Archive for the 'New Resources' Category

Altmetrics: What are they and/or should I care?

Altmetrics are metrics and qualitative data that are complementary to citation-based metrics. Some argue that these metrics should be considered in tenure decisions, along with the more traditional metrics of publishing in a high impact journal with many citations. Almetrics cover a wider range of materials than just those in professional journals – websites, blogs, materials in repositories like figshare or GitHub. It also covers more than citations, such as views and downloads.

How to Use Altmetrics to Showcase Engagement Efforts for Promotion and Tenure
Stacy Konkiel | Altmetric Blog
October 18, 2016

This blogpost from the Altmetric site, shows how Altmetrics can be incorporated into a traditional tenure document.

And an even more informative article on Altmetrics is a summary written by Yan Fu in a PSC news report:
Altmetrics: New Ways to Measure the Impact of Research Products
Yan Fu | PSC Center News
April 2014

Promoting Your Research

Philip Cohen of Family Inequality has some suggestions for promoting your research:

These are some basic thoughts for academics promoting their research. You don’t have to be a full-time self-promoter to improve your reach and impact, but the options are daunting and I often hear people say they don’t have time to do things like run a Twitter account or write blogs. Even a relatively small effort, if well directed, can help a lot. Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good. It’s fine to do some things pretty well even if you can’t do everything to your ideal standard.

It’s all about making your research better — better quality, better impact. You want more people to read and appreciate your work, not just because you want fame and fortune, but because that’s what the work is for.

World Bank Gender Data Portal

The World Bank has launched a gender data portal:

Gender data are one of the most visited parts of our data site, and these new resources make it easier than ever to see our data’s gender dimensions. The country and topic dashboards give an overview of the distribution and trends in data across important themes, and the online tables and book are a useful reference for the most commonly accessed data.

Open Data, the World Bank blog, pulled four charts from the portal to illustrate gaps which still need to be closed.

A New FiveThirtyEight Podcast

In addition to their weekly podcast on data, What’s the Point?, as well as their sports podcast, Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight has launched an election podcast called, appropriately enough, FiveThirtyEight Elections.

Podcast by FiveThirtyEight

The FiveThirtyEight blog has a podcast called What’s the Point: “A show about our data age. Each week, Jody Avirgan brings you stories and interviews on how data is changing our lives.”

The most recent episode is about polling and religion in America.

U.S. and World Population Clock Has Been Updated with New Features

The Census Bureau has updated their U.S. and World Population Clock with new visualizations and data:

From the Director’s Blog:

Today, I’m excited to showcase the addition of several new features to the World Population Clock. For the first time, basic population facts and visualizations are available for 228 countries and areas around the world, just as they are for U.S. states.

In addition, World Population Clock users can now get Census Bureau data on international trade in goods by country. It’s amazing to see the range and value of goods that states export to countries around the world – and it’s easy to download, share and embed the data in social media.

Statistical Atlas of the United States

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data set out to recreate the original 56 page Statistical Atlas of the United States, first published in 1874 using 1870 Census data. Yau’s version uses current, publicly available government data.

Now that the first 56 maps are complete, Yau has decided to continue the project and produce a more compete Statistical Atlas with more maps and chart. He plans to update these weekly.

2015 Kids Count Data Book

The Annie E. Casey Foundation released it’s annual Kids Count Data Book: State Trends in Child Well-Being.

From the website:

The 2015 KIDS COUNT Data Book focuses on America’s children in the midst of the country’s economic recovery. While data show improvements in child health and education, more families are struggling to make ends meet, and a growing number of kids live in high-poverty neighborhoods. In addition to ranking states in several areas of child well-being, the report also examines the influence of parents’ education, health and other life circumstances on their children.

Go to the Kids Count Data Center to look at state data, as well as county, city and congressional district level data.

censusAmericans

Jia Zhang of FiveThirtyEight built a Twitter bot which pulls data from the U.S. Census and creates mini-narrative. For example, “I haven’t moved recently. I work for a private company. I was widowed.”

Census data is often seen at a large scale — atlases, research studies and interactive visualizations all offer the view from 10,000 feet. But there are people inside those top-line numbers. And when you start to look at the people in the data sets, you get a glimpse of their lives. Just a few descriptors — how much they work, whom they take care of, where they were born — can give us a sense of the people around us.

Follow censusAmericans here.

Repository for ‘Dark Data’

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are working on a project called DataBridge to create an archive for data sets and metadata that would otherwise be lost once the papers they were produced for are published.

Read The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Wired Campus article here.