Koenen, Johannes Rausch, Morten Schuth, Axel Boersch-Supan #19889
Abstract; PDF

Scale and Skill in Active Management
by Lubos Pastor, Robert F. Stambaugh, Lucian A. Taylor #19891
Abstract; PDF

Divorce Risk, Wages, and Working Wives: A Quantitative Life-Cycle Analysis of Female Labor Force Participation
by Raquel Fernandez, Joyce C. Wong #19869
Abstract; PDF

Tobacco Control Campaign in Uruguay: Impact on Smoking Cessation during Pregnancy
by Jeffrey E. Harris, Ana Ines Balsa, Patricia Triunfo #19878
Abstract; PDF

The Economics of Online Postsecondary Education: MOOCs, Nonselective Education, and Highly Selective Education
by Caroline M. Hoxby #19816
Abstract; PDF

Marry Your Like: Assortative Mating and Income Inequality
by Jeremy Greenwood, Nezih Guner, Georgi Kocharkov, Cezar Santos #19829
Abstract; PDF

Working Papers from the NBER

Urban Population and Amenities
by David Albouy, Bryan Stuart #19919
Abstract; PDF

Driving to Opportunity: Local Rents, Wages, Commuting Costs and Sub-Metropolitan Quality of Life
by David Albouy, Bert Lue #19922
Abstract; PDF

The Economics of Human Development and Social Mobility
by James J. Heckman, Stefano Mosso #19925
Abstract; PDF

Adjusting Body Mass for Measurement Error with Invalid Validation Data
by Charles Courtemanche, Joshua C. Pinkston, Jay Stewart #19928
Abstract; PDF

Retirement Security in an Aging Society
by James M. Poterba #19930
Abstract; PDF

The Labor Market Effects of Reducing Undocumented Immigrants
by Andri Chassamboulli, Giovanni Peri #19932
Abstract; PDF

The Demise of U.S. Economic Growth: Restatement, Rebuttal, and Reflections
by Robert J. Gordon #19895
Abstract; PDF

The Role of Health in Retirement
by Alan L. Gustman, Thomas L. Steinmeier #19902
Abstract; PDF

Regulatory Redistribution in the Market for Health Insurance
by Jeffrey Clemens #19904
Abstract; PDF

Collaborating With People Like Me: Ethnic co-authorship within the US
by Richard B. Freeman, Wei Huang #19905
Abstract; PDF

Men of Color and Community Colleges

By: Katherine Mangan
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

Minority Male Students Face Challenge to Achieve at Community Colleges

Although black and Latino male students enter community colleges with higher aspirations than those of their white peers, white men are six times as likely to graduate in three years with a certificate or degree, according to a report released on Wednesday by the Center for Community College Student Engagement at the University of Texas here.

Full text of the article

Aspirations to Achievement: Report from the Center for Community College Student Engagement (PDF)

Minimum Wage and Migration

By: Kirk Johnson
Source: New York Times

In the nation’s debate about the minimum wage, which President Obama has proposed increasing at the federal level to $10.10 from $7.25, this rolling borderland of onion farms and strip malls provides a test tube of sorts for observing how the minimum wage works in daily life, and how differences in the rate can affect a local economy in sometimes unexpected ways.

Read the full story at the New York Times

The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the U.S.

Source: The Equality of Opportunity Project
By: Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez, Nicholas Turner

From website:

Is America the “Land of Opportunity”? In two recent studies, we find that: (1) Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families. (2) Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries.

Executive Summary (PDF) | NBER Working Paper (PDF)
New York Times Interactive Map | Washington Post Interactive Map

Related: A new survey from Pew Research Center and USA Today finds that 65% of adults believe the gap between the rich and and everyone else has grown, but disagree on government intervention.
Pew Research Press Release | Pew Research Report (PDF) | Questionnaire (PDF)
USA Today Story

U.S. income inequality, on rise for decades, is now highest since 1928

by: Drew DeSilver
Source: Pew Research Center, FactTank

From article:

President Obama took on a topic yesterday that most Americans don’t like to talk about much: inequality. There are a lot of ways to measure economic inequality (and we’ll be discussing more on Fact Tank), but one basic approach is to look at how much income flows to groups at different steps on the economic ladder.

Full text

See also: Americans see growing gap between rich and poor

Population ageing: the timebomb that isn’t?

In the November 12, 2013 issue of the British Medical Journal “Jeroen Spijker and John MacInnes argue that current measures of population ageing are misleading and that the numbers of dependent older people in the UK and other countries have actually been falling in recent years.”

Read the full text here.

Labor Force Characteristics by Race and Ethnicity, 2012

Bureau of Labor Statistics Report, October 2013 (PDF):

In 2012, the unemployment rate for the United States was 8.1 percent; however, the rate varied across race and ethnicity groups. The rates were highest for Blacks (13.8 percent) and for American Indians and Alaska Natives (12.3 percent) and lowest for Asians (5.9 percent) and for Whites (7.2 percent). The jobless rate was 10.3 percent for Hispanics, 11.8 percent for Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders, and 11.9 percent for people of Two or More Races.

Differences in labor force characteristics emerge when the race and ethnicity groups are compared. These differences reflect a variety of factors, not all of which are measurable. These factors include variations across the groups in educational attainment; the occupations and industries in which the groups work; the geographic areas of the country in which the groups are concentrated, including whether they tend to reside in urban or rural settings; and the degree of discrimination encountered in the workplace.

See also: The Workforce Is Even More Divided by Race Than you Think in The Atlantic.