Archive for the 'Data & Methods' Category

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U.S. Department of Education Releases College Scorecard Data

The U.S. Department of Education released the data it used for the College Scorecard, along with data on completion rates, financial aid, debt and earnings.

Via Flowing Data: “And it doesn’t look and work like an outdated government site. With all of my frustrations with government sites, the education release feels pretty great. It’s as if the department actually wants us to look at the data. Imagine that.”

Big changes coming to IRBs . . . . still time to comment

OHRP has release its notice of proposed rule making that makes significant changes to the Common Rule.

Federal Register: Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects

[Comment Link]
Comments are accepted up until 12/07/2015 at 11:59 PM EST

If you need to get up to speed, The National Academy of Sciences published a book in 2014 on the first release of changes to the common rule. It is available on-line, as a pdf or as a book.

Will this be an election issue in the US?

The Canadian election campaign period is much shorter than the US. The Canadian election will take place on October 19, 2015 and the campaigning started on August 2nd of this year.

Another difference with the US is the types of issues that candidates are discussing – specifically science policy and the long-form census. Will these be issues in the US? Doubtful, but let’s watch the debates and see.

Below is recent coverage in the Canadian press about the long-form census and science policy being issues, at least among the NDP and Liberals:

Reviving the Census Debate
Donovan Vincent | The Star
September 12, 2015
The Liberals and the NDP have said they want to bring back the long-form census the Conservatives killed in 2010. Could it become an election issue?

Researchers try to make science a federal election issue
Julie Ireton | CBC News
September 3, 2015

Here is a running list of organizations that were against/in favor of the Harper government’s cancellation of the mandatory long-form census.

Here is previous coverage in this blog about Canada’s war on science and follies with their census.

U.S. and World Population Clock Has Been Updated with New Features

The Census Bureau has updated their U.S. and World Population Clock with new visualizations and data:

From the Director’s Blog:

Today, I’m excited to showcase the addition of several new features to the World Population Clock. For the first time, basic population facts and visualizations are available for 228 countries and areas around the world, just as they are for U.S. states.

In addition, World Population Clock users can now get Census Bureau data on international trade in goods by country. It’s amazing to see the range and value of goods that states export to countries around the world – and it’s easy to download, share and embed the data in social media.

2013 Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance data

The Census Bureau has release a new selection of data products on income, poverty, and health insurance coverage. These reflect the redesigned income questions included in a portion of the 2014 survey sample for the 2013 estimates. The new products include:

H/T: Data Detectives

Changes to NBER Working Paper E-Mails

Neil Irwin of NYTimes Upshot writes about why the the National Bureau of Economic Research decided to change the way working papers are presented in its weekly e-mail.

No editorial judgment goes into the sequence in which the working papers appear. It is random, based on the order in which the paper was submitted and in which the N.B.E.R. approval process was completed. In other words, there is no inherent reason to think that the first paper listed is more groundbreaking, important or interesting than the third or 17th.

But a lot more people read the first one listed. Showing up first in the email generated a 33 percent increase in the number of people who clicked on the working paper and a 29 percent increase in the number who downloaded it.

Police calls and blurry neighborhood boundaries

Here’s a great piece using a mix of administrative data (complaint calls to the police), on-line forums, spatial data, and traditional census data to see what happens in the transition zones across neighborhoods. The first link is to the easy-to-read version as reported in CityLab; the second is the original piece, with more details about the methodology.

When Racial Boundaries Are Blurry, Neighbors Take Complaints Straight to 311
Laura Bliss | CityLab
August 25, 2015
In NYC, calls about noise and blocked driveways are most frequent in zones between racially homogenous neighborhoods.

Contested Boundaries: Explaining Where Ethno-Racial Diversity Provokes Neighborhood Conflict
Joscha Legewie and Merlin Schaeffer | Presentated at the American Sociological Meetings
August 21, 2015

Many Psychology Findings Not as Strong as Claimed

The New York Times reports a study published in the latest issue of Science. “A painstaking yearslong effort to reproduce 100 studies published in three leading psychology journals has found that more than half of the findings did not hold up when retested.”

Many Psychology Findings not as Strong as Claimed.

 

Raster Analysis in R

Etienne Racine has published a Visual Raster Cheat Sheet in RPubs.

H/T Urban Demographics.

Rules for Charts

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data discusses the handful of rules for charts and data visualization which should never be broken. These include baselines, pie slices, and encodings.