Archive for the 'In the News' Category

2020 Census Program Management Review Broadcast

Press release:

The U.S. Census Bureau will hold its quarterly 2020 Census Program Management Review on Oct. 28 from 1 to 4 p.m. Agenda topics include high-level program updates, the address canvassing operation and test, 2020 Census content, upcoming tests and 2020 Census systems readiness.

In order to provide wider access to this event and share information about 2020 Census planning with the public, the Census Bureau will broadcast the review live at  <www.census.gov/newsroom/census-live.html>. If members of the media would like to attend in person, please contact pio@census.gov.

For materials from previous program management reviews, click here.

Follow and participate in the conversation on Twitter and Instagram using #2020Census or by following @uscensusbureau on both platforms.

PSC Researchers In the News

Daniel Eisenberg discusses U-M program offering mental health services to student athletes. Huffington Post, 1/28/2015. Related journal article. See also Athletes Connected.

William H. Frey says current minority college completion rates predict decline in college-educated Americans. National Journal, 1/14/2015.

Miles Kimball and an anonymous co-author discuss male bias in economics in an article for Quartz.

Lloyd Johnston discusses the decline in teens’ smoking cigarettes and their increasing use of e-cigarettes in several media outlets. Steve Forbes has a different perspective, calling out Johnston specifically in a Forbes commentary.

Martha Bailey and Susan Dynarski’s work cited in story on sending teams of poor kids to college. The Atlantic, 12/11/2014. Related journal article.

Yu Xie’s work on Asian-American children’s school performance cited in story on parenting styles. Deseret News National. 12/08/2014. Related journal article

David Lam says improving U.S. economy may spur higher fertility, but if not, we shouldn’t worry. NPR – Marketplace. 12/04/2014.

Bill Frey says politics are being reshaped by four demographic trends in the U.S. Washington Post. 11/29/2014.

Apoorva Jadhav comments on recent government-sponsored sterilizations in India. “India sterilization deaths spark outcry for change” – CBC Radio. 11/25/2014. Listen to interview: Apoorva at 18:03.

New Rules for Human-Subject Research Remain a “Priority” But Continue to Be Delayed

By: Christopher Shea
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

In 2011, the Department of Health and Human Services had floated some ideas for changes in the rules governing such research. The aim was both to better protect the subjects and to reduce the much-resented bureaucratic burden on professors and university staff members.

… Today, more than two years after the conference, the regulations remain just where they were in 2011: still under development.

Full article

Russell Sage announcing new journal: RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences

The Russell Sage Foundation announced the launch of a new social science journal, RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences. “RSF is intended to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations on timely topics of interest to social scientists and other academic researchers, policymakers, and the public at large. Each issue will be thematic in nature and will focus on a specific research question or area of interest. The introduction to each issue will provide an accessible, broad, and synthetic overview of the research question under consideration and the current thinking from various fields. RSF will be a peer-reviewed, open-access journal of original empirical research by both established and emerging scholars. The first issue is scheduled to be published in fall 2015.”

Demolition as an Urban Strategy

Via The New York Times
by: Timothy Williams

Large-scale destruction is well known in Detroit, but it is also underway in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Buffalo and others at a total cost of more than $250 million. Officials are tearing down tens of thousands of vacant buildings, many habitable, as they seek to stimulate economic growth, reduce crime and blight, and increase environmental sustainability.

Full NYT story
Brookings Report (2012)
Berkeley Report (published in 2012 in the Yale Law Journal)

PubMed Commons: Comments Welcome

pmc logo

PubMed Commons has been implemented on a trial basis. This feature will allow researchers to comment on any article indexed at PubMed and read the comments of others. Eligibility is limited to those with an NIH or Wellcome Trust grant or to those who are listed as an author on any publication listed in PubMed. The latter group has to get an invitation from the former.

Read more here:

Join Pub Med’s Revolution in Post Publication Peer Review
James Coyne | PlosOne blog
October 22, 2013

And, for further background on the impetus for this feature:

Stanford professor’s pivotal role in bringing commenting capability to PubMed
Rosanne Spector | School of Medicine News [Stanford]
October 29, 2013

Janet Yellen, Economic Demographer

Janet Yellen was nominated as the first female head of the Federal Reserve yesterday [note, that Rand Paul has put a hold on the nomination] . Here is a paper she and her husband George Ackerloff wrote almost 20-years ago on the increase in unmarried childbearing:

An Analysis of Out-Of-Wedlock Births in the United States
George Ackerloff and Janet Yellen | Brookings Review
Fall 1996
This Policy Brief was prepared for the Fall 1996 issue of the Brookings Review and adapted from “An Analysis of Out-of-Wedlock Childbearing in the United States,” which appeared in the May 1996 issue of the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Also of interest is a news story about Ackerloff in the mid-1980s on “efficiency wages” based on their experience hiring babysitters:

Why Unemployment Sometimes Lingers On Stirs Renewed Interest
Alan Murray | Wall Street Journal
December 26, 1985
Note that a young Larry Summers (age 30) is mentioned in this piece. Sticky wages are also mentioned in this summary of her appointment in the New York Times:

Yellen’s Path From Liberal Theorist to Fed Voice for Jobs
Binyamin Appelbaum | New York Times
October 9, 2013
As thorough as this piece is, it fails to mention that Charlie Brown was a teaching assistant for her at Harvard.

Scientific version of insider trading

This is not within demography, but here’s a snippet that every researcher shudders to think about:

[From the Retraction Watch website]

Case Western dermatology department hit with second ORI sanction within 6 months

The charge:

“engaged in research misconduct by plagiarizing significant portions from research grant application R21 AR061881 that she had reviewed for NIAMS, NIH, and inserting that text into her submitted grant application R01 AR062378-01. Respondent also plagiarized significant portions of text from the following scientific articles and one U.S. patent application available on the Internet.”

Family Demography in the News

Below is a compilation of posts about family formation and childbearing. The last piece is less on marriage and childbearing and instead focuses on the “mom penalty” in academia.

How to Live in a World Where Marriage Is in Decline
Philip Cohen | The Atlantic
June 4, 2013
This piece examines trends in marriage over time in the US and discusses the policy implications of this to the “marriage movement” promoters.

Rising Trend of Births Outside Marriage
Carl Haub | Population Reference Bureau
April 2013
This short piece examines international trends and concludes “What we can say for certain is that this new household structure is quite unlikely to revert to times past.”

Autumn of the Patriarchs: Traditional demographic patterns are changing astonishingly fast
The Economist
June 1, 2013
This is another international piece, based on statistics from Latin America. It shows trends in fertility rates and childlessness. And it is based on research by our old friend Ron Lesthaeghe and colleagues.

Marriage: More than a Century of Change
Julissa Cruz | National Center for Marriage and Family Research
June 2013
This is a very nice resource based on data from the US Census, American Community Survey, and the Vital Statistics system. It shows trends in marriage rates for women from 1890 to 2010.

Recent Trends in Births and Fertility Rates Through December 2012
Brady Hamilton and Paul Sutton | CDC
June 2013
The recent decline in fertility rates may have reached bottom.

Births Rise as Parents-to-Be Renew Confidence in Economy
Stephanie Armour | Bloomberg News
June 6, 2013
Based on the CDC report, U.S. birth-rate increase a sign of growing confidence in the economy

The Mom Penalty
Colleen Flaherty | Inside Higher Education
June 6, 2013
Do babies matter to academic careers? (Spoiler alert: for moms, “yes.”) based on Do Babies Matter? Gender and Family in the Ivory Tower

Why is Science Behind a Paywall?

This is one of the more thorough pieces on the open data/open access issue. And, it is a timely piece as Pamela Smock takes over the editorship of Demography, which is a Springer product. Springer is mentioned in the piece.

Why is Science Behind a Paywall?
Alex Mayyasi | The priceonomics blog
May 10, 2013