Archive for the 'Areas (Subject)' Category

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Do You Still Trust the Census Bureau?

The New York Daily News had a typically provacative headline “Census ‘faked’ 2012 election jobs report” two nights ago. This is a serious charge and even more, it contributes fodder to those who do not trust or support the federal data infrastructure in the first place. The following is the banner above the comments section for the New York Post article – and this sentiment probably represents the early coverage of this story.

trust census bureau logo

The following is the coverage of this in chronological order (as much as possible). Note that there are some references to Jack Welch. He famously tweeted his disbelief of this particular jobs report back in 2012 [See previous coverage.]

Census ‘faked’ 2012 election jobs report
John Crudele | New York Post
November 18, 2013

If these claims by ‘reliable sources’ are proven true, the Obama administration will be dealing with another huge scandal
Becket Adams | The Blaze (founded by Glenn Beck)
November 18, 2013

Census Bureau Statement on Collection of Survey Data
November 19, 2013

Here Are Some Issues With That Report About How The Unemployment Rate Was Faked Before The 2012 Election
Joe Weisenthal | Business Insider
November 19, 2013

Was Jack Welch right? Jobs numbers under fire
Jeff Cox | CNN
November 19, 2013

Did the Census Bureau Really Fake the Jobs Report?
Jordan Weissmann | The Atlantic
November 19, 2013

Five questions about the New York Post’s unemployment story
Erik Wemple | Washington Post
November 19, 2013

Census Sees No ‘Systemic Manipulation’ of U.S. Jobs Data
Michelle Jamrisko | Bloomberg News
Nov 19, 2013

House panel to investigate unemployment data
Annalyn Kurtz | CNN Money
November 19, 2013

House probes Census over ‘fake’ results
John Crudele | New York Post
November 19, 2013

Rep. Issa gets involved in alleged Census data fabrication, demands documents: ‘These allegations are shocking’
Becket Adams | The Blaze
November 19, 2013

Monthly jobs numbers from Census Bureau may have been manipulated since ‘10 – report
RT USA
November 19, 2013

Republican House leaders to look into report on faked jobs data
Reuters News Service
November 20, 2013

Political Questions About the Jobs Report
Nelson Schwartz | New York Times
November 20, 2013

Census Bureau: No systematic manipulation of jobs data
Paul Davidson | USA Today
November 20, 2013

Population ageing: the timebomb that isn’t?

In the November 12, 2013 issue of the British Medical Journal “Jeroen Spijker and John MacInnes argue that current measures of population ageing are misleading and that the numbers of dependent older people in the UK and other countries have actually been falling in recent years.”

Read the full text here.

Labor Force Characteristics by Race and Ethnicity, 2012

Bureau of Labor Statistics Report, October 2013 (PDF):

In 2012, the unemployment rate for the United States was 8.1 percent; however, the rate varied across race and ethnicity groups. The rates were highest for Blacks (13.8 percent) and for American Indians and Alaska Natives (12.3 percent) and lowest for Asians (5.9 percent) and for Whites (7.2 percent). The jobless rate was 10.3 percent for Hispanics, 11.8 percent for Native Hawaiians and Other Pacific Islanders, and 11.9 percent for people of Two or More Races.

Differences in labor force characteristics emerge when the race and ethnicity groups are compared. These differences reflect a variety of factors, not all of which are measurable. These factors include variations across the groups in educational attainment; the occupations and industries in which the groups work; the geographic areas of the country in which the groups are concentrated, including whether they tend to reside in urban or rural settings; and the degree of discrimination encountered in the workplace.

See also: The Workforce Is Even More Divided by Race Than you Think in The Atlantic.

Elderly Immigrants in the United States

From the publication website:

In 2010, more than one in eight U.S. adults ages 65 and older were foreign-born, a share that is expected to continue to grow. The U.S. elderly immigrant population rose from 2.7 million in 1990 to 4.6 million in 2010, a 70 percent increase in 20 years (see figure). This issue of Today’s Research on Aging reviews recent research examining older immigrants in the United States, conducted by National Institute on Aging (NIA)-supported researchers and others. Understanding both the unique characteristics of elderly foreign-born adults and the challenges some of them face is important as policymakers and planners address the well-being and health of the United States’ aging population.

The U.S. Foreign-Born Population Ages 65+ Increased Substantially Between 1990 and 2010.

graph depicting U.S. foreign born population
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, historical census data 1950-2000; and Current Population Survey, 2010.

Download the full report (PDF)

PRB Webinar – The Economic and Social Consequences of Job Loss and Unemployment

Wednesday, November 20, 2013, 1-2 pm.

From the announcement:

In this webinar, Jennie E. Brand, Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the California Center for Population Research (CCPR) at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Till von Wachter, Associate Professor of Economics and Faculty Affiliate of CCPR at UCLA, will discuss some of the short- and long-term consequences of job loss and unemployment for families in the United States. Their discussion will be followed by 10-15 minutes of Q&A.

This webinar is provided by PRB’s Center for Public Information on Population Research, with funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Joining the online webinar is free. Participants who choose to listen to the audio via telephone are responsible for their own standard long-distance rates.

Space is limited. Click here to register or go to (https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/427354601)

System requirements for attending the webinar:
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server
Mac®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.6 or newer
Mobile attendees
Required: iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phone or Android tablet

Demolition as an Urban Strategy

Via The New York Times
by: Timothy Williams

Large-scale destruction is well known in Detroit, but it is also underway in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Buffalo and others at a total cost of more than $250 million. Officials are tearing down tens of thousands of vacant buildings, many habitable, as they seek to stimulate economic growth, reduce crime and blight, and increase environmental sustainability.

Full NYT story
Brookings Report (2012)
Berkeley Report (published in 2012 in the Yale Law Journal)

Conference: Aging in America

The 2014 Annual Conference of the American Society on Aging will be March 11-15 in San Diego, CA. Visit the website for more information.

View the announcement online. Or download a PDF.

The 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College announces the 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for research on retirement income and policy, funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Grant Awards

Up to two grants of $45,000 will be awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants are required to complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. A select group of grant winners will be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, DC or Baltimore.

Submission

The submission deadline for the 2014 Sandell Grant Program is February 14, 2013. Download this year’s proposal guidelines and budget matrix.

Previous Awardees include Lauren Hersch Nicholas.

See the website for more information or to submit an application.

Top Colleges Are More Diverse Than 20 Years Ago

Elite Institutions: Far More Diverse Than They Were 20 Years Ago
By: Seth Zweifler
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

The nation’s most selective colleges have become significantly more diverse over the past 20 years, a Chronicle analysis of U.S. Education Department data shows. Research universities are more diverse than liberal-arts colleges—and, not unexpectedly, public research universities in racially diverse states like California have made greater gains in diversity than have those in Midwestern states.

Full text
Diversity at Research Universities, 1992-2012
Diversity at Liberal-Arts Colleges, 1992-2012
Race, Ethnicity, and Gender of Full-Time Faculty at More Than 4,300 Institutions

Count your blessings; you could live in Canada

The following are articles, mostly from the Canadian press about the (a) the quality of data in the National Household Survey (NHS); and (b) the politicization of funding for basic science research. Much of the poor quality of the NHS data has to do with design changes at the behest of the prime minister’s office, rather than the statistical experts at Statistics Canada.

[Criticism of the National Household Survey]
To restore faith in Statscan, free the Chief Statistician
Munir Sheikh | The Globe and Mail
October 24, 2013
This op-ed is written by the former Chief Statistician who resigned amid the changes in the design of the National Household Survey. He could not agree with the statements coming from the Prime Minister that a voluntary survey can be a substitute for a mandatory survey. Here’s his resignation letter with the famous “It can not” sentence:

And that’s all he wrote. . . Munir Sheikh resigns as Chief Statistician
Kady O’Malley | CBC
July 21, 2010
[Resignation letter]

Canada’s voluntary census is worthless. Here’s why
D. Hulchanski, R. Murdie, A. Walks, and L. Bourne | Globe and Mail
October 4, 2013
Data from the NHS show that Canada’s income inequality has dropped. But, this may have more to do with the flawed NHS than reality. The authors compare tax receipt data to NHS data to illustrate the problem.

Canadian income data ‘is garbage’ without census, experts say
Tavia Grant | The Globe and Mail
October 4, 2013

[Politicization of Science Funding]
Blinded to science: The plight of basic research in Canada
Josh D. Neufeld iPolitics Insight
October 21, 2013
This piece is a good summary of the move by the Canadian government towards funding applied research instead of basic research. This statement summarizes the issue:

Basic research is the seed corn of the economy, generating the applications and economic benefits of tomorrow … Trouble is, it’s very difficult to predict which basic research programs and projects will lead to the innovations of tomorrow.

Others from the series of posts on science policy in Canada can be found here:

Series of Posts on Science Policy in Canada
to be published in iPolitics