Archive for the 'Family, Fertility & Children' Category

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Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972–2009

Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 1972–2009
By: Chris Chapman, Jennifer Laird, Nicole Ifill and Angelina KewalRamani
Source: National Center for Education Statistics

Description:

This report updates a series of NCES reports on high school dropout and completion rates that began in 1988. The report includes national and regional population estimates for the percentage of students who dropped out of high school between 2008 and 2009, the percentage of young people who were dropouts in 2009, and the percentage of young people who were not in high school and had some form of high school credential in 2009. Data are presented by a number of characteristics including race/ethnicity, sex, and age. Annual data for these population estimates are provided for the 1972-2009 period. Information about the high school class of 2009 is also presented in the form on on-time graduation rates from public high schools.

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Child well-being in the UK, Spain and Sweden

Child well-being in the UK, Spain and Sweden: The role of inequality and materialism
By: Ipsos Mori and Agnes Nairn
Source: UNICEF UK

From Summary:

This research reveals how children and families in different societies tackle complicated issues in their everyday lives in very different ways. It clearly exposes some of the specific pressures faced by children and families in the UK, uncovering new dimensions to family life, and sheds new light on the motivations and responses of children and families when dealing with inequality and materialism.

Our findings paint a complex picture of the relationship between well-being, materialism and inequality across Spain, Sweden and the UK. Time with family and friends and activities outside the home emerge as central to children’s subjective well-being, and material goods appear to be used by children often as social enablers rather than as direct contributors to their own happiness.

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Asian demography: The flight from marriage

From the Economist

Asians are marrying later, and less, than in the past. This has profound implications for women, traditional family life and Asian politics. http://www.economist.com/node/21526329

Are Cohabiting Parents Bad For Kids?

Are Cohabiting Parents Bad For Kids?
By: Jennifer Ludden
Source: National Public Radio, Morning Edition

As more and more U.S. couples decide to have children without first getting married, a group of 18 family scholars is sounding an alarm about the impact this may have on those children.

In a new report out on Tuesday, they say research shows the children of cohabiting parents are at risk for a broad range of problems, from trouble in school to psychological stress, physical abuse and poverty.

The study is put out by the National Marriage Project and the Institute for American Values, groups whose missions include strengthening marriage and family life. It suggests a shift in focus is needed away from the children of divorce, which has long been a preoccupying concern for such scholars.

Audio and transcript are available.

The story is based on “Why Marriage Matters: Thirty Conclusions from the Social Science, 3rd edition“, from AmericanValues.org.

Role of Fathers is More Active and More Absent

A Tale of Two Fathers: More Are Active, but More are Absent
By: Gretchen Livingston and Kim Parker
Source: Pew Research Center

From Overview:

The role of fathers in the modern American family is changing in important and countervailing ways. Fathers who live with their children have become more intensely involved in their lives, spending more time with them and taking part in a greater variety of activities. However, the share of fathers who are residing with their children has fallen significantly in the past half century.Graph

In 1960, only 11% of children in the U.S. lived apart from their fathers. By 2010, that share had risen to 27%. The share of minor children living apart from their mothers increased only modestly, from 4% in 1960 to 8% in 2010.

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Head Start and the Changing Demographics of Today’s Young Children

Head Start and the Changing Demographics of Today’s Young Children
By: Oliva Golden
Source: Urban Institute

Abstract:

The increasing diversity of America’s young children has important implications for Head Start and Early Head Start programs. This paper summarizes recent changes in the racial and ethnic composition of young children, particularly increases in Hispanic and Asian children, as well as shifts in where young children live, with some northeastern and Midwestern states losing children while southern and southwestern states are rapidly gaining. Based on these trends and recent Urban Institute research, the paper makes four recommendations about how local Head Start practitioners can best meet the needs of today’s young children and their families.

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America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2011

America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2011
Source: Forum of Child and Family Statistics

From foreword:

America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2011 is a compendium of indicators depicting both the promises and the challenges confronting our Nation’s young people. The report, the 15th in an ongoing series, presents 41 key indicators on important aspects of children’s lives. These indicators are drawn from our most reliable statistics, are easily understood by broad audiences, are objectively based on substantial research, are balanced so that no single area of children’s lives dominates the report, are measured regularly so that they can be updated to show trends over time, and are representative of large segments of the population rather than one particular group.

This year’s report continues to present key indicators in seven domains: family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. The report incorporates several modifications that reflect the Forum’s efforts to improve its quality and comprehensiveness. In addition to updating data sources and substantively expanding several indicators, the report presents a special feature on adoption.

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A Tale of Two Fathers

A Tale of Two Fathers: More Are Active, but More are Absent
By: Gretchen Livingston and Kim Parker
Source: Pew Research Center, Social & Demographic Trends

From Overview:

The role of fathers in the modern American family is changing in important and countervailing ways. Fathers who live with their children have become more intensely involved in their lives, spending more time with them and taking part in a greater variety of activities. However, the share of fathers who are residing with their children has fallen significantly in the past half century.

In 1960, only 11% of children in the U.S. lived apart from their fathers. By 2010, that share had risen to 27%. The share of minor children living apart from their mothers increased only modestly, from 4% in 1960 to 8% in 2010.

According to a new Pew Research Center analysis of the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), more than one-in-four fathers with children 18 or younger now live apart from their children—with 11% living apart from some of their children and 16% living apart from all of their children.

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Millenials Value Parenthood More Than Marriage

By: Wendy Wang and Paul Taylor
Source: Pew Research Center, Social & Demographic Trends

From The Daily Number:

While parenthood and marriage have long been linked, America’s youngest generation places far more value on the former than the latter. A 52%-majority of Millennials (adults ages 18 to 29) say being a good parent is one of the most important things in their life. Just 30% say the same about having a successful marriage, meaning there is a 22-percentage-point gap in the way Millennials value parenthood over marriage. When this same question was posed to 18- to 29-year-olds in 1997, the gap was just seven percentage points. At the time, 42% of members of that generation — known as Gen X — said being a good parent is one of the most important things in life while 35% said the same about having a successful marriage. Pew Research surveys also find that Millennials are less likely than adults ages 30 and older to say that a child needs a home with both a father and mother to grow up happily and that single parenthood and unmarried couple parenthood are bad for society.

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History and Family in Britain

History and Family: Setting the Records Straight. A rebuttal to the British Academy pamphlet Happy families?
By: Rebecca Probert and Samantha Callan
Source: The Centre for Social Justice

From the press release:

Britain’s levels of births outside marriage are at the highest point for at least 200 years, according to a major new study of the history of the family from a leading think-tank. Cohabitation levels have also soared from under 5% pre-1945 to 90% today.

The inquiry finds that births outside marriage were at low levels throughout the 19th Century and stayed flat until the 1960s. But since then they have soared, from a long-standing baseline of 5 per cent to 45 per cent today.

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