Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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Diversity and Segregation

Nate Silver of FiveThirtyEight examines urban diversity and segregation:

Chicago deserves its reputation as a segregated city. But it is also an extremely diverse city. And the difference between those terms — which are often misused and misunderstood — says a lot about how millions of American city dwellers live. It is all too common to live in a city with a wide variety of ethnic and racial groups — including Chicago, New York, and Baltimore — and yet remain isolated from those groups in a racially homogenous neighborhood.

Generations and Partisanship

The Pew Research Center released a report examining the political leanings of different generations: A Different Look at Generations and Partisanship (PDF is here).

See also: A Deep Dive Into Party Affiliation (PDF here).

Gender Gap in the U.S. Black Population

According to Justin Wolfers, David Leonhardt and Kevin Quealy of The Upshot, there are roughly 1.5 million black men missing from the 25 to 54 age group due to incarceration and early death. “For every 100 black women in this age group living outside of jail, there are only 83 black men. Among whites, the equivalent number is 99, nearly parity.”

Read the full story and here is the methodology.

The Increase of Singles Changes City Housing

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines the rising trend of single people living alone and what that will mean for city housing.

See also: Compact Units: Demand and Challenges from NYU Furman Center.

Food Stamp Experiments

Max Ehrenfreund of Wonkblog uses Gwyneth Paltrow’s food stamp experiment to examine the barriers that people in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program actually face when trying to feed themselves and their families.

Americans in general have unhealthy diets, and they don’t buy much produce, no matter how much they earn. And shoppers on food stamps who do want to feed their families more greens don’t just have to worry about the cost, but also about finicky children, spoilage, and any number of other hassles that are just minor inconveniences for more affluent families.

Geographical Variations in Equality of Opportunity

Raj Chetty of Harvard has been leading a team of researchers (including former Population Studies Center trainee Patrick Kline) on a project examining the geography of income mobility. From the project website:

Is America the “Land of Opportunity”? In two recent studies, we find that: (1) Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. [summary][paper] Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families. (2) Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries. [summary][paper]

See The Equality of Opportunity Project website for executive summaries, papers, city rankings, data and more.

See the New York Times’ In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters for interactive maps based on this work.

Black Immigration to the U.S.

According to a new report from the Pew Research Center, 8.7% of the U.S. black population is foreign born, nearly triple what it was in 1980.

Rapid growth in the black immigrant population is expected to continue. The Census Bureau projects that by 2060, 16.5% of U.S. blacks will be immigrants. In certain metropolitan areas, foreign-born blacks make up a significant share of the overall black population. For example, among the metropolitan areas with the largest black populations, roughly a third of blacks (34%) living in the Miami metro area are immigrants. In the New York metro area, that share is 28%. And in the Washington, D.C., area, it is 15%.

Download the complete report (PDF)

See also: 6 key findings about black immigration to the U.S.

Majority Minority Counties

The Pew Research Center analyzed Census data and found that between 2000 to 2013, 78 counties in 19 states changed from majority white population to populations where no racial or ethnic group is in the majority (their analysis only includes counties with populations of 10,000 or more in 2013).

Millennials and Urban Living

Jed Kolko follows up Ben Casselman’s article Think Millennials Prefer the City? Think Again in FiveThirtyEight with some explanations of why this generation is less urban.

Most urban neighborhoods are not Brooklyn, and most 25- to 34-year-olds don’t have bachelor’s degrees.

2014 Updated Fertility Tables

The U.S. Census has release Fertility of Women in the United States: 2014. Data Detectives has some highlights and historical tables can be found here.