Author Archive for ljridley

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2014 Updated Fertility Tables

The U.S. Census has release Fertility of Women in the United States: 2014. Data Detectives has some highlights and historical tables can be found here.

Racial Attitudes of White Millennials Are Not Much Different than their Parents’

Scott Clement of the Wonkblog examines five measures of racial prejudice from 3 waves of the General Social Survey conducted by NORC and finds that generally White attitudes towards Black people have not changed much since the Baby Boomers.

Backcasting Native Hawaiian Population

The Pew Research Center Fact Tank examines findings by David Swanson which uses 1910 and 1920 Census data to estimate the population of Hawaii in 1778, the year Capt. James Cook arrived.

In this case, Swanson took a detailed look at the 1910 and 1920 U.S. Census’s Native Hawaiian counts, tracking the survival rate of each five-year age group from one census to the next. For example, he looked at how many children who were newborns to age 4 in 1910 were counted as 10- to 14-year-olds in 1920, then did the same for each successive age group. For each group, he created a “reverse cohort change ratio,” which he used to go back in time and estimate the size of each age group for each decade until he got to 1770.

The article also reports on the growth of the Native Hawaiian population since the 1980s.

Income Inequality and Health

The New York Times Upshot looks at the County Health Rankings and Roadmap Project from University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation which studies income inequality and health at the county level.

We know that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life. New evidence suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same.

H/T Data Detectives

App vs. Web for Surveys

The Pew Research Center has been experimenting with mobile apps for “signal-contingent experience sampling” to gather data about how Americans use their smartphones. They have just released a report examining the possibilities of this method:

This report utilizes a form of survey known as “signal-contingent experience sampling” to gather data about how Americans use their smartphones on a day-to-day basis. Respondents were asked to complete two surveys per day for one week (using either a mobile app they had installed on their phone or by completing a web survey) and describe how they had used their phone in the hour prior to taking the survey. This report examines whether this type of intensive data collection is possible with a probability-based panel and to understand the differences in participation and responses when using a smartphone app as opposed to a web browser for this type of study.

Changes in Global Religion

The Pew Research Center used demographic data from 198 countries to examine the ways the global religious landscape will change:

7 Key Changes in the Global Religious Landscape
– Full report: The Future of World Religions: Population Growth Projections, 2010-2050
Interactive Global Religious Futures website

Wal-Mart’s Urban Spread

In 2010, 0% of the residents of Washington, DC lived within 2 miles of a Wal-Mart. 5 years later, 41% of residents do. NPR compiled data on the locations of Wal-Marts in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Atlanta and explores what this expansion means for urban neighborhoods. Today’s story focuses on what it means for the workers

PRB Webinar: Mapping Research Approaches to the Demographic Dividend

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 23, 2015, from 10:00 AM–11:00 AM (EDT) (GMT-4)

From the e-mail:

The demographic dividend offers a powerful argument linking population dynamics and economic development. This topic has attracted a wide variety of researchers and international development organizations and has recently gained traction among global policy audiences. However, research approaches to the demographic dividend are varied and a greater integration of the methodological approaches may be warranted.

More information and register

HIV outbreak in rural Indiana

Danielle Paquette reports on a recent HIV outbreak in Austin, Indiana and what it shows about the mobility of HIV, poverty and the lack of health care in rural areas.

Job Loss for Workers Over 50

Lydia DePillis from Wonkblog examines data from a new AARP survey, as well as data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Department of Labor, and finds a harsh reality for workers over 50 who lose their jobs.