Archive for the 'Data & Methods' Category

Using Stata Effectively

Stata is holding three 2-day sessions for new users. Sessions are $950 with a 15% discount for group enrollments of three or more.

Description:

Become intimately familiar with all three components of Stata: data management, analysis, and graphics. This two-day course is aimed at both new Stata users and those who wish to learn techniques for efficient day-to-day use of Stata. Upon completion of the course, you will be able to use Stata efficiently for basic analyses and graphics. You will be able to do this in a reproducible manner, making collaborative changes and follow-up analyses much simpler. Finally, you will be able to make your datasets self-explanatory to your co-workers and yourself when using them in the future.

The May 24-25 and June 20-21 are in Washington, DC and the October 24-25 session is in Las Vegas.

Go to this site for more training courses.

Changing Causes of Death in Poor Countries

The World Bank has a new interactive chart showing how the leading causes of death are changing worldwide:

From The DataBlog:

Worldwide, the leading causes of death are changing, and they vary between rich and poor countries. In low-income countries, deaths from communicable diseases such as malaria and HIV/AIDS have fallen, while deaths from non-communicable diseases such as stroke and diabetes are on the rise.

Data USA

Data USA is a collaboration between Deloitte, Macro Connections at the MIT Media Lab, and Datawheel which is (according to their About page), “the most comprehensive website and visualization engine of public US Government data.” The data is pulled from sources such as the American Community Survey, the Bureau of Economic Analysis, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the visualizations are powered by D3plus, an open source visualization engine.

H/T Flowing Data

Are secondary data users research parasites?

Even though NIH and NSF both have data sharing requirements, there is clearly some resistance to it. The best example is an editorial from the New England Journal of Medicine. Secondary data users are characterized as “research parasites.”

A rebuttal comes from a Science editorial with the title #IAmAResearchParasite.

Data Sharing
Dan L. Longo and Jeffrey Drazen | N Engl J Med
January 21, 2016

#IAmAResearchParasite
Marcia McNutt | Science
March 4, 2016

Demographic and Economic Profiles of the Super Tuesday States

In advance of Super Tuesday, the U.S. Census Bureau released demographic and economic profiles of the 12 states holding primaries and caucuses:

H/T Data Detectives

Hall of Justice

The Sunlight Foundation has created a project called Hall of Justice which gathers publicly available criminal justice datasets and research.

While not comprehensive, Hall of Justice contains nearly 10,000 datasets and research documents from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories and the federal government. The data was collected between September 2014 and October 2015. We have tagged datasets so that users can search across the inventory for broad topics, ranging from death in custody to domestic violence to prison population. The inventory incorporates government as well as academic data.

H/T Flowing Data

A New FiveThirtyEight Podcast

In addition to their weekly podcast on data, What’s the Point?, as well as their sports podcast, Hot Takedown, FiveThirtyEight has launched an election podcast called, appropriately enough, FiveThirtyEight Elections.

Kaggle Datasets

Kaggle, a platform for predictive modelling and analytics competitions, introduced a section for users to download and analyze public data.

At Kaggle, we want to help the world learn from data. This sounds bold and grandiose, but the biggest barriers to this are incredibly simple. It’s tough to access data. It’s tough to understand what’s in the data once you access it. We want to change this. That’s why we’ve created a home for high quality public datasets, Kaggle Datasets.

Kaggle Datasets has four core components:

  • Access: simple, consistent access to the data with clear licensing
  • Analysis: a way to explore the data without downloading it
  • Results: visibility to the previous work that’s been created on the data
  • Conversation: forums and comments for discussing the nuances of the data

Current datasets include U.S. Baby Names, 2013 American Community Survey, May 2015 Reddit Comments, U.S. Department of Education: College Scorecard, and Ocean Ship Logbooks (1750-1850).

U.S. Census Bureau Open Source

The U.S. Census Bureau is committing to an open source policy. Their mission, “is to serve as the leading source of quality data about the nation’s people and economy. We honor privacy, protect confidentiality, share our expertise globally, and conduct our work openly. Where possible, the US Census Bureau will actively participate in open source projects aimed at increasing value to the public through our data dissemination efforts.”

Read a current list of the open source projects here.

H/T Flowing Data

Playing with Mortality Visualizations

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data has been doing some interesting (and beautiful) visualizations of when and how people die. First was Years You Have Left to Live, Probably. Next was Causes of Death. And today he posted How You Will Die.