Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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Data Demise: ACS 3-year product

The Census Bureau has released its last 3-year ACS product with the 2011-2013 release. This is a cost-cutting move, although the Census Bureau might argue that it never meant for there to be a 3-year product in the first place.

The Census Bureau is not cutting back on data collection – it is eliminating the tabular release of the 3-year data (geographic areas of 20,000+). The 1-year data are for geographies of 65,000+ and the 5-year data have no population limits. These will continue to be released.

The microdata products have share the same release types: 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year. These all share the same geographic limit (PUMAs), but the 3-year and 5-year products are not just concatenations of the 1-year files. They have been re-weighted and income-denominated items are inflated to the last year (e.g., 2013). [See explanatory note from IPUMS].

The ACS 3-year Demographic Estimates are History
Brendan Buff | APDU Blog post
Feb 3, 2015

Census Bureau Statement on American Community Survey 3-Year Statistical Product
Stanford University Libraries | Ron Nakao’s Blog

America’s Middle Class

Both the New York Times Upshot and the Pew Research Center recently examined trends in middle-income households.

The Pew Research report is here.
The Upshot report is here. The related New York Times article is here.

Hispanic Segregation

Ana Swanson at WonkBlog discusses a map by William H. Frey showing the areas of the countries where Hispanics are segregated.

Unemployment and Unemployment Benefits

Ben Casselman of the FiveThirtyEight blog discusses the changing nature of unemployment and the failure of the benefit structure to keep up with those changes.

Read the full article.

The Gap in Public and Scientist’s Views on Science and Society

The Pew Research Center explores the differences between the ways scientists and the public view science and society.

Read the full article
Complete report (PDF)
Topline Questionnaire (PDF)
Interactive graphs

Millennials are projected to outnumber Baby Boomers

Richard Fry of Pew Research Center examines new released Census Bureau population projections. The generation born between 1981 and 1997 continues to grow while the Baby Boom generation (born between 1946 and 1964) is shrinking and they are expected to outnumber the Boomers this year. The comments on the article provide an interesting discussion of the boundaries of generations.

Read the full analysis.

Effects of Economically Mixed Neighborhoods

Emily Badger of Wonkblog writes about the surprisingly negative effects on boys growing up with wealthy neighbors. The research draws on a longitudinal study of low-income boy in the UK.

Read the article at Wonkblog here. And the abstract and full article from The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry is here.

City Limits and City Growth

Kirk Goldsberry from the FiveThirtyEight blog responses to an op-ed in the Washington Post about the changing demographics of U.S. cities.

The Washington Post argues that the growth of cities results in a loss of African-Americans. FiveThirtyEight argues that spatial growth and demographic growth are different and the way city limits are defined complicates the definition of a city’s population.

Read the Washington Post op-ed here. And the FiveThirtyEight piece here.

Mapping Social Security Benefits

Wonkblog highlights four maps created by Seth Kadish of Vizual Statistix.

The maps show … the percentage of a county’s population that receives OASDI benefits; the percentage of OASDI beneficiaries who are retired, rather than disabled; the areas where payments to men most greatly outweigh those given to women; and the average monthly OASDI payment, in hundreds of dollars.

Japan’s Fertility Is Worse than Predicted

Via Wonkblog

Japan population shrank by 268,000 in 2014, the largest reduction on record, and the government has done a terrible job at predicting it’s fertility rate.

Wonkblog post
The article is based on a WINPEC Working Paper, “Aging and Deation from a Fiscal Perspective” (PDF).