Archive for the 'Family, Fertility & Children' Category

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The Measure Demographic Health Surveys Changes Name and Scope

DHS Program Logo
From the new DHS Program blog:

[So in 2013,] when USAID’s MEASURE umbrella ceased to be, it was clear that we needed to be something more than simply “DHS”. But what? At first glance, “The Demographic and Health Surveys Program” or “The DHS Program” seems like an innocuous project name. But to us, it represents a lot more.

As a Program, we are representing not one contract with USAID, but 30 years of data collection in more than 90 countries.

As a Program, we are not just our flagship household survey, but a suite of surveys, data management, biomarker testing and GIS and research activities.

As a Program, we encompass far more than just data collection, but are charged with strengthening capacity, communicating complex information, analyzing data, and ensuring that DHS data are used to inform decisions all over the globe to improve the health of families and communities.

Read the full announcement.

New DHS Program website

Decomposition of Future Population Growth

From the UNFPA website:

The main objective of the decomposition tool is to provide evidence and analysis that countries can use to develop policies and programmes aimed to find a balance between demographic change and social, economic and environmental goals.

This program calculates the contributions of different demographic factors (wanted and un-wanted fertility, mortality, migration, and age structure) to population growth. It is based on the medium variant population projection of the United Nations from 2010 to 2050 for all countries and main regions.

Select a country or region from the window below to view the results of the decomposition tool. Move mouse over the figures to explore the interactive data content. Then read and download a report summarizing the results, methods, and policy implications.

Learn more and use the tool on the website.

The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the U.S.

Source: The Equality of Opportunity Project
By: Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez, Nicholas Turner

From website:

Is America the “Land of Opportunity”? In two recent studies, we find that: (1) Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families. (2) Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries.

Executive Summary (PDF) | NBER Working Paper (PDF)
New York Times Interactive Map | Washington Post Interactive Map

Related: A new survey from Pew Research Center and USA Today finds that 65% of adults believe the gap between the rich and and everyone else has grown, but disagree on government intervention.
Pew Research Press Release | Pew Research Report (PDF) | Questionnaire (PDF)
USA Today Story

Plan B: Recommended Readings

In yesterday’s brown bag, Jim Trussell recommended reading some of the coverage of the Plan B, FDA, political interference story in the New York Times. I have listed a few of the articles on this issue. The article that reports on the judge in these cases, Korman, is dated June 14, 2013. The articles are listed in most recent to oldest order. You can waste a lot of time reading the comments, so be judicious.

New Birth Control Label Counters Lawsuit Claim
Pam Belluck | New York Times
November 27, 2013

F.D.A. Grants Exclusivity to Plan B One-Step
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 24, 2013

Behind Scolding of the F.D.A., a Complex and Gentle Judge
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 14, 2013

Federal Plan for ‘Morning After’ Pill’s Sale Is Approved
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 13, 2013

Obama Waves White Flag in Contraceptive Battle
By Michael Shear | New York Times
June 12, 2013

Lifting Restrictions of ‘Morning After’ Pill has Little Impact for Drug Maker
Katie Thomas | New York Times
June 11, 2013

U.S. Drops Bid to Limit Sales of Morning-After Pill
Michael Shear and Pam Belluck
June 10, 2013

Judge Orders All Restrictions Lifted on Some ‘Morning-After’ Pills
Pam Belluck and Michael Shear
June 5, 2013

Temporary Limit Put on Sales of Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
May 13, 2013

U.S. to Defend Age Limits on Morning-After Pill Sales
Pam Belluck and Michael Shear | New York Times
May 1, 2013

Drug Agency Lowers Age for Next-Day Birth Control
Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 30, 2013

Judge Strikes Down Age Limits on Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 5, 2013

Good Sense on the Morning-After Pill
The Editorial Board | New York Times
April 5, 2013

Abortion Qualms on Morning-After Pill May Be Unfounded
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 5, 2012

Drug’s Nickname May Have Aided Politicization
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 5, 2012

Religious Groups Equate Abortion With Some Contraceptives
Pam Belluck and Erik Eckholm | New York Times
February 16, 2012

Obama Endorses Decision to Limit Morning-After Pill
Jackie Calmes and Gardiner Harris | New York Times
December 8, 2011

More Detail on Risk Urged for a Contraceptive Label
Pamm Belluck | New York Times
December 8, 2011

Massachusetts: Governor Overruled On Pill Bill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
September 16, 2005

Massachusetts Veto Seeks to Curb Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
July 26, 2005

Pharmacies Balk on After-Sex Pill and Widen Fight in Many States
Monica Davey and Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 19, 2005

Demographer/Blogger

Philip Cohen from the University of Maryland has a blog – Family Inequality. Some of his posts are picked up by The Atlantic and Sociological Images. His most recent foray into reaching the public is in a New York Times op-ed. Read it. It uses data – graphs reproduced below.

Philip Cohen has some ties to PSC as he wrote a very nice remembrance of PSC alumni Suzanne Bianchi on his blog. They overlapped at Maryland.

How Can We Jump-Start the Struggle for Gender Equality?
Philip Cohen | Opionator Blog [New York Times]
November 23, 2013

male vs female graphs

Visualizing Births and Deaths in Real-Time

Data visualizations are becoming more and more popular and sometimes they include demographic concepts. The following are two simulations of births and deaths – one for the US and the other for the world.

Click on the images to start the simulations. To read more about how these were made see references below:

us_map world_map

Watch This Anxiety-Provoking Simulation of U.S. Births and Deaths
John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities
December 11, 2012

This Map Shows Where in the World People Are Dying and Being Born
John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities
October 14, 2013

World Births/Deaths Simulation – Adding World Cities
Brad Lyon | Nowhere Near Ithaca Blog
October 9, 2013

Janet Yellen, Economic Demographer

Janet Yellen was nominated as the first female head of the Federal Reserve yesterday [note, that Rand Paul has put a hold on the nomination] . Here is a paper she and her husband George Ackerloff wrote almost 20-years ago on the increase in unmarried childbearing:

An Analysis of Out-Of-Wedlock Births in the United States
George Ackerloff and Janet Yellen | Brookings Review
Fall 1996
This Policy Brief was prepared for the Fall 1996 issue of the Brookings Review and adapted from “An Analysis of Out-of-Wedlock Childbearing in the United States,” which appeared in the May 1996 issue of the Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Also of interest is a news story about Ackerloff in the mid-1980s on “efficiency wages” based on their experience hiring babysitters:

Why Unemployment Sometimes Lingers On Stirs Renewed Interest
Alan Murray | Wall Street Journal
December 26, 1985
Note that a young Larry Summers (age 30) is mentioned in this piece. Sticky wages are also mentioned in this summary of her appointment in the New York Times:

Yellen’s Path From Liberal Theorist to Fed Voice for Jobs
Binyamin Appelbaum | New York Times
October 9, 2013
As thorough as this piece is, it fails to mention that Charlie Brown was a teaching assistant for her at Harvard.

New Data: Unintended Childbearing/Abortion Psychology

What Happens to Women Who Are Denied Abortions?
Joshua Lang | New York Times
June 12, 2013
This reports on the Turnaway Study [described below], but as is typical with a piece in the popular press it personifies the data. Here’s the gist of the article:

Most studies on the effects of abortion compare women who have abortions with those who choose to carry their pregnancies to term. It is like comparing people who are divorced with people who stay married, instead of people who get the divorce they want with the people who don’t. Foster saw this as a fundamental flaw. By choosing the right comparison groups — women who obtain abortions just before the gestational deadline versus women who miss that deadline and are turned away — Foster hoped to paint a more accurate picture. Do the physical, psychological and socioeconomic outcomes for these two groups of women differ? Which is safer for them, abortion or childbirth? Which causes more depression and anxiety? “I tried to measure all the ways in which I thought having a baby might make you worse off,” Foster says, “and the ways in which having a baby might make you better off, and the same with having an abortion.

The Turnaway Study
ANSRH | University of California, San Francisco
The Turnaway Study is ANSIRH’s prospective longitudinal study examining the effects of unintended pregnancy on women’s lives. The major aim of the study is to describe the mental health, physical health, and socioeconomic consequences of receiving an abortion compared to carrying an unwanted pregnancy to term. From 2008 to 2010, we collaborated with 30 abortion facilities around the country—from Maine to Washington, Texas to Minnesota—to recruit over 1,000 women who sought abortions, some who received abortions because they presented for care under the gestational limit of the clinic and some who were “turned away” and carried to term because they were past the gestational limit.

Family Demography in the News

Below is a compilation of posts about family formation and childbearing. The last piece is less on marriage and childbearing and instead focuses on the “mom penalty” in academia.

How to Live in a World Where Marriage Is in Decline
Philip Cohen | The Atlantic
June 4, 2013
This piece examines trends in marriage over time in the US and discusses the policy implications of this to the “marriage movement” promoters.

Rising Trend of Births Outside Marriage
Carl Haub | Population Reference Bureau
April 2013
This short piece examines international trends and concludes “What we can say for certain is that this new household structure is quite unlikely to revert to times past.”

Autumn of the Patriarchs: Traditional demographic patterns are changing astonishingly fast
The Economist
June 1, 2013
This is another international piece, based on statistics from Latin America. It shows trends in fertility rates and childlessness. And it is based on research by our old friend Ron Lesthaeghe and colleagues.

Marriage: More than a Century of Change
Julissa Cruz | National Center for Marriage and Family Research
June 2013
This is a very nice resource based on data from the US Census, American Community Survey, and the Vital Statistics system. It shows trends in marriage rates for women from 1890 to 2010.

Recent Trends in Births and Fertility Rates Through December 2012
Brady Hamilton and Paul Sutton | CDC
June 2013
The recent decline in fertility rates may have reached bottom.

Births Rise as Parents-to-Be Renew Confidence in Economy
Stephanie Armour | Bloomberg News
June 6, 2013
Based on the CDC report, U.S. birth-rate increase a sign of growing confidence in the economy

The Mom Penalty
Colleen Flaherty | Inside Higher Education
June 6, 2013
Do babies matter to academic careers? (Spoiler alert: for moms, “yes.”) based on Do Babies Matter? Gender and Family in the Ivory Tower

Sex Selection: When Technology and Tradition Collide

When Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection
Kate Gilles and Charlotte Feldman-Jacobs | Population Reference Bureau
September 2012

Bullet points from this policy brief are:

Normal sex ratios at birth range from 102 to 107 male babies born for every 100 female babies born

1.5 millions girls around the world are missing at birth every year.

In at least nine countries, the sex ratio at birth of boy babies to girl babies is at 110 or higher.