Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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How Has the Class of 2008 Fared?

From the Chronicle of Higher Education:

The Class of 2008 graduated from college in the early months of the Great Recession. New government data show that, four years later, 69 percent of its members were working and not enrolled in a postsecondary program, while 10.7 percent were both employed and enrolled. Nearly 6 percent were enrolled but not working, while 6.7 percent were unemployed and 7.9 percent were out of the work force.

Read the full story.
National Center for Education Statistics report, “Baccalaureate and Beyond: A First Look at the Employment Experiences and Lives of College Graduates, 4 Years On”

Fundamentalisms and Women’s Rights

Eldis has put together some resources on Christian and Islamic fundamentalism and women’s rights.

From the website:

This guide features a handful of excellent resources on this difficult and broad issue including: practical guidance on fundamentalisms for human rights activists; regional studies into Christian and Islamic fundamentalist discourses around sexual and reproductive health and rights; recommendations on broadening understanding and developing more nuanced approaches to tackling fundamentalisms; an overview of women’s rights in the Middle East and North Africa region.

Find links to these resources here.

Declining Teen Births in U.S.

Via Population Reference Bureau
By Heidi Worley

From the article:

(June 2014) Births to U.S. teenage girls ages 15 to 17 have decreased by 63 percent over the past 20 years (from 39 per 1,000 teens in 1991 to 14 per 1,000 teens in 2012), according to the latest statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). With an 8 percent decline between 2011 and 2012, the birth rate for teens ages 15 to 17 is at its lowest level ever recorded in the United States.

Full text of article

Vital Signs: Births to Teens Aged 15-17 Years — United States, 1991-2012, from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Births: Final Data for 2012, National Vital Statistics Report 62(9) (PDF)

PRB Interview with Doug Wolf on Late-Life Disability and Long-Term Care

From the website:

(June 2014) Douglas Wolf discussed disability and long-term care policy in the U.S. with Marlene Lee, PRB program director for Academic Research and Relations. Wolf is the Gerald B. Cramer Professor of Aging Studies in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and director of the Center for Aging & Policy Research at Syracuse University.

View the video

UNHCR Global Trends 2013

Via The UN Refugee Agency Statistics and Operational Data

From the e-mail announcement:

The report provides an overview of the statistical trends and changes in the global populations of concern to UNHCR, i.e. refugees, returnees, stateless persons and certain groups of internally displaced persons (IDPs), placed in the context of major humanitarian developments and displacement during the year.

By end-2013, 51.2 million individuals were forcibly displaced worldwide as a result of persecution, conflict, generalized violence, or human rights violations. It is the first time in the post-World War II era that numbers have exceeded 50 million people. Some 16.7 million persons were refugees: 11.7 million under UNHCR’s mandate and 5.0 million Palestinian refugees registered by UNRWA. The global figure included 33.3 million IDPs and close to 1.2 million asylum-seekers. If these 51.2 million persons were a nation, they would make up the 26th largest in the world.

Download the report (PDF)

Breaking News: Protect the 2020 Census

Senator David Vitter (R-LA) has filed an amendment to the FY2015 Commerce, Justice, and Science Appropriations bill (H.R. 4660), being considered now in the U.S. Senate, that would prohibit the Census Bureau from spending funds on the 2020 Census unless it includes questions regarding U.S. citizenship and immigration status. [Source: APDU]

Below are links to talking points related to this amendment:
Vitter Amendment Talking Points [from the Census Project]

Vitter Census Amendment to Require Questions about Illegal Aliens [Press Release, David Vitter]

Supreme Court rebuffs Louisiana’s 2010 Census Suit [PSC Info Blog]

Apportionment Resources: Legal [PSC Info Blog]

Trends in Migration to the U.S.

From the Population Reference Bureau:

The number of international migrants more than doubled between 1980 and 2010, from 103 million to 220 million. In 2013, the number of international migrants was 232 million and is projected to double to over 400 million by 2050.

Publication’s webpage
Full Report (PDF)

The Fastest Growing US Cities Are Mostly In the West

via The Washington Post

Seven of the 15 fastest growing cities in America are in the booming state of Texas, according to the annual ranking released today by the U.S. Census Bureau.

And three of those eight are in the vicinity of Austin, the state’s capital city.

One of those three, San Marcos, population 54,076, holds the distinction of being the fastest-growing city for two consecutive years. Its population increased by 8 percent between July 2012 and July 2013 — the period covered by the survey. It grew 44 percent in the past 15 years.

Full text of the article
Census Bureau Population Estimates

Most segregated schools are now in the Northeast not the South

From an article in the Washington Post:

Sixty years ago this Saturday, the Supreme Court found state laws imposing segregation unconstitutional.

Progress has been made, but the nation has been slipping, according to a new report analyzing government data from UCLA’s Civil Rights Project. And the states where segregation is most prevalent today are not the ones where it reached its boiling point in the 1950s and 1960s.

Washington Post article
Civil Rights Project Report: Executive Summary and Full Report (PDF)

A Tape-Measure for Well-Being

by Tom Barlett
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

From the article:

Pretty much everyone seems happy. In Australia, 93 percent of the population is either happy or very happy. In China, it’s 85 percent. Jordan: 86 percent. They’re chipper in Colombia at 92. Belarus is below average, at 64, but it still has a solid majority of happy campers. In the United States, 90 percent of us are happy and presumably steering clear of the sour-faced 10-percenters.

Those figures come from the latest round, released in April, of the World Values Survey, which has been tracking the beliefs and feelings of humanity since 1981. How do surveyors determine whether people are happy? They ask them. This is what social scientists usually do when they want to find out such things.

The theory is that you are the best source of information about your own happiness. But is that the case?

Read the full article and watch the video for Pharrell Williams’ “Happy”.