Archive for the 'Children, Families, and Reproductive Health' Category

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Growing Numbers of Americans Are Remarrying

Four-in-Ten Couples are Saying “I Do,” Again
By Gretchen Livingston
Source: Pew Research Social & Demographic Trends

In 2013, fully four-in-ten new marriages included at least one partner who had been married before, and two-in-ten new marriages were between people who had both previously stepped down the aisle, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of newly released data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Complete Report (PDF)

See also:
“The New American Family” in the ISR Sampler and Pam Smock’s interview on Stateside about the changing American Family

Expansion of Free Lunch Could Have a Negative Effect on Research Data

By: Ben Wieder
Source: FiveThirtyEight

A new federal initiative that could provide millions of students with a free lunch might have an unexpected cost for researchers and state educational agencies.

“It’s obviously good for kids, but from a pure data perspective it provides some weaknesses,” said Brandon LeBeau, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa’s College of Education who has studied the use of free lunch eligibility in education research.

Read the full story

2 or More Children Raises Productivity, At Least For Academic Economists

By Ylan Q. Mui
Source: Wonkblog

A word of encouragement for my working moms: You are actually more productive than your childless peers.

That’s the conclusion of a recent study from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, which found that over the course of a 30-year career, mothers outperformed women without children at almost every stage of the game. In fact, mothers with at least two kids were the most productive of all.

Full story on Wonkblog
Parenthood and Productivity of Highly Skilled Labor, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Working Paper

The Economics of Parenting

By: Roberto A. Ferdman
Source: Wonkblog (Washington Post)

Strict parents — the sort who practice an authoritarian form of parenting that restricts children’s choices — are more common in countries with high inequality, according to a study by the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study used the World Value Survey to measure whether parents in different countries care more about qualities desired by stricter parents, like “hard work” and “obedience,” or qualities desired more by passive parents, like “imagination” and “independence.

It found that the more unequal a society, the more likely people were to favor strict parenting.

Wonkblog post
NBER Working Paper (PDF)

Never-Married Adults Is at a Record High

Via: Pew Research
By: Wendy Wang and Kim Parker

After decades of declining marriage rates and changes in family structure, the share of American adults who have never been married is at an historic high. In 2012, one-in-five adults ages 25 and older (about 42 million people) had never been married, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of census data. In 1960, only about one-in-ten adults (9%) in that age range had never been married. Men are more likely than women to have never been married (23% vs. 17% in 2012). And this gender gap has widened since 1960, when 10% of men ages 25 and older and 8% of women of the same age had never married.

Report summary
Complete Report (PDF)

Also read NPR’s Code Switch coverage of the report.

Fewer Marriages, More Divergence: Marriage Projections for Millennials to Age 40

By: Steven Martin, Nan Astone, Elizabeth Peters
Source: Urban Institute

Abstract:

Declining marriage rates suggest a growing fraction of millennials will remain unmarried through age 40. In this brief, we use data from the American Community Survey to estimate age-specific marriage rates and project the percentage of millennials who will marry by age 40 in different scenarios. We find that the percentage of millennials marrying by age 40 will fall lower than for any previous generation of Americans, even in a scenario where marriage rates recover considerably. Moreover, marriage patterns will continue to diverge by education and race, increasing the divides between mostly married “haves” and increasingly single “have-nots”.

Download full report

Declining Teen Births in U.S.

Via Population Reference Bureau
By Heidi Worley

From the article:

(June 2014) Births to U.S. teenage girls ages 15 to 17 have decreased by 63 percent over the past 20 years (from 39 per 1,000 teens in 1991 to 14 per 1,000 teens in 2012), according to the latest statistics released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). With an 8 percent decline between 2011 and 2012, the birth rate for teens ages 15 to 17 is at its lowest level ever recorded in the United States.

Full text of article

Vital Signs: Births to Teens Aged 15-17 Years — United States, 1991-2012, from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Births: Final Data for 2012, National Vital Statistics Report 62(9) (PDF)

The Chronicle Review Special Issue on Inequality

Full table of contents are here. Some highlights include:

Capital Man
by Emily Eakin
Thomas Piketty is economics’ biggest sensation. He’s also the field’s fiercest critic.

Campus Reflection
by John Quiggin
Inequalities in higher education mirror those in society at large.

Is Wedlock for the Weathy?
by June Carbone and Naomi Cahn
Marriage is waning among the poor and increasing among the affluent, but the law hasn’t kept up with those trends.

Impoverished Thinking
Interview by Peter Monaghan
Sendhil Mullainathan discusses scarcity and the economic mind.

Finding “war brides” in the ACS

Several years ago the Census Bureau added a “what year were you married” question to the American Community Survey. This was an uncontroversial change to the questionnaire because it helped shore up data on marriages.

See link from the IPUMS for all the new marriage/divorce timing variables

The CDC used to collate marriage and divorce certificate data from state vital statistics offices, but ceased this operation in the mid-1990s due to budgetary constraints [See sad note to this effect].

Here is a nice illustration from Philip Cohen’s Family Inequality blog on using these data to find out how many World War II “war brides” are still alive.

How many WWII war brides are still living?
Philip Cohen | Family Inequality blog
April 14, 2014

If you don’t like his definition of a war bride, make your own and write it up in your own blog.

Plan B: Recommended Readings

In yesterday’s brown bag, Jim Trussell recommended reading some of the coverage of the Plan B, FDA, political interference story in the New York Times. I have listed a few of the articles on this issue. The article that reports on the judge in these cases, Korman, is dated June 14, 2013. The articles are listed in most recent to oldest order. You can waste a lot of time reading the comments, so be judicious.

New Birth Control Label Counters Lawsuit Claim
Pam Belluck | New York Times
November 27, 2013

F.D.A. Grants Exclusivity to Plan B One-Step
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 24, 2013

Behind Scolding of the F.D.A., a Complex and Gentle Judge
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 14, 2013

Federal Plan for ‘Morning After’ Pill’s Sale Is Approved
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 13, 2013

Obama Waves White Flag in Contraceptive Battle
By Michael Shear | New York Times
June 12, 2013

Lifting Restrictions of ‘Morning After’ Pill has Little Impact for Drug Maker
Katie Thomas | New York Times
June 11, 2013

U.S. Drops Bid to Limit Sales of Morning-After Pill
Michael Shear and Pam Belluck
June 10, 2013

Judge Orders All Restrictions Lifted on Some ‘Morning-After’ Pills
Pam Belluck and Michael Shear
June 5, 2013

Temporary Limit Put on Sales of Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
May 13, 2013

U.S. to Defend Age Limits on Morning-After Pill Sales
Pam Belluck and Michael Shear | New York Times
May 1, 2013

Drug Agency Lowers Age for Next-Day Birth Control
Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 30, 2013

Judge Strikes Down Age Limits on Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 5, 2013

Good Sense on the Morning-After Pill
The Editorial Board | New York Times
April 5, 2013

Abortion Qualms on Morning-After Pill May Be Unfounded
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 5, 2012

Drug’s Nickname May Have Aided Politicization
Pam Belluck | New York Times
June 5, 2012

Religious Groups Equate Abortion With Some Contraceptives
Pam Belluck and Erik Eckholm | New York Times
February 16, 2012

Obama Endorses Decision to Limit Morning-After Pill
Jackie Calmes and Gardiner Harris | New York Times
December 8, 2011

More Detail on Risk Urged for a Contraceptive Label
Pamm Belluck | New York Times
December 8, 2011

Massachusetts: Governor Overruled On Pill Bill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
September 16, 2005

Massachusetts Veto Seeks to Curb Morning-After Pill
Pam Belluck | New York Times
July 26, 2005

Pharmacies Balk on After-Sex Pill and Widen Fight in Many States
Monica Davey and Pam Belluck | New York Times
April 19, 2005