Author Archive for ljridley

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Database Trial: ProQuest Chinese Newspapers Collection (1832-1953)

ProQuest Summary:

Gain insight into Chinese political and social life during the turbulent 120 year period from 1832 to 1953 with 12 English-language Chinese historical newspapers. Included are critical perspectives on the ending of more than 2,000 years of imperial rule in China, the Taiping Rebellion, the Opium Wars with Great Britain, the Boxer Rebellion and the events leading up to the1911 Xinhai Revolution, and the subsequent founding of the Republic of China. In addition to the article content, the full-image newspapers offer searchable access to advertisements, editorials, cartoons, and classified ads that illuminate history.

The trial runs until November 27, 2013 and the database may be accessed here: http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/30728.
Please send any feedback to Liangyu Fu at liangyuf@umich.edu

Symposium to explore urban planning in a ‘post-racial’ society

symposium graphic

By Keith Brezius
Source: University Record

The Urban and Regional Planning program at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning is hosting a symposium and workshops that will explore the role of the urban planner and planning in a “post-racial” society.

Students and nationally recognized scholars and practitioners from around the country will converge on U-M on Friday for “Planning in a ‘Post-Racial’ Society (?): New Directions and Challenges.” They will discuss the contributions that urban planners of color have made to cities and to the field of planning.

The event, which is free and open to the public, also will examine how planning is engaging critical debates about race, ethnicity, and poverty, and suggest what will be needed to meet the challenges of the 21st century and to serve the needs of the nation’s evolving demographics.

Details, Participants and Schedule

Top Colleges Are More Diverse Than 20 Years Ago

Elite Institutions: Far More Diverse Than They Were 20 Years Ago
By: Seth Zweifler
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

The nation’s most selective colleges have become significantly more diverse over the past 20 years, a Chronicle analysis of U.S. Education Department data shows. Research universities are more diverse than liberal-arts colleges—and, not unexpectedly, public research universities in racially diverse states like California have made greater gains in diversity than have those in Midwestern states.

Full text
Diversity at Research Universities, 1992-2012
Diversity at Liberal-Arts Colleges, 1992-2012
Race, Ethnicity, and Gender of Full-Time Faculty at More Than 4,300 Institutions

New Working Papers from the NBER

Unemployment Benefits and Unemployment in the Great Recession: The Role of Macro Effects
by Marcus Hagedorn, Fatih Karahan, Iourii Manovskii, Kurt Mitman
Abstract; PDF

Incentives, Selection, and Teacher Performance: Evidence from IMPACT
by Thomas Dee, James Wyckoff
Abstract; PDF

Measuring the Accuracy of Survey Responses using Administrative Register Data: Evidence from Denmark
by Claus Thustrup Kreiner, David Dreyer Lassen, Soren Leth-Petersen
Abstract; PDF

Strategic Parenting, Birth Order and School Performance
by V. Joseph Hotz, Juan Pantano
Abstract; PDF

Affirmative Action: One Size Does Not Fit All
by Kala Krishna, Alexander Tarasov
Abstract; PDF

The Impact of Medicaid on Labor Force and Program Participation: Evidence from the Oregon Health Insurance Experiment
by Katherine Baicker, Amy Finkelstein, Jae Song, Sarah Taubman
Abstract; PDF

The Missing Manual: Using National Student Clearinghouse Data to Track Postsecondary Outcomes
by Susan M. Dynarski, Steven W. Hemelt, Joshua M. Hyman
Abstract; PDF

Uncertainty, Redistribution, and the Labor Market
by Casey B. Mulligan
Abstract; PDF

The Origins of Early Childhood Anthropometric Persistence
by Daniel L. Millimet, Rusty Tchernis
Abstract; PDF

The Effect of Safety Net Programs on Food Insecurity
by Lucie Schmidt, Lara Shore-Sheppard, Tara Watson
Abstract; PDF

Income Mobility and Welfare

International Monetary Fund Working Paper
By: Tom Krebs, Pravin Krishna, and William Maloney

Abstract:

This paper develops a framework for the quantitative analysis of individual income dynamics, mobility and welfare. Individual income is assumed to follow a stochastic process with two (unobserved) components, an i.i.d. component representing measurement error or transitory income shocks and an AR(1) component representing persistent changes in income. We use a tractable consumption-saving model with labor income risk and incomplete markets to relate income dynamics to consumption and welfare, and derive analytical expressions for income mobility and welfare as a function of the various parameters of the underlying income process. The empirical application of our framework using data on individual incomes from Mexico provides striking results. Much of measured income mobility is driven by measurement error or transitory income shocks and therefore (almost) welfare-neutral. A smaller part of measured income mobility is due to either welfare-reducing income risk or welfare-enhancing catching-up of low-income individuals with high-income individuals, both of which have economically significant effects on social welfare. Decomposing mobility into its fundamental components is thus seen to be crucial from the standpoint of welfare evaluation.

Free full text (PDF, 700KB)

Call for Papers: Epidemiologic Reviews

Epidemiologic Reviews is a sister publication of American Journal of Epidemiology and publishes critical reviews on specific themes once a year. The theme in 2014 will be Women’s Health and manuscript submissions are being solicited.

More information can be found here.

For Americans Under 50, Stark Findings on Health

By: Sabrina Tavernise
Source: New York Times

From article:

Younger Americans die earlier and live in poorer health than their counterparts in other developed countries, with far higher rates of death from guns, car accidents and drug addiction, according to a new analysis of health and longevity in the United States.

Researchers have known for some time that the United States fares poorly in comparison with other rich countries, a trend established in the 1980s. But most studies have focused on older ages, when the majority of people die.

This article is based on U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health from the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. The pre-publication edition is available to read online for free here.

An interactive graph comparing the United States and 16 “peer” countries is here and the project website is here.

Health at a Glance: Europe 2012

Source: OECD, Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs

From publication website:

This second edition of Health at a Glance: Europe presents a set of key indicators of health status, determinants of health, health care resources and activities, quality of care, health expenditure and financing in 35 European countries, including the 27 European Union member states, 5 candidate countries and 3 EFTA countries.

The selection of indicators is based largely on the European Community Health Indicators (ECHI) shortlist, a set of indicators that has been developed to guide the reporting of health statistics in the European Union. It is complemented by additional indicators on health expenditure and quality of care, building on the OECD expertise in these areas.

Each indicator is presented in a user-friendly format, consisting of charts illustrating variations across countries and over time, a brief descriptive analysis highlighting the major findings conveyed by the data, and a methodological box on the definition of the indicator and any limitations in data comparability.

Full text (PDF)

The Happy Planet Index: 2012 Report

A Global Index of Sustainable Well-Being
Source: The New Economics Foundation

From the Executive Summary:
There is a growing global consensus that we need new measures of progress. It is critical that these measures clearly reflect what we value – something the current approach fails to do.

The Happy Planet Index (HPI) measures what matters. It tells us how well nations are doing in terms of supporting their inhabitants to live good lives now, while ensuring that others can do the same in the future, i.e. sustainable well-being for all.

The third global HPI report reveals that this is largely still an unhappy planet – with both high and low-income countries facing many challenges on their way to meeting this same overall goal. But it also demonstrates that good lives do not have to cost the Earth – that the countries where well-being is highest are not always the ones that have the biggest environmental impact.

The HPI is one of the first global measures of sustainable well-being. It uses global data on experienced well-being, life expectancy, and Ecological Footprint to generate an index revealing which countries are most efficient at producing long, happy lives for their inhabitants, whilst maintaining the conditions for future generations to do the same.

Full text available (PDF)

New POPLINE website

From the announcement:
This revised website gives you new ways to use POPLINE, the world’s largest database of reproductive health literature. Though we add thousands of new records to the database each year, this is the first major update to the website since 2003.

What’s New?

    Modern design
    Multiple export options
    Mobile-friendly interface
    Customizable Advanced Search
    Saved searches and My Documents
    Over 400-pre-coordinated instant searches
    User profiles & updated document request process
    Filter search results by Keyword, Country, Language, and Year