Archive for the 'Funding News' Category

The 2015 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research sponsors the annual Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for scholars in the field of retirement research and policy. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities for junior scholars from all academic disciplines to pursue cutting-edge projects on retirement income issues. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Grant Awards

Up to three grants of $45,000 are awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants are required to complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. Grant recipients may be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, DC or Baltimore.

Submission

The 2015 Sandell Grant Program deadline will be January 31, 2015. View the proposal guidelines and budget matrix.

Previous Awardees include Lauren Hersch Nicholas.

See the website for more information or to submit an application.

Big Data Initiative at NIH-OBSSR

From the Connector blog post:

The NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative is designed to address these issues and facilitate broad use of biomedical big data through new data sharing policies, catalogs of datasets, and training. Behavioral and social scientists should be aware of several recently-issued RFAs. In these RFAs NIH is requesting applications for Centers of Excellence, Data Coordination Centers, training enhancement, and data facilitation. If you are involved in mHealth, this might be a great opportunity for you, or if you are pooling data for the purposes of GxE interaction studies in the behavioral and social sciences this initiative might also fit you well. Critically consider your current research and ways that Big Data may already be part of your portfolio.

Read the full post
NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) website

Obama Budget Proposes Only Modest Increases for Research Spending

By: Paul Basken
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

The budget proposes an increase of $30.4 billion, which when inflation is accounted for, is a cut of 1%. NSF, NASA and the Department of Defense fare little better.

Read the full Chronicle article here

SciENcv, New NIH tool for Biosketches

“NIH has worked closely with six other federal agencies (DOD, DOE, EPA, NSF, USDA, and the Smithsonian), the Federal Demonstration Partnership, and the extramural research community to create a system that will provide comprehensive curriculum vita information, and at the same time reduce the burden associated with applying for research support. This system — the Science Experts Network or SciENcv — enables researchers to easily maintain and generate biosketches for federal grant applications and progress reports, and, as of September, is available to the public in a beta version.” More information is at http://nexus.od.nih.gov/all/2013/11/20/test-drive-sciencv/

Try it by going to My NCBI and sign in at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/

NIH May Limit Grant Applications

via Chronicle of Higher Education.
By: Paul Basken

The NIH, the nation’s largest provider of basic research money to universities, has seen its budget cut so much over the last decade that scientists now have only about a 15-percent chance of a successful grant application.

In response to such budget-related stresses, NIH officials are mulling their options. Certainly the agency has been pressing Congress to provide more money. But it is also evaluating ways of being more efficient with the money it has, and that includes changing its own celebrated peer-review system for awarding grants.

Read the full story | NIH Analysis of Applications and Success Rates

Dissertation Fellowship Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College announces the 2014 Dissertation Fellowship Program for research on retirement income and policy issues, funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration.

The Dissertation Fellowships support doctoral candidates writing dissertations on retirement income and policy issues. The program is open to scholars in all academic disciplines. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Up to two fellowships of $28,000 will be awarded.

The submission deadline for proposals is Friday, February 14, 2014. Award recipients will be announced by April 2014.

Visit the Dissertation Fellowship website to view the proposal guidelines.

Previous awardees include Desmond Toohey.

The 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College announces the 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for research on retirement income and policy, funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Grant Awards

Up to two grants of $45,000 will be awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants are required to complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. A select group of grant winners will be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, DC or Baltimore.

Submission

The submission deadline for the 2014 Sandell Grant Program is February 14, 2013. Download this year’s proposal guidelines and budget matrix.

Previous Awardees include Lauren Hersch Nicholas.

See the website for more information or to submit an application.

Dear Congress: Why are you doing this?

It is likely that the government shutdown and debt ceiling crisis will be resolved this week, but there has still been harm to the data and research infrastructure. Bookmark this post and use it as notes for your next letter to your representatives.

The Government Shutdown was Temporary, Its Damage to Science Permanent
Andrew Rosenberg | Scientific American
October 18, 2013

Federally funded science allows us to do things as a country that we could never do alone. But the threat of shutdown, combined with inconsistent funding from Congress, leaves America’s scientific enterprise in the lurch.

Shutdown: It ain’t over when it’s over
Jeff Neal | Federal News Radio
October 15, 2013
Author notes that the shutdown is not a toggle switch, where we can easily switch the government back to “on.” There rare many repercussions of the shutdown, detailed in the post.

Sunday Shutdown Reader: Harold Varmus on Self-Destruction in the Sciences
James Fallows | The Atlantic
October 13, 2013

Closed Question
Editorial | Nature
October 9, 2013
The US shutdown is damaging science, and Congress must be called to account.
There are more specific stories, linked to the end of this editorial. In case, they don’t remain linked, here they are:
NASA missions struggle to cope with shutdown
08 October 2013
US Antarctic research season is in jeopardy
04 October 2013
NIH shutdown effects multiply
02 October 2013
US government shuts down
01 October 2013

Cancelled NIH study sections: a subtle, yet disastrous, effect of the government shutdown
Rafael Irizarry | StatsBlogs
October 10, 2013
(This article was originally published at Simply Statistics, and syndicated at StatsBlogs.)

The New York Times has a series of editorials, all tagged with “Government Shutdown.” I’ll link to one of them on funding the Census Bureau.

To Stop the Craziness in Washington, Fund the Census
Teresa Tritch | New York Times
October 4, 2013

And, finally, most readers of this blog probably received an Action Alert from Population Association of America (PAA). When it shows up on the PAA website, I’ll link to it here.

Scientific version of insider trading

This is not within demography, but here’s a snippet that every researcher shudders to think about:

[From the Retraction Watch website]

Case Western dermatology department hit with second ORI sanction within 6 months

The charge:

“engaged in research misconduct by plagiarizing significant portions from research grant application R21 AR061881 that she had reviewed for NIAMS, NIH, and inserting that text into her submitted grant application R01 AR062378-01. Respondent also plagiarized significant portions of text from the following scientific articles and one U.S. patent application available on the Internet.”

Friday News: Bad

Here is some bad news for scientific research funding, which pretty much missed the news cycle. This will be updated with the reactions and responses which will hit the media cycle next week.

NSF cancels political-science grant cycle
US funding agency said to be dodging restrictions set by Congress.
Beth Mole | Nature
August 2, 2013

The NSF’s decision removes one of the main financial lifelines for political-science research. “This is somewhere between devastating and crippling,” says Henry Farrell, a political scientist at George Washington University in Washington DC and an author of the Monkey Cage, a widely read political-science blog. But Farrell blames the political climate rather than the funding agency for the cut. “The NSF is in an extremely awkward situation,” he says.

. . . . . Avoiding the August funding round may be a strategic move by Hume to see whether the constraints disappear when the next spending bill is passed, says Aldrich. “If he can save the money and spend it later when there’s more clarity, that would be helpful,” Aldrich says.

Other researchers agree. “I think they’re probably worried about upsetting Congress,” says Rick Wilson, a political scientist at Rice University in Houston, Texas, and editor of the American Journal of Political Science. “So why not pull the plug rather than risk it?”