Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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Lynchings in America

lynchings_map

[click here for link to NYT graphic]

The Equal Justice Initiative has documented 4,000 lynchings in the South between 1870 and 1950. This resource is potentially useful for examining out-migration of blacks, particularly men, from the South during this era. It could also be useful for explaining current race-based inequalities, including incarceration.

Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror
Summary Report | Equal Justice Initiative
February 2015

Supplement: Lynchings by County [pdf only]

Note that the graphic by the New York Times has a time-dimension in it. I am awaiting the full report from the Equal Justice Initiative to see what additional detail is available in it.

Press Coverage [scroll down]

Diminishing Returns of Incarceration

In an article for the FiveThirtyEight website, Oliver Roeder discusses a report he co-authored with Lauren-Brooke Eisen and Julia Bowling for the Brennan Center for Justice which examines the limited effect of incarceration on crime rates.

Report abstract:

What Caused the Crime Decline? examines one of the nation’s least understood recent phenomena – the dramatic decline in crime nationwide over the past two decades – and analyzes various theories for why it occurred, by reviewing more than 40 years of data from all 50 states and the 50 largest cities. It concludes that over-harsh criminal justice policies, particularly increased incarceration, which rose even more dramatically over the same period, were not the main drivers of the crime decline. In fact, the report finds that increased incarceration has been declining in its effectiveness as a crime control tactic for more than 30 years. Its effect on crime rates since 1990 has been limited, and has been non-existent since 2000.

More important were various social, economic, and environmental factors, such as growth in income and an aging population. The introduction of CompStat, a data-driven policing technique, also played a significant role in reducing crime in cities that introduced it.

The report concludes that considering the immense social, fiscal, and economic costs of mass incarceration, programs that improve economic opportunities, modernize policing practices, and expand treatment and rehabilitation programs, all could be a better public safety investment.

FiveThirtyEight article, The Imprisoner’s Dilemma
Brennan Center for Justice Report, What Caused the Crime Decline?

Segregation in 20th Century America

Emily Badger of Wonkblog discusses a new study by Trevon Logan and John Parman which examines the rise of segregation in the United States from 1880 to 1940 using the Census records gathered by counters walking door-to-door, “They show patterns of fine-grained racial segregation that are impossible to see in public Census data today where privacy concerns override precision.”

Read the full Wonkblog article.
Logan and Parman’s paper, “The National Rise in Residential Segregation”.

Comparing 4 World Cities

Ricky Burdett of LSE Cities compares the economic, political and environmental shifts in London, Delhi, Tokyo, and Bogota in an article for the Guardian.

Data Demise: ACS 3-year product

The Census Bureau has released its last 3-year ACS product with the 2011-2013 release. This is a cost-cutting move, although the Census Bureau might argue that it never meant for there to be a 3-year product in the first place.

The Census Bureau is not cutting back on data collection – it is eliminating the tabular release of the 3-year data (geographic areas of 20,000+). The 1-year data are for geographies of 65,000+ and the 5-year data have no population limits. These will continue to be released.

The microdata products have share the same release types: 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year. These all share the same geographic limit (PUMAs), but the 3-year and 5-year products are not just concatenations of the 1-year files. They have been re-weighted and income-denominated items are inflated to the last year (e.g., 2013). [See explanatory note from IPUMS].

The ACS 3-year Demographic Estimates are History
Brendan Buff | APDU Blog post
Feb 3, 2015

Census Bureau Statement on American Community Survey 3-Year Statistical Product
Stanford University Libraries | Ron Nakao’s Blog

America’s Middle Class

Both the New York Times Upshot and the Pew Research Center recently examined trends in middle-income households.

The Pew Research report is here.
The Upshot report is here. The related New York Times article is here.

Hispanic Segregation

Ana Swanson at WonkBlog discusses a map by William H. Frey showing the areas of the countries where Hispanics are segregated.

Unemployment and Unemployment Benefits

Ben Casselman of the FiveThirtyEight blog discusses the changing nature of unemployment and the failure of the benefit structure to keep up with those changes.

Read the full article.

The Gap in Public and Scientist’s Views on Science and Society

The Pew Research Center explores the differences between the ways scientists and the public view science and society.

Read the full article
Complete report (PDF)
Topline Questionnaire (PDF)
Interactive graphs

Millennials are projected to outnumber Baby Boomers

Richard Fry of Pew Research Center examines new released Census Bureau population projections. The generation born between 1981 and 1997 continues to grow while the Baby Boom generation (born between 1946 and 1964) is shrinking and they are expected to outnumber the Boomers this year. The comments on the article provide an interesting discussion of the boundaries of generations.

Read the full analysis.