Archive for the 'Aging' Category

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The 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College announces the 2014 Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for research on retirement income and policy, funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration. Priority areas include:

  • Social Security
  • Macroeconomic analyses of Social Security
  • Wealth and retirement income
  • Program interactions
  • International research
  • Demographic research

Grant Awards

Up to two grants of $45,000 will be awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants are required to complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. A select group of grant winners will be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, DC or Baltimore.

Submission

The submission deadline for the 2014 Sandell Grant Program is February 14, 2013. Download this year’s proposal guidelines and budget matrix.

Previous Awardees include Lauren Hersch Nicholas.

See the website for more information or to submit an application.

Medical Spending and Morbidity Compression

Evidence for Significant Compression of Morbidity In the Elderly U.S. Population
D. Cutler, K. Ghosh, and M. Landrum | NBER
July 2013
Using what is becoming a go-to-resource for health economists, Cutler, et.al., use data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey to examine how health is changing by time period until death. On average, they find evidence for compression of morbidity, which would help contain health-care spending. But, they do not imply that decadents lived a disease-free period up until death.

Demographic Potential: revisiting an old technique/methodology

The potential demography: a tool for evaluating differences among countries in the European Union
Gian Carlo Blangiardo and Stefania M. L. Rimoldi
Genus: Journal of Population Sciences*
Spring 2013

*This journal has just become an open access journal: http://www.genus-journal.org/

Blast from the Past

Sunday’s Washington Post had an article on the divergent amounts spent on the elderly versus children. This was the theme of Sam Preston’s 1984 PAA Presidential address:

Feds spend $7 on elderly for every $1 on kids
Ezra Klein | Washington Post (WonkBlog)
February 15, 2013
The bulk of this article is based on a report from the Urban Institute.

Kids’ Share 2012: Report on Federal Expenditures on Children Through 2011
Julia Isaacs, et.al. | The Urban Institute

Children and the Elderly: Divergent Paths for America’s Dependents
Sam Preston | Demography
November 1984

Getting to the Root of Aging

Getting to the Root of Aging by Annette Baudisch and James W. Vaupel
from recent issue of Science

As people live longer, the question arises of how malleable aging is and whether it can be slowed or postponed. The classic evolutionary theories of aging (1—4) provide the theoretical framework that has guided aging research for 60 years. Are the theories consistent with recent evidence?

Population Aging Will Have Long-Term Implications for Economy; Major Policy Changes Needed

National Academy of Sciences news release: The aging of the U.S. population will have broad economic consequences for the country, particularly for federal programs that support the elderly, and its long-term effects on all generations will be mediated by how — and how quickly — the nation responds, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Research Council. More information at http://www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=13465

The Older Population in the US: Census 2010 & Projections

Census 2010 Brief: The Older Population, 2010
Executive Summary
Census 2010 News Brief

And some projections to 2050

THE NEXT FOUR DECADES: The Older Population in the United States: 2010 to 2050
Population Estimates and Projections | Census Bureau
May 2010

Demographic Methods

Here’s a nice article that compares the demographic future of China and the US. It would be nice reading in a demographic methods course:

Demography: China’s Achilles Heel
The Economist
April 21, 2012

Was Gompertz Right After All?

Death Gets in the Way of Old-Age Gains
Carl Bialik | Wall Street Journal
March 2, 2012
This study suggests that a previously detected slowdown in mortality growth after age 88 didn’t exist among Americans born between 1875 and 1895. This finding coupled with a lower-than-expected count of U.S. centenarians in the 2010 census, has some demographers re-examining their beliefs about how well people who survive to old ages stave off death.

Mortality Measurement at Advanced Ages: A Study of the Social Security Administration Death Master File
Leonid A. Gavrilov and Natalia S. Gavrilova | North American Actuarial Journal
Volume 15, Number 4

Social Security State Quick Fact Sheets: 2011

By: AARP Research & Strategic Analysis (Surveys and Statistics)
Source: AARP

From the summary:

This set of fact sheets provides a one-page overview of quick facts on Social Security for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information is provided about each state’s older population, average personal income, Social Security beneficiaries, Social Security benefits, Social Security’s role in lifting retirees out of poverty, and Social Security’s income percentages among older residents’ income.

State Fact Sheets (2011)
2005; 2008