Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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App vs. Web for Surveys

The Pew Research Center has been experimenting with mobile apps for “signal-contingent experience sampling” to gather data about how Americans use their smartphones. They have just released a report examining the possibilities of this method:

This report utilizes a form of survey known as “signal-contingent experience sampling” to gather data about how Americans use their smartphones on a day-to-day basis. Respondents were asked to complete two surveys per day for one week (using either a mobile app they had installed on their phone or by completing a web survey) and describe how they had used their phone in the hour prior to taking the survey. This report examines whether this type of intensive data collection is possible with a probability-based panel and to understand the differences in participation and responses when using a smartphone app as opposed to a web browser for this type of study.

Changes in Global Religion

The Pew Research Center used demographic data from 198 countries to examine the ways the global religious landscape will change:

7 Key Changes in the Global Religious Landscape
– Full report: The Future of World Religions: Population Growth Projections, 2010-2050
Interactive Global Religious Futures website

Wal-Mart’s Urban Spread

In 2010, 0% of the residents of Washington, DC lived within 2 miles of a Wal-Mart. 5 years later, 41% of residents do. NPR compiled data on the locations of Wal-Marts in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Atlanta and explores what this expansion means for urban neighborhoods. Today’s story focuses on what it means for the workers

PRB Webinar: Mapping Research Approaches to the Demographic Dividend

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 23, 2015, from 10:00 AM–11:00 AM (EDT) (GMT-4)

From the e-mail:

The demographic dividend offers a powerful argument linking population dynamics and economic development. This topic has attracted a wide variety of researchers and international development organizations and has recently gained traction among global policy audiences. However, research approaches to the demographic dividend are varied and a greater integration of the methodological approaches may be warranted.

More information and register

HIV outbreak in rural Indiana

Danielle Paquette reports on a recent HIV outbreak in Austin, Indiana and what it shows about the mobility of HIV, poverty and the lack of health care in rural areas.

Job Loss for Workers Over 50

Lydia DePillis from Wonkblog examines data from a new AARP survey, as well as data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Department of Labor, and finds a harsh reality for workers over 50 who lose their jobs.

A Child’s Day: At a Glance

Data from the 2011 Survey of Income and Program Participation were used to create this infographic. Click on it to see the full size image.


A Child's Day: At a Glance

[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]

Urban Living

This week, Wonkblog had several articles about different aspects of city living:

The cities where salaries are keeping up with housing prices – and where they are not

Median wages grew 1.3 percent between the second quarter of 2012 and the second quarter of 2014. However, home prices grew by a stunning 17 percent, according to RealtyTrac, which used data on average weekly wages from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and median home prices from sales deeds in 184 metropolitan areas.

When cheap housing isn’t really a good deal

The golden rule of housing affordability — embraced by government agencies, mortgage lenders, private landlords and the financially savvy — says you that should not spend more than around 30 percent of your income on your housing costs.

This number, though, is a little deceptive — or, at least, it’s incomplete. That’s because decisions that you make about where to live influence what you pay for life’s second-biggest expense: transportation.

New Census data: Americans are returning to the far-flung suburbs

During the housing bubble, Americans moved in droves to the exurbs, to newly paved subdivisions on what was once rural land. Far-out suburbs had some of the fastest population growth in the country in the early 2000s, fueled by cheap housing and easy mortgages. And these places helped redefine how we think about metropolitan areas like Washington, pushing their edges farther and farther from the traditional downtown.

In the wake of the housing crash, these same places took the biggest hit. Population growth in the exurbs stalled. They produced a new American phenomenon: the ghost subdivision of developments abandoned during the housing collapse before anyone got around to finishing the roads or sidewalks.

How the whitest city in America appears through the eyes of its black residents

(Portland, OR) is about 76 percent white, making it the whitest big city in the U.S. And diversity has been dwindling in the neighborhoods close to the center of town, as minorities have increasingly moved out to the city’s edges.

Welcome to the world of the $6 bus ride to work, $7 juice not included

The new venture-backed private transportation service Leap began offering rides in San Francisco last week in a swanky shuttle meant to feel “more like a living room than a bus.” A ride with the service, which costs $6 one-way or $5 in bulk, comes with WiFi, USB ports, a laptop bar and locally made pressed juices (for sale on board, that is).

Gender Gaps

Ri Liu used data from the World Bank and the UNDP 2014 Human Development Report to create a series of graphs illustrating the gender gaps in labor force participation, secondary education, parliamentary participation, and income levels in countries around the world.

H/T Flowing Data

Desire to Move and Residential Mobility

The U.S. Census Bureau released a report examining householders’ desire to move in 2010 and their subsequent mobility patterns in 2010-2011.

The residences we live in are associated with economic opportunities, health status, social relationships, and exposure to crime and disorder. This report focuses on people who desire to move to a new residence because of dissatisfaction with where they live, and it examines how frequently people who desire to move to a new residence do so. “Residences” here include housing units, neighborhoods, and local communities.

H/T Data Detectives