Author Archive for ljridley

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New Census Reports on Income, Poverty and Health Insurance

The U.S. Census Bureau released two new reports: Income and Poverty in the United States: 2014 and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2014. The reports find no real change in either income or poverty level, but the percentage of people without health insurance has declined.

From the press release:

The nation’s official poverty rate in 2014 was 14.8 percent, which means there were 46.7 million people in poverty. Neither the poverty rate nor the number of people in poverty were statistically different from 2013 estimates. This marks the fourth consecutive year in which the number of people in poverty was not statistically different from the previous year’s estimate.

Median household income in the United States in 2014 was $53,657, not statistically different in real terms from the 2013 median income. This is the third consecutive year that the annual change was not statistically significant, following two consecutive annual declines.

The percentage of people without health insurance coverage for the entire 2014 calendar year was 10.4 percent, down from 13.3 percent in 2013. The number of people without health insurance declined to 33.0 million from 41.8 million over the period.

Quiz: Seat Belt Use Among Adult Workers

Note: Primary law: You can be pulled over for not wearing a seat belt. Secondary law: You can be ticketed if you are pulled over for another violation.

Seat Belt Use Among Adult Workers – 21 States, 2013

The Geography of Prisons Is Changing

Prison populations from big cities have been dropping since 2006, while those from small rural counties have been rising. The New York Times Upshot examines this trend:

Just a decade ago, people in rural, suburban and urban areas were all about equally likely to go to prison. But now people in small counties are about 50 percent more likely to go to prison than people in populous counties.

The stark disparities in how counties punish crime show the limits of recent state and federal changes to reduce the number of inmates. Far from Washington and state capitals, county prosecutors and judges continue to wield great power over who goes to prison and for how long. And many of them have no interest in reducing the prison population.

Census Bureau Retires Easy Stats

As of 9/30/2016, Easy Stats will no longer be available. To access data from the American Community Survey, use American FactFinder or QuickFacts. You can provide feedback here.

According to Data Detectives, “The retirement of the application is a result of a CEDSCI data tools assessment from earlier this year. The assessment looked at consolidating data tools to eliminate redundancy and also streamline our data dissemination offerings on”

Quiz: Daily Water Intake, U.S. Men & Women, 2009-2012

The Institute of Medicine recommends that men consume 3.7 liters of water per day and women consume 2.7 liters per day from all food and liquid sources.

Daily Water Intake, U.S. Men & Women, 2009-2012 (from all foods & liquids)

Who Still Smokes

Flowing Data has a new data visualization of smokers in 1994 and 2014 by gender, education, income, and race & origin.

Two decades out from the 1995 law in California, along with the known impact of smoking on one’s health, you’d think smoking rates would be way down. And you’d be right for many demographic groups, but for some, smoking is still the same as it ever was.

[The charts] show estimated percentage of adult smokers among different groups, for 1994 and 2014. Estimates are based on survey data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

NIA opportunities for research in health disparities and aging

The most recent post in Inside NIA underscores several ways they are working to enhance research in aging and health disparities. These include funding opportunities — Health Disparities and Alzheimer’s Disease (R01), Emerging Directions for Addressing Health Disparities in Alzheimer’s Disease (R03), and the administrative supplement program, “Aging Research to Address Health Disparities” — and a framework for future research.

Coding for Data Visualization

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data has 5 tips for for learning to code for visualization: “being able to code your own visualization carries its own benefits like flexibility, speed, and complete customization.”

ACA Implementation Reports

Since 2014, The ACA Implementation Network (of the Rockefeller Institute of SUNY, the Brookings Institution and the Fels Institute of Government of the University of Pennsylvania) has been producing state-wide reports to try to answer the following questions:

  • Who governs state health reform initiatives and activities?
  • What new federal-state and inter-agency relationships have developed under the ACA?
  • And how have states put the principal coverage-related policies into operation, and with what effects?

The state reports are available by clicking on the map at the Network’s website. There are also two region-wide reports: the Western Overview Report and the Southern Overview Report.

H/T Data Detectives

NIA 101: Overview of Grant Process

On June 14, Dr. Chyren Hunter, deputy director of the Division of Extramural Activities and NIA training officer, will be featured in an hour-long webinar explaining the process of applying for NIA funding.

Read more details here and register online here.