Archive for the 'Funding News' Category

Budget Carnage

This is just a proposed budget, but the cuts to NIH and Commerce are not promising. And, NSF isn’t even mentioned:

US science agencies face deep cuts in Trump budget
S. Reardon, J. Tollefson, A. Witze & E. Ross | Nature
March 16, 2017

Rumours of the White House proposal have swirled for weeks, alarming many researchers who depend on government funding — and science advocates who worry that the Trump administration’s stance will jeopardize US leadership in fields ranging from climate science to cancer biology. It is not clear how much of the plan will survive negotiations in Congress over the next several months, however.

And the Trump proposal is notable for what it leaves out. The barebones document omits detail about many programmes and even entire agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF).

NIH, DOE Office of Science face deep cuts in Trump’s first budget
Science News Staff | Science
March 16, 2017

Here’s an articulation of the heavy lifting Trump has ahead to enact his budget re-allocation:

To reach that defense spending goal, however, Congress will need to agree to change to change a 2011 law, known as the Budget Control Act (BCA), that places binding caps on defense and non-defense discretionary spending, which accounts for roughly one-third of the $3.5 trillion that the federal government spends annually. (The other two-thirds goes to entitlement programs such as Medicare and Social Security, other kinds spending required by law, and paying interest on the national debt). Changing the BCA could be a heavy political lift, however, requiring 60 votes in the Senate. And, in general, White House budget requests are just one of many factors that Congress considers as it exercises its Constitutional authority to set spending levels. Lawmakers from both parties have already expressed skepticism about some of the cuts Trump has proposed, and the NIH cuts will likely face stiff opposition. Congress won’t decide final numbers until late this year.

Muzzling Federal Scientists

Breaking news: scientists in selected federal agencies have been told to no longer update their websites with reports, factsheets, etc. Here’s a summary of the memo that the Environmental Protection Agency got:

The memo said there would be no press releases, social media posts or blog messages until further notice. It also asked for a list of external speaking engagements for staff and any planned webinars. It warned that listservs would be reviewed and that staff should “only send out critical messages, as messages can be shared broadly and end up in the press.”

Federal Workers Told To Halt External Communication In First Week Under Trump
Sam Stein | Huffington Post
January 24, 2017

Trump bans EPA employees from giving social media updates
Mallory Shellbourne | The Hill
January 24, 2017

Trump Administration Moves to Muzzle Scientists, Block Research
Union of Concerned Scientists | http://www.ucsusa.org/
January 24, 2017

USDA science researchers ordered to stop publishing news releases, other documents
Jose DelReal | Washington Post
January 24, 2017

Information lockdown hits Trump’s federal agencies
Andrew Restuccia, Alex Guillen and Nancy Cook | Politico
January 24, 2017

[Additional News]

Note, that this happened under the Harper government in Canada [summary]. And Canadian scientists warned US scientists of this possibility a month ago:

Canadian Scientists Warn U.S. Colleagues: Act Now to Protect Science under Trump
Dina Fine Maron | Scientific American
December 20, 2016

Advancing research into Alzheimer’s disease

A new post by Richard Hodes on the Inside NIA blog discusses the increase in public interest and funding in recent years, which allowed the NIA to approve 26 concept proposals for funding opportunities.

We expect to have a record number of new FOAs coming out over the next few months. The FOAs that will result from these concept proposals involve every NIA division; in a number of cases, two or more divisions will be co-sponsoring an FOA. The list of concepts is available online. Please take a look and start to think about the kinds of projects or studies you might propose.

We anticipate releasing the first group of these FOAs in the next four to six weeks. Others will follow over the next two to three months. We’ll be writing about each group in this blog, as well as announcing them in other venues.

Read Preparing for a possible future: Advancing research into Alzheimer’s disease

NIA opportunities for research in health disparities and aging

The most recent post in Inside NIA underscores several ways they are working to enhance research in aging and health disparities. These include funding opportunities — Health Disparities and Alzheimer’s Disease (R01), Emerging Directions for Addressing Health Disparities in Alzheimer’s Disease (R03), and the administrative supplement program, “Aging Research to Address Health Disparities” — and a framework for future research.

NIA 101: Overview of Grant Process

On June 14, Dr. Chyren Hunter, deputy director of the Division of Extramural Activities and NIA training officer, will be featured in an hour-long webinar explaining the process of applying for NIA funding.

Read more details here and register online here.

The 2015 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research sponsors the annual Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for scholars in the field of retirement research and policy. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities for junior scholars from all academic disciplines to pursue cutting-edge projects on retirement income issues. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Grant Awards

Up to three grants of $45,000 are awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants are required to complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. Grant recipients may be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, DC or Baltimore.

Submission

The 2015 Sandell Grant Program deadline will be January 31, 2015. View the proposal guidelines and budget matrix.

Previous Awardees include Lauren Hersch Nicholas.

See the website for more information or to submit an application.

Changes to NIH Biosketch

NIH is rolling out a new biosketch format. See details.

Big Data Initiative at NIH-OBSSR

From the Connector blog post:

The NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative is designed to address these issues and facilitate broad use of biomedical big data through new data sharing policies, catalogs of datasets, and training. Behavioral and social scientists should be aware of several recently-issued RFAs. In these RFAs NIH is requesting applications for Centers of Excellence, Data Coordination Centers, training enhancement, and data facilitation. If you are involved in mHealth, this might be a great opportunity for you, or if you are pooling data for the purposes of GxE interaction studies in the behavioral and social sciences this initiative might also fit you well. Critically consider your current research and ways that Big Data may already be part of your portfolio.

Read the full post
NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) website

Obama Budget Proposes Only Modest Increases for Research Spending

By: Paul Basken
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

The budget proposes an increase of $30.4 billion, which when inflation is accounted for, is a cut of 1%. NSF, NASA and the Department of Defense fare little better.

Read the full Chronicle article here

SciENcv, New NIH tool for Biosketches

“NIH has worked closely with six other federal agencies (DOD, DOE, EPA, NSF, USDA, and the Smithsonian), the Federal Demonstration Partnership, and the extramural research community to create a system that will provide comprehensive curriculum vita information, and at the same time reduce the burden associated with applying for research support. This system — the Science Experts Network or SciENcv — enables researchers to easily maintain and generate biosketches for federal grant applications and progress reports, and, as of September, is available to the public in a beta version.” More information is at http://nexus.od.nih.gov/all/2013/11/20/test-drive-sciencv/

Try it by going to My NCBI and sign in at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/myncbi/