Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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ACS Median Earnings by Detailed Occupation

The U.S. Census Bureau released 2013 Earnings by Sex and Detailed Occupation tables from the American Community Survey. Other tables include Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin by Occupation: 2012 and Median Earnings of College Graduates by Field of Bachelor’s Degree and Occupation: 2012.

All table packages are here.

H/T Data Detectives

Foreign-Born Share of U.S. Population Expected to Reach Historic High by 2060

The Pew Research Center FactTank examines the new Census Bureau population projections and finds “the nation’s foreign-born population is projected to reach 78 million by 2060, making up 18.8% of the total U.S. population…with the bureau projecting that the previous record high of 14.8% in 1890 will be passed as soon as 2025.”

Pew Research Center article
2014 National Population Projections: Summary Tables

SNAP Receipt for Households, 2000-2013

The U.S. Census Bureau released a new American Community Survey Brief, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households: 2000-2013.

Introduction:

This report presents data on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) receipt at the national and state levels based on the annual American Community Survey (ACS) from 2000 to 2013.1 In addition, this report discusses the current SNAP receipt rates for metropolitan statistical areas with large populations. The ACS question about SNAP identifies households in which one or more current members received SNAP during the past 12 months. Data reflect households, not individuals. If any person living at the sample address at the time of the interview received SNAP in the past 12 months, then the household is included in the estimate of SNAP participation.

H/T: Data Detectives

Race Disparity in Milwaukee

An article in NPR’s Code Switch examines racial disparities in Milwaukee, Wisconsin:

While many Rust Belt cities — Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, etc. — have similar histories of African-American struggles, Milwaukee has some of the same problems but not the same profile, mainly because it isn’t well known for its large black population at all. But blacks make up 40 percent of the city and, for many who grew up there (like me), none of this data is surprising. Milwaukee is a vibrant city known for its breweries and ethnic festivals and can be a great place to live — unless you’re black. Statistically, it is one of the worst places in the country for African-Americans to reside. Here’s a breakdown of how — and why — being black in Brew City carries a heavy burden.

Read the full article.

Urban Models and Urban Center

Peter Gordon examines the way central business districts and sub-centers are defined by economists:

Following Milton Friedman’s suggestion that economic models be judged not by the plausibility of their assumptions, but by their ability to predict, Queen Elizabeth asked some of LSE’s finest why they did not see the Great Recession coming. Ouch!

U.S. Population Projections

A new U.S. Census Bureau Report analyzing U.S. population projections: Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014-2060.

From the introduction:

Between 2014 and 2060, the U.S. population is projected to increase from 319 million to 417 million, reaching 400 million in 2051. The U.S. population is projected to grow more slowly in future decades than in the recent past, as these projections assume that fertility rates will continue to decline and that there will be a modest decline in the overall rate of net international migration. By 2030, one in five Americans is projected to be 65 and over; by 2044, more than half of all Americans are projected to belong to a minority group (any group other than non-Hispanic White alone); and by 2060, nearly one in five of the nation’s total population is projected to be foreign born.

H/T: Data Detectives

Robert Putnam On Growing Up Poor

An article in Wonkblog explores Robert Putnam’s new book Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis and the influence he has had on politicians as diverse as President Obama and congressman Paul Ryan.

From the article:

For the past three years, Putnam has been nursing an outlandish ambition. He wants inequality of opportunity for kids to be the central issue in the 2016 presidential election. Not how big government should be or what the “fair share” is for the wealthy, but what’s happening to children boxed out of the American dream.

His manifesto, “ Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis” will be published Tuesday. It places brain science, sociology and census data alongside stories of children growing up on both sides of the divide. Many of the findings draw on the work of other researchers who have long studied families, education or neuroscience. But Putnam has gathered up these strands under a single thesis: that instead of talking about inequality of wealth or income among adults, we ought to focus on inequalities in all of the ways children accumulate — or never touch — opportunity.

Population Trends in U.S. Cities

A new U.S. Census Current Population Report (PDF) examines the ways populations in U.S. cities changed between 2010 and 2013.

From the introduction:

Nearly two-thirds of Americans live in incorporated places, commonly referred to as cities. As the majority of the nation’s population lives in cities, patterns of population change among cities and the social and economic conditions affecting them often represent national trends. Using data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses and 2013 population estimates, this report examines the population in cities and highlights how city populations changed between 2000 and 2010, and between 2010 and 2013. The report discusses the distribution of the population in cities by region, state, and city population size. It also highlights the fastest growing cities, city population densities, annexation, and new incorporations between 2010 and 2013.

The New York State Data Center Affiliates wrote this report up in a March 4 post for their Data Detectives blog.

Time Use of the Nonemployed

Josh Katz of the NYTimes blog The Upshot pulled data from the American Time Use Survey to examine how nonemployed men and women spend their weekdays:

Nonworkers spend much more time doing housework. Men without jobs, in particular, spend more time watching television, while women without jobs spend more time taking care of others. And the nonemployed of both sexes spend more time sleeping than their employed counterparts.

Read the whole article, including interactive charts and graphs.

Trends in Religious Restrictions and Hostilities

The Pew Research Center has released a new report (PDF) analyzing governmental and societal impingement on religious beliefs and practices.

This article looks at the overall trends. And this article examines the restrictions and hostilities in the most populous countries.