Author Archive for ljridley

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The Fastest Growing US Cities Are Mostly In the West

via The Washington Post

Seven of the 15 fastest growing cities in America are in the booming state of Texas, according to the annual ranking released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.

And three of those eight are in the vicinity of Austin, the state’s capital city.

One of those three, San Marcos, population 54,076, holds the distinction of being the fastest-growing city for two consecutive years. Its population increased by 8 percent between July 2012 and July 2013 — the period covered by the survey. It grew 44 percent in the past 15 years.

Full text of the article
Census Bureau Population Estimates

Most segregated schools are now in the Northeast not the South

From an article in the Washington Post:

Sixty years ago this Saturday, the Supreme Court found state laws imposing segregation unconstitutional.

Progress has been made, but the nation has been slipping, according to a new report analyzing government data from UCLA’s Civil Rights Project. And the states where segregation is most prevalent today are not the ones where it reached its boiling point in the 1950s and 1960s.

Washington Post article
Civil Rights Project Report: Executive Summary and Full Report (PDF)

A Tape-Measure for Well-Being

by Tom Barlett
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

From the article:

Pretty much everyone seems happy. In Australia, 93 percent of the population is either happy or very happy. In China, it’s 85 percent. Jordan: 86 percent. They’re chipper in Colombia at 92. Belarus is below average, at 64, but it still has a solid majority of happy campers. In the United States, 90 percent of us are happy and presumably steering clear of the sour-faced 10-percenters.

Those figures come from the latest round, released in April, of the World Values Survey, which has been tracking the beliefs and feelings of humanity since 1981. How do surveyors determine whether people are happy? They ask them. This is what social scientists usually do when they want to find out such things.

The theory is that you are the best source of information about your own happiness. But is that the case?

Read the full article and watch the video for Pharrell Williams’ “Happy”.

The Chronicle Review Special Issue on Inequality

Full table of contents are here. Some highlights include:

Capital Man
by Emily Eakin
Thomas Piketty is economics’ biggest sensation. He’s also the field’s fiercest critic.

Campus Reflection
by John Quiggin
Inequalities in higher education mirror those in society at large.

Is Wedlock for the Weathy?
by June Carbone and Naomi Cahn
Marriage is waning among the poor and increasing among the affluent, but the law hasn’t kept up with those trends.

Impoverished Thinking
Interview by Peter Monaghan
Sendhil Mullainathan discusses scarcity and the economic mind.

Working Papers from NBER

An Empirical Model of Wage Dispersion with Sorting
by Jesper Bagger, Rasmus Lentz #20031
Abstract; PDF

Retirement, Early Retirement and Disability: Explaining Labor Force Participation after 55 in France
by Luc Behaghel, Didier Blanchet, Muriel Roger #20030
Abstract; PDF

Health Status, Disability and Retirement Incentives in Belgium
by Alain Jousten, Mathieu Lefebvre, Sergio Perelman #20035
Abstract; PDF

Health Care in a Multipayer System: The Effects of Health Care Service Demand among Adults under 65 on Utilization and Outcomes in Medicare
by Sherry A. Glied #20045
Abstract; PDF

Place-Based Policies
by David Neumark, Helen Simpson #20049
Abstract; PDF

How Do Providers Respond to Public Health Insurance Expansions? Evidence from Adult Medicaid Dental Benefits
by Thomas C. Buchmueller, Sarah Miller, Marko Vujicic #20053
Abstract; PDF

Inflation in the Great Recession and New Keynesian Models
by Marco Del Negro, Marc P. Giannoni, Frank Schorfheide #20055
Abstract; PDF

Promise Scholarship Programs as Place-Making Policy: Evidence from School Enrollment and Housing Prices
by Michael LeGower, Randall Walsh #20056
Abstract; PDF

Co-residence, Life-Cycle Savings and Inter-generational Support in Urban China
by Mark R. Rosenzweig, Junsen Zhang #20057
Abstract; PDF

Bequests and Heterogeneity in Retirement Wealth
by Mariacristina De Nardi, Fang Yang #20058
Abstract; PDF

Economic Well-being and Anti-Semitic, Xenophobic, and Racist Attitudes in Germany
by Naci H. Mocan, Christian Raschke #20059
Abstract; PDF

Declining Migration within the U.S.: The Role of the Labor Market
by Raven Molloy, Christopher L. Smith, Abigail Wozniak #20065
Abstract; PDF

Disease and Development: A Reply to Bloom, Canning, and Fink
by Daron Acemoglu, Simon Johnson #20064
Abstract; PDF

Job Displacement and the Duration of Joblessness: The Role of Spatial Mismatch
by Fredrik Andersson, John C. Haltiwanger, Mark J. Kutzbach, Henry O. Pollakowski, Daniel H. Weinberg #20066
Abstract; PDF

On the Distributive Costs of Drug-Related Homicides
by Nicolas Ajzenman, Sebastian Galiani, Enrique Seira #20067
Abstract; PDF

Discrimination and the Effects of Drug Testing on Black Employment
by Abigail K. Wozniak #20095
Abstract; PDF

Is Smoking Inferior? Evidence from Variation in the Earned Income Tax Credit
by Donald S. Kenkel, Maximilian D. Schmeiser, Carly J. Urban #20097
Abstract; PDF

Communicating Uncertainty in Official Economic Statistics
by Charles F. Manski #20098
Abstract; PDF

Two Reports from the PRB On Malawi’s Population Structure

Malawi’s Pathway to a Demographic Dividend.
“Over the past decade, countries throughout Africa have experienced sustained economic growth. Despite this growth, almost two of every three people—or 600 million—are still living on less than $2 per day. Like many of its neighbours, Malawi experienced consistent economic growth during the mid-2000s, though this growth had little effect on poverty.”
Download full report (PDF).

A Vision for the Health and Well-Being of Malawi’s Young People.
“Malawi’s large population of young people has special significance for national development. Today, Malawi has the largest population of youth in its history, accounting for 40 percent of Malawi’s total population (16.3 million people).”
Download full report (PDF).

See also: 2012 PRB article, Why Population Matters to Malawi’s Development.

Changing Race From One Census to the Next

Via D’Vera Cohn, Pew Research Center, FactTank

Millions of Americans counted in the 2000 census changed their race or Hispanic-origin categories when they filled out their 2010 census forms, according to new research presented at the annual Population Association of America meeting last week. Hispanics, Americans of mixed race, American Indians and Pacific Islanders were among those most likely to check different boxes from one census to the next.

The Growth of Incarcaration in the United States

From the National Academies Press
Authors: Committee on Causes and Consequences of High Rates of Incarceration; Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ); Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE); National Research Council

From the description:

The Growth of Incarceration in the United States examines research and analysis of the dramatic rise of incarceration rates and its affects. This study makes the case that the United States has gone far past the point where the numbers of people in prison can be justified by social benefits and has reached a level where these high rates of incarceration themselves constitute a source of injustice and social harm.

Information from the NAP website and read the book online

Caught in Poverty

The New York Times is beginning a series examining hardship 50 years after the war on poverty. The first in the series is “50 Years Into the War on Poverty, Hardship Hits Back” by Trip Gabriel:

McDowell County, W.Va., has been a public face of hardship for more than a half-century. But today, it is burdened with a different, less tractable kind of poverty.

Interactive Map: Mapping Poverty in America

The Effects of Rurality on College Access and Choice

Via: Chronicle of Higher Education, The Ticker

By: Michael Andrew Koicich, Texas Tech University
Presented at:
AERA 2014 Annual Meeting
April 4, 2014

Abstract:

Students from rural areas have a history of lower educational attainment at both the K-12 and postsecondary levels, yet this population remains understudied. This study seeks to update past studies of rural youth by examining college attendance and choice decisions for students from non-metropolitan counties. Logistic regression is used to study the postsecondary attendance and institutional choice for rural students. Data are taken from two national data sets, the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 and the 2004 County Typologies published by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which are then combined to conduct this analysis. The results of this study reveal clear disadvantages in postsecondary attendance, institutional level, selectivity, and other indicators resulting simply from living in a non-metropolitan county. The effect of most student characteristics did not vary substantially between rural and non-rural areas, but the analysis did reveal one interesting finding: The relationship between college attendance and choice and a student’s socioeconomic status was weaker for rural students than for non-rural students. Some systematic variation across rural communities was revealed, as well.

Full paper (PDF)