Archive for the 'Family, Fertility & Children' Category

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Household Change in the United States

Household Change in the United States
Linda Jacobsen, Mark Mather, and Genevieve Dupuis | Population Bulletin
September 2012

[Synopsis] [Full Report] [Data Finder]

This Population Bureau report describes changes in household structure in the United States from 1940 to 2010. It covers various living arrangements: married couples, single-head families, living alone, cohabiting couples, etc. with some discussion of these relationships by age, race, education.

Olympic Britain

This is a book written by researchers of the House of Commons Library and published on 10 July 2012. It tells the story of social and economic change in the UK since the two previous London Games in 1908 and 1948, using data visualisations to bring to life a period during which our standards of living, the type of work we do, our leisure activities and our lifestyles have changed almost beyond recognition, much like the Olympics itself.

Full print version including charts and tables

Press release with sub-headings like Population, Housing and home life, Income and Education, etc.

Lancet’s special issue on family planning

Lancet just published a series on the effects of population and family planning on people’s well-being and the environment. http://www.thelancet.com/series/family-planning

Households and Families: 2010

By: Daphne Lofquist, Terry Ligaila, Martin O’Connell, and Sarah Feliz
Source: United States Census Bureau

From the news release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a 2010 Census brief, Households and Families: 2010, that showed interracial or interethnic opposite-sex married couple households grew by 28 percent over the decade from 7 percent in 2000 to 10 percent in 2010. States with higher percentages of couples of a different race or Hispanic origin in 2010 were primarily located in the western and southwestern parts of the United States, along with Hawaii and Alaska.

A higher percentage of unmarried partners were interracial or interethnic than married couples. Nationally, 10 percent of opposite-sex married couples had partners of a different race or Hispanic origin, compared with 18 percent of opposite-sex unmarried partners and 21 percent of same-sex unmarried partners.

Full text (PDF)

Employment Characteristics of Families, 2011

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

From the Summary:

In 2011, 11.5 percent of families included an unemployed person, falling from a peak of 12.4 percent in 2010, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Of the nation’s 78.4 million families, 79.8 percent had at least one employed member in 2011.

These data on employment, unemployment, and family relationships are collected as part of the Current Population Survey (CPS), a monthly sample survey of approximately 60,000 households. Families are classified either as married-couple families or as families maintained by women or men without spouses present. For further information about the CPS, see the Technical Note.

Table of Contents
Full text (PDF)

Economix: On Teenage Pregnancy

Income Inequality and Teenage Pregnancy
Mokoto Rich | New York Times
April 3, 2012
Teenage childbearing is “a symptom, not a cause” of poverty and economic immobility, one researcher says.

Why is the Teen Birth Rate in the United States So High and Why Does it Matter?
Melissa Kearney and Phillip Levine | NBER Working Paper 17965
March 2012

Reproductive Health

Childbirth is Taking Longer, Study Finds
Nicholas Bakalar | New York Times
March 31, 2012

Changes in labor patterns over 50 years
S.K Laughon, D.W. Branch, J. Beaver, and Jun Zhang | American Journal of Obstretrics and Gynecology
In press, available March 10, 2012

Puberty Before Age 10: A New ‘Normal’?
Elizabeth Weil | New York Times
March 30, 2012

State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World

Cities are failing children, UNICEF warns
Source: UNICEF

From Press Release (PDF):

Urbanization leaves hundreds of millions of children in cities and towns excluded from vital services, UNICEF warns in The State of the World’s Children 2012: Children in an Urban World.

Greater urbanization is inevitable. In a few years, the report says, the majority of children will grow up in towns or cities rather than in rural areas. Children born in cities already account for 60 per cent of the increase in urban population.

“When we think of poverty, the image that traditionally comes to mind is that of a child in a rural village,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “But today, an increasing number of children living in slums and shantytowns are among the most disadvantaged and vulnerable in the world, deprived of the most basic services and denied the right to thrive.”

Report website includes tables, figures, videos and other related content.
Full report (PDF)
Executive Summary (PDF)

For Women Under 30, Most Births Occur Outside Marriage

By Jason DeParle and Sabrina Tavernise
Source: New York Times, February 17, 2012

LORAIN, Ohio — It used to be called illegitimacy. Now it is the new normal. After steadily rising for five decades, the share of children born to unmarried women has crossed a threshold: more than half of births to American women under 30 occur outside marriage.

Once largely limited to poor women and minorities, motherhood without marriage has settled deeply into middle America. The fastest growth in the last two decades has occurred among white women in their 20s who have some college education but no four-year degree, according to Child Trends, a Washington research group that analyzed government data.

New York Times Article
Child Trends Report

The Impact of Mental Health Treatment on Low-Income Mothers’ Work

By: Pamela J. Loprest and Austin Nichols
Source: Urban Institute

Abstract:

This study analyzes the impact of mental health problems and mental health treatment on low-income mothers’ employment, using the 2002 National Survey of America’s Families. We find that all mothers, low-income mothers, and low-income single mothers in very poor mental health are significantly less likely to work. Instrumental variables regressions show that mothers receiving mental health treatment are significantly more likely to work. These findings suggest that mental health problems are an important barrier to work among low-income women and that access to treatment for these problems can substantially improve the probability of work for this group.

Full text (PDF)