Archive for the 'Family, Fertility & Children' Category

Declining Teen Births in U.S.

Via Population Reference Bureau
By Heidi Worley

From the article:

(June 2014) Births to U.S. teenage girls ages 15 to 17 have decreased by 63 percent over the past 20 years (from 39 per 1,000 teens in 1991 to 14 per 1,000 teens in 2012), according to the latest statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). With an 8 percent decline between 2011 and 2012, the birth rate for teens ages 15 to 17 is at its lowest level ever recorded in the United States.

Full text of article

Vital Signs: Births to Teens Aged 15-17 Years — United States, 1991-2012, from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Births: Final Data for 2012, National Vital Statistics Report 62(9) (PDF)

Two Reports from the PRB On Malawi’s Population Structure

Malawi’s Pathway to a Demographic Dividend.
“Over the past decade, countries throughout Africa have experienced sustained economic growth. Despite this growth, almost two of every three people—or 600 million—are still living on less than $2 per day. Like many of its neighbours, Malawi experienced consistent economic growth during the mid-2000s, though this growth had little effect on poverty.”
Download full report (PDF).

A Vision for the Health and Well-Being of Malawi’s Young People.
“Malawi’s large population of young people has special significance for national development. Today, Malawi has the largest population of youth in its history, accounting for 40 percent of Malawi’s total population (16.3 million people).”
Download full report (PDF).

See also: 2012 PRB article, Why Population Matters to Malawi’s Development.

Finding “war brides” in the ACS

Several years ago the Census Bureau added a “what year were you married” question to the American Community Survey. This was an uncontroversial change to the questionnaire because it helped shore up data on marriages.

See link from the IPUMS for all the new marriage/divorce timing variables

The CDC used to collate marriage and divorce certificate data from state vital statistics offices, but ceased this operation in the mid-1990s due to budgetary constraints [See sad note to this effect].

Here is a nice illustration from Philip Cohen’s Family Inequality blog on using these data to find out how many World War II “war brides” are still alive.

How many WWII war brides are still living?
Philip Cohen | Family Inequality blog
April 14, 2014

If you don’t like his definition of a war bride, make your own and write it up in your own blog.

The Measure Demographic Health Surveys Changes Name and Scope

DHS Program Logo
From the new DHS Program blog:

[So in 2013,] when USAID’s MEASURE umbrella ceased to be, it was clear that we needed to be something more than simply “DHS”. But what? At first glance, “The Demographic and Health Surveys Program” or “The DHS Program” seems like an innocuous project name. But to us, it represents a lot more.

As a Program, we are representing not one contract with USAID, but 30 years of data collection in more than 90 countries.

As a Program, we are not just our flagship household survey, but a suite of surveys, data management, biomarker testing and GIS and research activities.

As a Program, we encompass far more than just data collection, but are charged with strengthening capacity, communicating complex information, analyzing data, and ensuring that DHS data are used to inform decisions all over the globe to improve the health of families and communities.

Read the full announcement.

New DHS Program website

Decomposition of Future Population Growth

From the UNFPA website:

The main objective of the decomposition tool is to provide evidence and analysis that countries can use to develop policies and programmes aimed to find a balance between demographic change and social, economic and environmental goals.

This program calculates the contributions of different demographic factors (wanted and un-wanted fertility, mortality, migration, and age structure) to population growth. It is based on the medium variant population projection of the United Nations from 2010 to 2050 for all countries and main regions.

Select a country or region from the window below to view the results of the decomposition tool. Move mouse over the figures to explore the interactive data content. Then read and download a report summarizing the results, methods, and policy implications.

Learn more and use the tool on the website.

The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the U.S.

Source: The Equality of Opportunity Project
By: Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez, Nicholas Turner

From website:

Is America the “Land of Opportunity”? In two recent studies, we find that: (1) Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families. (2) Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries.

Executive Summary (PDF) | NBER Working Paper (PDF)
New York Times Interactive Map | Washington Post Interactive Map

Related: A new survey from Pew Research Center and USA Today finds that 65% of adults believe the gap between the rich and and everyone else has grown, but disagree on government intervention.
Pew Research Press Release | Pew Research Report (PDF) | Questionnaire (PDF)
USA Today Story

Plan B: Recommended Readings

In yesterday’s brown bag, Jim Trussell recommended reading some of the coverage of the Plan B, FDA, political interference story in the New York Times. I have listed a few of the articles on this issue. The article that reports on the judge in these cases, Korman, is dated June 14, 2013. The articles are listed in most recent to oldest order. You can waste a lot of time reading the comments, so be judicious.

New Birth Control Label Counters Lawsuit Claim
Pam Belluck | New York Times
November 27, 2013

F.D.A. Grants Exclusivity to Plan B One-Step
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 24, 2013

Behind Scolding of the F.D.A., a Complex and Gentle Judge
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 14, 2013

Federal Plan for ‘Morning After’ Pill’s Sale Is Approved
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 13, 2013

Obama Waves White Flag in Contraceptive Battle
By Michael Shear | New York Times
June 12, 2013

Lifting Restrictions of ‘Morning After’ Pill has Little Impact for Drug Maker
Katie Thomas | New York Times
June 11, 2013

U.S. Drops Bid to Limit Sales of Morning-After Pill
Michael Shear and Pam Belluck
June 10, 2013

Judge Orders All Restrictions Lifted on Some ‘Morning-After’ Pills
Pam Belluck and Michael Shear
June 5, 2013

Temporary Limit Put on Sales of Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
May 13, 2013

U.S. to Defend Age Limits on Morning-After Pill Sales
Pam Belluck and Michael Shear | New York Times
May 1, 2013

Drug Agency Lowers Age for Next-Day Birth Control
Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 30, 2013

Judge Strikes Down Age Limits on Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 5, 2013

Good Sense on the Morning-After Pill
The Editorial Board | New York Times
April 5, 2013

Abortion Qualms on Morning-After Pill May Be Unfounded
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 5, 2012

Drug’s Nickname May Have Aided Politicization
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 5, 2012

Religious Groups Equate Abortion With Some Contraceptives
Pam Belluck and Erik Eckholm | New York Times
February 16, 2012

Obama Endorses Decision to Limit Morning-After Pill
Jackie Calmes and Gardiner Harris | New York Times
December 8, 2011

More Detail on Risk Urged for a Contraceptive Label
Pamm Belluck | New York Times
December 8, 2011

Massachusetts: Governor Overruled On Pill Bill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
September 16, 2005

Massachusetts Veto Seeks to Curb Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
July 26, 2005

Pharmacies Balk on After-Sex Pill and Widen Fight in Many States
Monica Davey and Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 19, 2005

Demographer/Blogger

Philip Cohen from the University of Maryland has a blog – Family Inequality. Some of his posts are picked up by The Atlantic and Sociological Images. His most recent foray into reaching the public is in a New York Times op-ed. Read it. It uses data – graphs reproduced below.

Philip Cohen has some ties to PSC as he wrote a very nice remembrance of PSC alumni Suzanne Bianchi on his blog. They overlapped at Maryland.

How Can We Jump-Start the Struggle for Gender Equality?
Philip Cohen | Opionator Blog [New York Times]
November 23, 2013

male vs female graphs

Visualizing Births and Deaths in Real-Time

Data visualizations are becoming more and more popular and sometimes they include demographic concepts. The following are two simulations of births and deaths – one for the US and the other for the world.

Click on the images to start the simulations. To read more about how these were made see references below:

us_map world_map

Watch This Anxiety-Provoking Simulation of U.S. Births and Deaths
John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities
December 11, 2012

This Map Shows Where in the World People Are Dying and Being Born
John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities
October 14, 2013

World Births/Deaths Simulation – Adding World Cities
Brad Lyon | Nowhere Near Ithaca Blog
October 9, 2013

Janet Yellen, Economic Demographer

Janet Yellen was nominated as the first female head of the Federal Reserve yesterday [note, that Rand Paul has put a hold on the nomination] . Here is a paper she and her husband George Ackerloff wrote almost 20-years ago on the increase in unmarried childbearing:

An Analysis of Out-Of-Wedlock Births in the United States
George Ackerloff and Janet Yellen | Brookings Review
Fall 1996
This Policy Brief was prepared for the Fall 1996 issue of the Brookings Review and adapted from “An Analysis of Out-of-Wedlock Childbearing in the United States,” which appeared in the May 1996 issue of the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Also of interest is a news story about Ackerloff in the mid-1980s on “efficiency wages” based on their experience hiring babysitters:

Why Unemployment Sometimes Lingers On Stirs Renewed Interest
Alan Murray | Wall Street Journal
December 26, 1985
Note that a young Larry Summers (age 30) is mentioned in this piece. Sticky wages are also mentioned in this summary of her appointment in the New York Times:

Yellen’s Path From Liberal Theorist to Fed Voice for Jobs
Binyamin Appelbaum | New York Times
October 9, 2013
As thorough as this piece is, it fails to mention that Charlie Brown was a teaching assistant for her at Harvard.