Archive for the 'Conferences, Workshops & Lectures' Category

PRB Webinar: Extreme Poverty and Health in the United State

When: Thursday, June 11, 2015, 1:00-2:30 pm (EDT)

From the e-mail invitation:

Studies show that a growing number of U.S. families have incomes so low that the difficulties of their living situations may be masked by thinking of the poor as a homogeneous group. For instance, since the mid-1990s the number of families living on less than $2.00 in cash per person per day has more than doubled. Over the same interval, a smaller share of government social welfare spending has gone to the deeply poor.

This webinar will address issues such as how these families subsist, what public assistance they receive, and what their health challenges are. It will feature presentations from key Johns Hopkins researchers on this topic: sociologist Kathryn Edin, economist Robert Moffitt, and epidemiologist Jacky Jennings. It will be moderated by sociologist Andrew Cherlin.

Their presentations will be followed by 10-15 minutes of Q&A.

This webinar is co-hosted by the Hopkins Population Center and PRB’s Center for Public Information on Population Research, with funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Joining the online webinar is free. Participants who choose to listen to the audio via telephone are responsible for their own standard long-distance rates.

PRB Webinar: Mapping Research Approaches to the Demographic Dividend

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 23, 2015, from 10:00 AM–11:00 AM (EDT) (GMT-4)

From the e-mail:

The demographic dividend offers a powerful argument linking population dynamics and economic development. This topic has attracted a wide variety of researchers and international development organizations and has recently gained traction among global policy audiences. However, research approaches to the demographic dividend are varied and a greater integration of the methodological approaches may be warranted.

More information and register

The Rise of Life Sentences in the US: a Conversation with Nicole Porter of the Sentencing Project

May 23, 2014
4:00pm – 6:00pm
School of Social Work Building – Educational Conference Center, 1840

U-M Crime Control, Poverty and Justice Workgroup, in partnership with the American Friends Service Committee, is hosting a talk with Nicole Porter, Director of State Advocacy with the Sentencing Project. Nicole will discuss life sentences, the aging prison population, and issues of racial justice in the US Criminal Justice Policy. In addition, there will be a panel of former prisoners who have served time on a life sentence in the Michigan Department of Corrections.

SPONSOR: School of Social Work Office of Alumni Relations

Economists in a Blizzard

Economists are at their annual meeting in the teeth of a big snowstorm. In case you missed the conference, here’s the presidential address by Claudia Golden on the cause of the remaining gender gap:

A Grand Gender Convergence: Its Last Chapter
Claudia Goldin | Harvard University
American Economic Association Presidential Address [draft version]
January 4, 2014

More relevant to PSC is that Martha Bailey and Brad Hershbein were awarded the IZA Young Labor Economist Award for their paper The Opt-In Revolution? Contraception, Fertility Timing and the Gender Gap in Wages.

And via Twitter, Justin Wolfers points to some job openings for economists – internet economist.


[Link to Internet Economist article]

Human Behavior Trove Lures Economists to U.S. Tech Titans
By Aki Ito | Bloomberg
January 03, 2014

PRB Webinar – The Economic and Social Consequences of Job Loss and Unemployment

Wednesday, November 20, 2013, 1-2 pm.

From the announcement:

In this webinar, Jennie E. Brand, Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the California Center for Population Research (CCPR) at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Till von Wachter, Associate Professor of Economics and Faculty Affiliate of CCPR at UCLA, will discuss some of the short- and long-term consequences of job loss and unemployment for families in the United States. Their discussion will be followed by 10-15 minutes of Q&A.

This webinar is provided by PRB’s Center for Public Information on Population Research, with funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Joining the online webinar is free. Participants who choose to listen to the audio via telephone are responsible for their own standard long-distance rates.

Space is limited. Click here to register or go to (

System requirements for attending the webinar:
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer
Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

Conference: Aging in America

The 2014 Annual Conference of the American Society on Aging will be March 11-15 in San Diego, CA. Visit the website for more information.

View the announcement online. Or download a PDF.

Symposium to explore urban planning in a ‘post-racial’ society

symposium graphic

By Keith Brezius
Source: University Record

The Urban and Regional Planning program at the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning is hosting a symposium and workshops that will explore the role of the urban planner and planning in a “post-racial” society.

Students and nationally recognized scholars and practitioners from around the country will converge on U-M on Friday for “Planning in a ‘Post-Racial’ Society (?): New Directions and Challenges.” They will discuss the contributions that urban planners of color have made to cities and to the field of planning.

The event, which is free and open to the public, also will examine how planning is engaging critical debates about race, ethnicity, and poverty, and suggest what will be needed to meet the challenges of the 21st century and to serve the needs of the nation’s evolving demographics.

Details, Participants and Schedule

Quantitative Text Analysis: Michael vs Jacob

Most of the data demographers use are numeric and are easily handled via statistical packages. Text data via Google NGrams or names from the Social Security Names Database are more commonly analyzed using Python.

CSCAR and ARC are sponsoring free Python training Friday, November 8th. Space is limited.

In case you miss the workshop, here’s a link to some Big Data Tutorials by Neal Caren at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

And, to get back to the title of this blog entry, below are three data visualizations on names. The first two are the most common name by state & gender from 1960 to 2010.

Click on the images to activate the gifs.

us_map_gnames us_map_bnames

Notice that for the girls, Lisa dominated the US in 1965, which means I was born 10+ years too early to have that name. And for the boys, watch the epic battle for Michael vs Jacob. Also note that Jose is the dominant male name in Texas in 1996. Arizona also has two Hispanic names (Jose and Angel) in the recent past.

The third data visualization explores unisex names:
unisex names

Finally, think of these as data. We have a link to research on black first names as well as a post on the declining popularity of Mary.

Big Data Tutorials, Neal Caren (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill).

Google NGrams Viewer

Google NGrams Data
Note, we have downloaded quite a bit of this. See Data Service before you download another copy.

Social Security Names Database

A Wondrous GIF Shows the Most Popular Baby Names for Girls Since 1960
Rebecca Rosen | The Atlantic
October 18, 2013

America’s Most Popular Boys’ Names Since 1960, in 1 Spectacular GIF
Megan Garber |The Atlantic
October 24, 2013

The most unisex names in US history
Data Underload | FlowingData Blog
September 25, 2013

International Year of Statistics [2013]

The International Year of Statistics
The International Year of Statistics is scheduled for calendar year 2013. But, there are lots of upcoming conferences and other activities associated with this celebration. You’ll need to send in abstracts in advance of 2013.

One last feature of the celebration website is the resource section. This may prove useful for teaching purposes.

Upcoming Conferences

International Federation on Ageing (IFA) 11th Global Conference on Ageing
28 May – 1 June 2012
Prague, Czech Republic

The IFA 11th Global Conference on Ageing, entitled ‘Ageing Connects’ is taking place during the greatest demographic upheaval in the world’s history – the juncture between globalisation, urbanisation and population ageing. In the twenty years since the first IFA conference in India in 1992, the average life expectancy in the Czech Republic has increased by nearly 7% with a corresponding improvement in health status of older people in this region. Notwithstanding these improvements, today there are now more people globally living in poverty; family caregivers are an essential and expected partner in the health care system; and workforce trends across generations are volatile, as are the debates around social pensions and financial protection.

National Center for Health Statistics announces its National Conference on Health Statistics, 2012
August 6-8, 2012
Washington, DC

August 6: One-day Learning Institute
Get hands-on training in accessing and analyzing NCHS survey data.

August 7-8: Main Conference
Learn about the latest developments at NCHS and hear from national leaders in the fields of health, health data, and statistics.