Archive for the 'Aging' Category

The Aging of Student Debt

Student-Loan Debt Skyrockets for Elderly, Government Report Says
By Max Lewontin
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

People over 65 make up a small percentage of borrowers with student loans, but the amount of debt held by older Americans has increased sixfold in less than a decade. Those borrowers held $2.8-billion in student-loan debt in 2005 and $18.2-billion in 2013, according to a report released on Wednesday by the Government Accountability Office.

Read the full article
GAO Report Highlights; download PDF

PRB Interview with Doug Wolf on Late-Life Disability and Long-Term Care

From the website:

(June 2014) Douglas Wolf discussed disability and long-term care policy in the U.S. with Marlene Lee, PRB program director for Academic Research and Relations. Wolf is the Gerald B. Cramer Professor of Aging Studies in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and director of the Center for Aging & Policy Research at Syracuse University.

View the video

NIH adds substantial set of genetic, health information to online database

Researchers will now have access to genetic data linked to medical information on a diverse group of more than 78,000 people, enabling investigations into many diseases and conditions. The data, from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse genomics projects — Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging (GERA) — have just been made available to qualified researchers through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), an online genetics database of the National Institutes of Health.

Details can found here.

Population ageing: the timebomb that isn’t?

In the November 12, 2013 issue of the British Medical Journal “Jeroen Spijker and John MacInnes argue that current measures of population ageing are misleading and that the numbers of dependent older people in the UK and other countries have actually been falling in recent years.”

Read the full text here.

Elderly Immigrants in the United States

From the publication website:

In 2010, more than one in eight U.S. adults ages 65 and older were foreign-born, a share that is expected to continue to grow. The U.S. elderly immigrant population rose from 2.7 million in 1990 to 4.6 million in 2010, a 70 percent increase in 20 years (see figure). This issue of Today’s Research on Aging reviews recent research examining older immigrants in the United States, conducted by National Institute on Aging (NIA)-supported researchers and others. Understanding both the unique characteristics of elderly foreign-born adults and the challenges some of them face is important as policymakers and planners address the well-being and health of the United States’ aging population.

The U.S. Foreign-Born Population Ages 65+ Increased Substantially Between 1990 and 2010.

graph depicting U.S. foreign born population
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, historical census data 1950-2000; and Current Population Survey, 2010.

Download the full report (PDF)

Conference: Aging in America

The 2014 Annual Conference of the American Society on Aging will be March 11-15 in San Diego, CA. Visit the website for more information.

View the announcement online. Or download a PDF.

The 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College announces the 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for research on retirement income and policy, funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Grant Awards

Up to two grants of $45,000 will be awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants are required to complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. A select group of grant winners will be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, DC or Baltimore.

Submission

The submission deadline for the 2014 Sandell Grant Program is February 14, 2013. Download this year’s proposal guidelines and budget matrix.

Previous Awardees include Lauren Hersch Nicholas.

See the website for more information or to submit an application.

Medical Spending and Morbidity Compression

Evidence for Significant Compression of Morbidity In the Elderly U.S. Population
D. Cutler, K. Ghosh, and M. Landrum | NBER
July 2013
Using what is becoming a go-to-resource for health economists, Cutler, et.al., use data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey to examine how health is changing by time period until death. On average, they find evidence for compression of morbidity, which would help contain health-care spending. But, they do not imply that decadents lived a disease-free period up until death.

Demographic Potential: revisiting an old technique/methodology

The potential demography: a tool for evaluating differences among countries in the European Union
Gian Carlo Blangiardo and Stefania M. L. Rimoldi
Genus: Journal of Population Sciences*
Spring 2013

*This journal has just become an open access journal: http://www.genus-journal.org/

Blast from the Past

Sunday’s Washington Post had an article on the divergent amounts spent on the elderly versus children. This was the theme of Sam Preston’s 1984 PAA Presidential address:

Feds spend $7 on elderly for every $1 on kids
Ezra Klein | Washington Post (WonkBlog)
February 15, 2013
The bulk of this article is based on a report from the Urban Institute.

Kids’ Share 2012: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children Through 2011
Julia Isaacs, et.al. | The Urban Institute

Children and the Elderly: Divergent Paths for America’s Dependents
Sam Preston | Demography
November 1984