Archive for the 'Group Disparities' Category

Hispanics and Education

Jens Manuel Krogstad of Pew Research Center lists 5 Facts About Latinos and Education:

Educational attainment among U.S. Latinos has been changing rapidly in recent years, reflecting the group’s growth in the nation’s public K-12 schools and colleges. Over the past decade, the Hispanic high school dropout rate has declined and college enrollment has increased, even as Hispanics trail other groups in earning a bachelor’s degree.

Family Income and College Chances

The New York Times Upshot continues to make interesting use of Raj Chetty’s Equality of Opportunity project. In an article posted today, they ask readers to draw a graph of their best guess of how family income affects children’s college chances, then explore (in real time) how other readers are guessing compared with the actual data.

PRB Webinar: Extreme Poverty and Health in the United State

When: Thursday, June 11, 2015, 1:00-2:30 pm (EDT)
Register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2329568637789737218

From the e-mail invitation:

Studies show that a growing number of U.S. families have incomes so low that the difficulties of their living situations may be masked by thinking of the poor as a homogeneous group. For instance, since the mid-1990s the number of families living on less than $2.00 in cash per person per day has more than doubled. Over the same interval, a smaller share of government social welfare spending has gone to the deeply poor.

This webinar will address issues such as how these families subsist, what public assistance they receive, and what their health challenges are. It will feature presentations from key Johns Hopkins researchers on this topic: sociologist Kathryn Edin, economist Robert Moffitt, and epidemiologist Jacky Jennings. It will be moderated by sociologist Andrew Cherlin.

Their presentations will be followed by 10-15 minutes of Q&A.

This webinar is co-hosted by the Hopkins Population Center and PRB’s Center for Public Information on Population Research, with funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

Joining the online webinar is free. Participants who choose to listen to the audio via telephone are responsible for their own standard long-distance rates.

Moving to Opportunity Update

Both the New York Times Upshot and NPR’s Planet Money have stories this morning about Raj Chetty’s Equality of Opportunity Project (previous posted about here).

Life Expectancy in Baltimore

Christopher Ingraham of Wonkblog compares the life expectancies in Baltimore neighborhoods to each other and to countries around the world.

See also: The long, painful and repetitive history of how Baltimore became Baltimore.

9 Charts about Wealth Inequality

The Urban Institute has produced 9 interactive charts describing wealth inequality over the last 50 years:

Why hasn’t wealth inequality improved over the past 50 years? And why, in particular, has the racial wealth gap not closed? These nine charts illustrate how income inequality, earnings gaps, homeownership rates, retirement savings, student loan debt, and lopsided asset-building subsidies have contributed to these growing wealth disparities.

Gender Gap in the U.S. Black Population

According to Justin Wolfers, David Leonhardt and Kevin Quealy of The Upshot, there are roughly 1.5 million black men missing from the 25 to 54 age group due to incarceration and early death. “For every 100 black women in this age group living outside of jail, there are only 83 black men. Among whites, the equivalent number is 99, nearly parity.”

Read the full story and here is the methodology.

Food Stamp Experiments

Max Ehrenfreund of Wonkblog uses Gwyneth Paltrow’s food stamp experiment to examine the barriers that people in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program actually face when trying to feed themselves and their families.

Americans in general have unhealthy diets, and they don’t buy much produce, no matter how much they earn. And shoppers on food stamps who do want to feed their families more greens don’t just have to worry about the cost, but also about finicky children, spoilage, and any number of other hassles that are just minor inconveniences for more affluent families.

Geographical Variations in Equality of Opportunity

Raj Chetty of Harvard has been leading a team of researchers (including former Population Studies Center trainee Patrick Kline) on a project examining the geography of income mobility. From the project website:

Is America the “Land of Opportunity”? In two recent studies, we find that: (1) Upward income mobility varies substantially within the U.S. [summary][paper] Areas with greater mobility tend to have five characteristics: less segregation, less income inequality, better schools, greater social capital, and more stable families. (2) Contrary to popular perception, economic mobility has not changed significantly over time; however, it is consistently lower in the U.S. than in most developed countries. [summary][paper]

See The Equality of Opportunity Project website for executive summaries, papers, city rankings, data and more.

See the New York Times’ In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters for interactive maps based on this work.

Income Inequality and Health

The New York Times Upshot looks at the County Health Rankings and Roadmap Project from University of Wisconsin and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation which studies income inequality and health at the county level.

We know that living in a poor community makes you less likely to live a long life. New evidence suggests that living in a community with high income inequality also seems to be bad for your health.

A study from researchers at the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute examined a series of risk factors that help explain the health (or sickness) of counties in the United States. In addition to the suspects you might expect — a high smoking rate, a lot of violent crime — the researchers found that people in unequal communities were more likely to die before the age of 75 than people in more equal communities, even if the average incomes were the same.

H/T Data Detectives