Archive for the 'Population Dynamics – Urbanization, Migration' Category

Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and Today’s Suburbs

Max Ehrenfreund of Wonkblog uses rumors of a revival of the Will Smith show “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” to discuss changes in the suburbs since that show first aired in the 1990’s.

It’s a show about what happens when a young black man moves out of the inner city and finds himself surrounded by the kind of culture and neighborhood traditionally associated with white America.

If Smith wants to bring the show up to date, he’ll have plenty of material. In the 25 years since “The Fresh Prince” first aired, hundreds of thousands of families of color have moved out of the city and into the suburbs over the past two decades, especially in the Sun Belt.

Commuting Americans

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines commuting data from the 2013 American Community Survey and reports that about 86% of Americans arrive to work in a car and 76% ride in that car alone.

America is still a country of lonely commuters. About 86 percent of us generally get to work in an automobile, according to new Census data from the 2013 American Community Survey released this week. And nearly as many — 76 percent — ride in that car all alone, accompanied only by the radio or the sound of mechanically muffled silence.

See also: Where Americans go to work when they don’t work near home and Where ‘speeding’ is legal.

The Future of the World’s Population

Tariq Khokhar of World Bank uses the United Nation’s updated population figures and projections to create 4 charts which illustrate the future of the world’s population.

But before I dive in, how accurate are these projections? What kind of track record do UN demographers have? The most comprehensive answer I could find was Nico Keilman’s 2001 paper which Hans Rosling refers to in this video. He notes that in 1958, when the UN projected the population in 2000 to be ~6 Billion (it was then 42 years into the future) they ended up being out by less than 5%. The short answer is: these projections are pretty good.

Mixed Race Identity Rises in the South

William Frey, writing for the Brookings Institute, examines the increase in persons identifying as “White and Black” in the southern states.

Yet, the South is attracting blacks in large numbers, including multiracial blacks, from all parts of the country. Thus, it is significant that when states are ranked by the growth rates in their “white and black” multiracial populations in the first decade of the 2000s, it is these Southern states that lead all others.

Millennial Generation Still Living at Home

Despite an improved economy more young adults live with their parents: “In 2010, 69% of 18- to 34-year-olds lived independently. As of the first four months of this year, only 67% of Millennials were living independently.”

Pew Report here.

White Gains/Losses in Cities and Suburbs

William H. Frey notes in a piece for Brookings that:

More than one-quarter of the 100 largest metropolitan areas experienced white losses in both cities and suburbs. Less than half (45) of the these areas followed the traditional patterns of white city loss and suburban gain—including Midwest areas such as Columbus, Kansas City, and Minneapolis-St. Paul.

The Influence of Economic Segregation

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines the policy effects of economic segregation, particularly the skewed view the wealthy have of poverty:

The wealthy, surrounded by other wealthy people, generally believed the U.S. population was wealthier than it actually is. It’s easy to imagine why they might make this mistake: If you look around you and see few poor people — on the street, in your child’s classroom, at the grocery store — you may think poverty is pretty rare.

See also: Dawtry, Sutton & Sibley, Why Wealthier People Think People Are Wealthier, and Why It Matters

Mapping the Oldest and Youngest States in the U.S.

Ana Swanson of Wonkblog examines a series of animated maps created by Jishai Evers of Dadaviz showing the states and counties where different generations (“Greatest Generation” to “Generation Z”).

A few generations ago, most people lived out their lives in the places where they were born. Today, Americans are used to moving, often due to the pull of economic opportunity. Teenagers move across the country to go to college, 20- and 30-somethings flock to cities for jobs, and white-haired “snow birds” head to Florida or Arizona to escape the winter.

Housing Preference and Segregation

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines how race influences where we choose to live.

Every day renters walk into the Oak Park Regional Housing Center certain they don’t want to live on the east side of town. The east side of town, in this small suburb that borders Chicago, is geographic code for uncomfortably close to where the poor blacks live.

See also the Wonkblog piece on the Obama administration’s new rules targeting segregation.

Illegal Immigration From Mexico

The Pew Research Center listed several facts based on their analysis about illegal immigration from Mexico, such as the number of Mexican immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, who is apprehended at the border, deportations, and where unauthorized immigrants live and work.