Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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The Working Poor in 2013

The Bureau of Labor Economics released a report on the number of “working poor” in the United States from 1986-2013.

The number of “working poor” in the United States was 10.5 million in 2013. The working poor are people who spent at least 27 weeks in the labor force during the year—either working or looking for work—but whose incomes were below the official poverty level. The working-poor rate, or the ratio of the working poor to all those in the labor force for at least 27 weeks, was 7.0 percent in 2013.

See the full report (PDF).

The Most and Least Racially Diverse U.S. Religious Groups

The Pew Research Center examined the racial/ethnic make up of 29 groups, including Protestant denominations, other religious groups and three religiously unaffiliated groups. The analysis included 5 racial and ethnic groups: Hispanics, non-Hispanic whites, blacks, Asians, and other/mixed-race.

See also: Major U.S. metropolitan areas differ in their religious profiles

White Gains/Losses in Cities and Suburbs

William H. Frey notes in a piece for Brookings that:

More than one-quarter of the 100 largest metropolitan areas experienced white losses in both cities and suburbs. Less than half (45) of the these areas followed the traditional patterns of white city loss and suburban gain—including Midwest areas such as Columbus, Kansas City, and Minneapolis-St. Paul.

The Geography of Childhood

Emily Badger and Christopher Ingraham of Wonkblog use data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Kids Count to map the best and worst states for children on a variety of indicators, including poverty, food security, housing, family structure, education, exercise, and incarceration rates.

See also, The growing wealth gap that nobody is talking about.

The Influence of Economic Segregation

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines the policy effects of economic segregation, particularly the skewed view the wealthy have of poverty:

The wealthy, surrounded by other wealthy people, generally believed the U.S. population was wealthier than it actually is. It’s easy to imagine why they might make this mistake: If you look around you and see few poor people — on the street, in your child’s classroom, at the grocery store — you may think poverty is pretty rare.

See also: Dawtry, Sutton & Sibley, Why Wealthier People Think People Are Wealthier, and Why It Matters

New Book From the Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative

The Oxford Poverty & Human Development Initiative published a book on Multidimensional Poverty Measurement & Analysis:

Multidimensional poverty measurement and analysis is evolving rapidly. Quite recently, a particular counting approach to multidimensional poverty measurement, developed by Sabina Alkire and James Foster, has created considerable interest. Notably, it has informed the publication of the Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) estimates in the Human Development Reports of the United Nations Development Programme since 2010, and the release of national poverty measures in Chile, Mexico, Colombia, Bhutan and the Philippines. The academic response has been similarly swift, with related articles published in both theoretical and applied journals.

The high and insistent demand for in-depth and precise accounts of multidimensional poverty measurement motivates this book, which is aimed at graduate students in quantitative social sciences, researchers of poverty measurement, and technical staff in governments and international agencies who create multidimensional poverty measures.

Draft chapters are available online.

Mapping the Oldest and Youngest States in the U.S.

Ana Swanson of Wonkblog examines a series of animated maps created by Jishai Evers of Dadaviz showing the states and counties where different generations (“Greatest Generation” to “Generation Z”).

A few generations ago, most people lived out their lives in the places where they were born. Today, Americans are used to moving, often due to the pull of economic opportunity. Teenagers move across the country to go to college, 20- and 30-somethings flock to cities for jobs, and white-haired “snow birds” head to Florida or Arizona to escape the winter.

Changes in Hourly Earnings by State

The Economics Daily (from the Bureau of Labor Statistics) reports on the percent changes in average hourly earning by state, May 2014 to May 2015 using data from the Current Employment Statistics (State and Metro Areas).

Age at Marriage and Risk of Divorce

Christopher Ingraham of Wonkblog writes about a new analysis of family data data by Nicholas Wolfinger:

Conventional wisdom has it that the older you are when you get married, the lower your chances for divorce. But a fascinating new analysis of family data by Nicholas H. Wolfinger, a sociologist at the University of Utah, suggests that after a certain point, the risk of divorce starts to rise again as you get older.

See Wolfinger’s report at Family Studies: Want to Avoid Divorce? Wait to Get Married, But Not Too Long.

See also his follow up, Replicating the Goldilocks Theory of Marriage and Divorce.

Poll Results and Response Rates

Scott Keeter, Pew Research Center’s director of survey research, discusses declining response rates and what it means for survey reliability.