Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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Railroads, Highways and Racial Segregation

Emily Badger and Darla Cameron of Wonkblog examine the ways railroads, highways and other man-made lines divided American cities by race.

Like many metaphors, “the other side of the tracks” was originally a literal epithet. Blacks were often historically restricted to neighborhoods separated from whites by railroads, turning the tracks into iron barriers of race and class.

In many cities, these dividing lines persist to this day — a reflection of decades of discriminatory policies and racism, but also of the power of infrastructure itself to segregate.

Children and Poverty

The Pew Research Center examined data from the U.S. Census Bureau report “Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013” and found that the poverty rate for black children has stayed steady even as the rate for other groups declines.

Illegal Immigration From Mexico

The Pew Research Center listed several facts based on their analysis about illegal immigration from Mexico, such as the number of Mexican immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, who is apprehended at the border, deportations, and where unauthorized immigrants live and work.

Newest New Yorkers

The New York City Planning Department released the latest in its Newest New Yorker series. The 2013 edition, The Newest New Yorkers: Characteristics of the City’s Foreign-born Population, builds on the earlier edition, and provides detailed analyses of the newest data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey. There is also an interactive map showing the immigrant make-up of each of New York’s neighborhoods.

H/T Data Detectives

Teen Smoking and Cigarette Price

Andrew Flowers of FiveThirtyEight examines recent studies on teen smoking and reports that the link between the cost of cigarettes and the teen smoking rate has weakened in recent years. Flowers discusses theories about why this happened and what it could mean for policy.

U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base

The U.S. Census Bureau released revised estimates and projections for 24 countries, including China, Iraq, Malawi, South Africa and United States. See the release note tab for a full list of revised countries.

Big data and smart cities

Urban Demographics posted a presentation by Rob Kitchin based on his paper “The real-time city? Big data and smart urbanism” (gated version; working paper version).

Abstract:

‘Smart cities’ is a term that has gained traction in academia, business and government to describe cities that, on the one hand, are increasingly composed of and monitored by pervasive and ubiquitous computing and, on the other, whose economy and governance is being driven by innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship, enacted by smart people. This paper focuses on the former and, drawing on a number of examples, details how cities are being instrumented with digital devices and infrastructure that produce ‘big data’. Such data, smart city advocates argue enables real-time analysis of city life, new modes of urban governance, and provides the raw material for envisioning and enacting more efficient, sustainable, competitive, productive, open and transparent cities. The final section of the paper provides a critical reflection on the implications of big data and smart urbanism, examining five emerging concerns: the politics of big urban data, technocratic governance and city development, corporatisation of city governance and technological lock-ins, buggy, brittle and hackable cities, and the panoptic city.

Global Middle Class

The Pew Research Center released a report on the promise and reality of a global middle class.

In 2011, a majority of the world’s population (56%) continued to live a low-income existence, compared with just 13% that could be considered middle income by a global standard, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of the most recently available data.

And though there was growth in the middle-income population from 2001 to 2011, the rise in prosperity was concentrated in certain regions of the globe, namely China, South America and Eastern Europe. The middle class barely expanded in India and Southeast Asia, Africa, and Central America.

See also:

Marriage Chances by County

The NY Times’ Upshot analyzed data from the Equality of Opportunity group and found that where you grow up affects your chances marrying by age 26.

The most striking geographical pattern on marriage, as with so many other issues today, is the partisan divide. Spending childhood nearly anywhere in blue America — especially liberal bastions like New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston and Washington — makes people about 10 percentage points less likely to marry relative to the rest of the country. And no place encourages marriage quite like the conservative Mountain West, especially the heavily Mormon areas of Utah, southern Idaho and parts of Colorado.

Measuring Abortion

Amelia Thomson-Deveaux and Hayley Munguia of FiveThirtyEight examine the different ways abortion is measured in the United States and how difficult it is to gain a deep understanding of abortion trends based on these measures.

See also: The Abortion Rate Is Falling Because Fewer Women Are Getting Pregnant.