Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

White Segregation Decreases As Black Segregation Remains Common

By Dan Keating
Source: Wonkblog

Over the past 20 years, whites and blacks have experienced opposite trends in segregation. Asians, Hispanics and blacks are moving into historically white neighborhoods. Vastly fewer whites live surrounded by just other white people. Whites look around and see multi-ethnic neighbors. They perceive expanded opportunity and integration because that is what they see. And they think everyone else is experiencing the same things.

But a Washington Post analysis of Census data shows that the experience in historically African American neighborhoods of major cities has been far different, as they have remained heavily isolated. Whites, Asians and Hispanics are not moving into those neighborhoods, and blacks who remain there experience persistent segregation.

Read the full story

The Antidote for “Anecdata”: A Little Science Can Separate Data Privacy Facts from Folklore

The Antidote for “Anecdata”: A Little Science Can Separate Data Privacy Facts from Folklore
Daniel Barth-Jones | Info/Law Blog [Harvard]
November 21, 2014
This is a great piece that shows again that most of the publicity about re-identification in data are overblown:

The 11 in 173 million risk demonstrated for this celebrity ride re-identification (or 1 in 15,743,614) is truly infinitesimal. To put this in perspective, this risk is over 1,000 times smaller than one’s lifetime risk of being hit by lighting. With proper de-identification applied and the cryptographic hash problem fixed in any future data releases, this spooky specter of celebrity cyber-stalking using TLC taxi data is likely to vanish as soon as one turns on the lights.

This blog post is in reaction to the release of NYC taxi medallion data, which were improperly anonymized. A previous blog post described the data.

Here is the piece that sensationalizes the possibility of re-identification, based on famous people who ride cabs.
Riding with the Stars: Passenger Privacy in the NYC Taxicab Dataset
Anthony Tockar | Neustar Blog
September 15, 2014

Big Data: NYC Taxi Cab Trips

This is a big data resource, and more. Check out the reaction to the bad anonymization here.

20GB of uncompressed data comprising more than 173 million individual trips. Each trip record includes the pickup and dropoff location and time, anonymized hack licence number and medallion number (i.e. the taxi’s unique id number, 3F38, in my photo above), and other metadata.

Before the link to the data, here’s an analysis based on similar data:
Why New Yorkers Can’t Find a Taxi When It Rains
Eric Jaffe | City Lab Blog
October 20, 2014
Provides a nice synopsis of some research using taxi cab rides. Read it for the links to the formal research papers.

New York City Taxi Cab Trips [in small chunks]

FOILing NYC’s Taxi Trip Data
Chris Whong | personal website of an Urbanist, Mapmaker, Data Junkie
March 18, 2014
a synopsis of how he got the data via a FOIA request & a link to the data on rides/fares as single files, instead of the chunked version above.

and the story about how the taxicab medallion IDs were improperly anonymized:

Poorly anonymized logs reveal NYC cab drivers’ detailed whereabouts
Dan Goodin | ars technica
June 23, 2014

On Taxis and Rainbows: Lessons from NYC’s improperly anonymized taxi logs
Vijay Pandurangan | Medium blog

Getting A More Accurate Count Of Arab Americans

The PSC Infoblog has reported on this earlier here, but this is still of interest.

The U.S. Census Is Trying To Get A More Accurate Count Of Arab Americans
Ben Casselman | fivethirtyeight.com Blog
November 24, 2014

Note that this article mentions that the Census Bureau did a special tabulation for Homeland Security to provide counts of Arab populations by geography (place and zip code).

Some Arabs have expressed reluctance to identify themselves on a government form, especially after the Census Bureau shared detailed data on the Arab-American population with the Department of Homeland Security in the early 2000s

These “detailed tabulations” referenced above, were public use tables from American FactFinder. Here’s the original FOIA request from the Electronic Privacy Information Center:

FOIA request: Department of Homeland Security Obtained Data on Arab Americans From Census Bureau [Source: EPIC]

Here is the example for Places drawn from DP-2. Here’s the example for Zip Codes drawn from (Tables PCT16 and PCT17).

Measuring Race in the Census: Its Fluid

Researchers at the Census Bureau and the Minnesota Population Center matched census responses across the 2000 and 2010 Census and examined changes in the Race/Hispanic origin responses. They found that the biggest change was Hispanics changing their “Other Race” choice in 2000 to “White” in 2010. The groups least likely to change responses were those who identified themselves as non-Hispanic white, black or Asian in 2000.

America’s Churning Races: Race and Ethnic Response Changes between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census
Center for Administrative Records Research and Applications & Minnesota Population Center
CARRA Working Paper #2014-09
August 8, 2014

This paper is nicely summarized here – based on the PAA version:

Millions of Americans changed their racial or ethnic identity from one census to the next
D’Vera Cohn | Pew Research Center
May 5, 2014

As a reminder, the Census Bureau has spent the better part of the past year, looking to change how it collects data on race and ethnicity.

U.S. Census looking at big changes in how it asks about race and ethnicity
D’Vera Cohn | Pew
March 14, 2014

2010 Census Race and Hispanic Origin Alternative Questionnaire Experiment[website]
2010 Census Race and Hispanic Origin Alternative Questionnaire Experiment[report]

Growing Numbers of Americans Are Remarrying

Four-in-Ten Couples are Saying “I Do,” Again
By Gretchen Livingston
Source: Pew Research Social & Demographic Trends

In 2013, fully four-in-ten new marriages included at least one partner who had been married before, and two-in-ten new marriages were between people who had both previously stepped down the aisle, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of newly released data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Complete Report (PDF)

See also:
“The New American Family” in the ISR Sampler and Pam Smock’s interview on Stateside about the changing American Family

The Changing Geography of Immigration

Unauthorized Immigrant Totals Rise in 7 States, Fall in 14
By Jefferey S. Passel and D’Vera Cohn
Source: Pew Research Hispanic Trends Project

The U.S. unauthorized immigrant population has leveled off nationally after the Great Recession, but state trends have been more volatile. From 2009 to 2012, according to new Pew Research Center estimates, the population of unauthorized immigrants rose in seven states and fell in 14.

Complete Report (PDF)

See also:

Expansion of Free Lunch Could Have a Negative Effect on Research Data

By: Ben Wieder
Source: FiveThirtyEight

A new federal initiative that could provide millions of students with a free lunch might have an unexpected cost for researchers and state educational agencies.

“It’s obviously good for kids, but from a pure data perspective it provides some weaknesses,” said Brandon LeBeau, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa’s College of Education who has studied the use of free lunch eligibility in education research.

Read the full story

The Uninsured Under the ACA

By: Jason Millman
Source: WonkBlog (Washington Post)

An additional 10.3 million people gained health insurance in the first year of expanded coverage under the Affordable Care Act, according to an analysis published in the New England Journal of Medicine this summer. We still won’t have the most official count from the U.S. Census Bureau until next fall, but that’s the number the Obama administration is using. And that, according to the Department of Health and Human Services, leaves about 32 million people still lacking coverage heading into this ACA open enrollment period.

Here’s what we know about who’s still uninsured and what’s kept them from getting covered.

Keep reading
NEJM Analysis

Rethinking Parole

By: Jessica Glazer
Source: FiveThirtyEight

Parole conditions vary widely from state to state and case to case. As states attempt to reduce their prison populations, and as the number of parolees grows — now up to more than 851,000 people nationally — advocates are increasingly concerned that parole rules can be too restrictive for the average parolee, making it too easy to end up behind bars again for technical violations. As states contend with the high cost of incarceration and use parole to cut costs, advocates are calling for consistency in how it’s deployed.

Read the full story