Author Archive for ljridley

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Public Opinion on Abortion

The Pew Research Center recently did a survey on abortion. Views have remained quite stable for the last 20 years: in 1995, 60% of Americans believed abortion should be legal in most cases and 38% believed it should be illegal, and in 2016, 56% believe it should be legal and 41% believe it should be illegal.

Twitter and Public Health

The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences blog highlighted research by Ann Marie White and Melanie Funchess on the use of “Twitter data to prevent violence and suicide through community-based helping networks.”

Their recent BSSR talk, “To tweet or not to tweet: Community-based participatory research approaches to advance wellness and violence prevention via social media,” highlighted their progress in developing community-based helping networks that take advantage of social media tools to improve public health in their neighborhoods.

Quiz! Employment of Young Boomers

Note: This quiz refers only to people born between 1957 and 1964 from age 18 to 48.

Employment of Young Boomers

Changing Causes of Death in Poor Countries

The World Bank has a new interactive chart showing how the leading causes of death are changing worldwide:

From The DataBlog:

Worldwide, the leading causes of death are changing, and they vary between rich and poor countries. In low-income countries, deaths from communicable diseases such as malaria and HIV/AIDS have fallen, while deaths from non-communicable diseases such as stroke and diabetes are on the rise.

Data USA

Data USA is a collaboration between Deloitte, Macro Connections at the MIT Media Lab, and Datawheel which is (according to their About page), “the most comprehensive website and visualization engine of public US Government data.” The data is pulled from sources such as the American Community Survey, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the visualizations are powered by D3plus, an open source visualization engine.

H/T Flowing Data

Quiz: Demographic Trends

Demographic trends

Worldwide Gender Gap in Religion

The Pew Research Center released a new study on gender and religion, finding that women are generally more religious than men.

Standard lists of history’s most influential religious leaders – among them Abraham, Moses, Jesus, Muhammad, Siddhartha Gautama (the Buddha) – tend to be predominantly, if not exclusively, male. Many religious groups, including Roman Catholics and Orthodox Jews, allow only men to be clergy, while others, including some denominations in the evangelical Protestant tradition, have lifted that restriction only in recent decades. Yet it often appears that the ranks of the faithful are dominated by women.

See also:

An Aging World: 2015

The U.S. Census Bureau released its newest report on aging, An Aging World: 2015.

The world population continues to grow older rapidly as fertility rates have fallen to very low levels in most world regions and people tend to live longer. When the global population reached 7 billion in 2012, 562 million (or 8.0 percent) were aged 65 and over. In 2015, 3 years later, the older population rose by 55 million and the proportion of the older population reached 8.5 percent of the total population.

H/T Data Detectives, which highlighted the United States relatively slower aging rate as compared to other countries.

Quiz: Smoking During Pregnancy, 2014

Smoking During Pregnancy, 2014

Click here if you would like to try more quizzes.

How We Die in Michigan

Julie Mack of MLive.com put together mortality statistics from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and found some interesting trends.

A century ago, in 1914, 13 percent of people died from heart disease and 6 percent from cancer. That’s an era when contagious disease and infection killed many people at a much younger age.

In 1964, a half-century ago, after the introduction of antibiotics, heart disease and cancer together accounted for 55 percent of Michigan deaths.

In recent years, heart disease has been declining as a cause of death, while cancer has been on the increase.

Remember: Causes of death are a zero-sum situation. Since everybody dies, if one cause goes down, another must increase.

See also: Michigan’s top 10 causes of death.