Archive for the 'Population Dynamics – Urbanization, Migration' Category

Pew Research Center on Immigration

The Pew Research Center has published many articles over the last few weeks on immigration, drawing from their new report, Modern Immigration Wave Brings 59 Million to U.S., Driving Population Growth and Change Through 2065:

U.S. Population Migration Data

The Internal Revenue Service released migration data based on year-to-year address changes based on income tax returns filed with the IRS.

They present migration patterns by State or by county for the entire United States and are available for inflows—the number of new residents who moved to a State or county and where they migrated from, and outflows—the number of residents leaving a State or county and where they went.

H/T Data Detectives

Number of Forcibly Displaced Persons Reaches 60 Million

The World Bank Open Data blog examines recent data from the United Nations Refugee Agency about the 60 million people currently forcibly displaced from their homes.

As we continue to see headlines and editorials almost every day about migrants and refugees, it’s not surprising when UNHCR reports that the number of forcibly displaced people has reached 60 million worldwide for the first time since World War II. This figure includes internally displaced people, refugees, and asylum seekers.

While many are on the move as refugees, others migrate willfully at rates that have also reached unprecedented levels. Below, I’ve explored some trends in regional, country- and economic-level migration and refugee data.

Police calls and blurry neighborhood boundaries

Here’s a great piece using a mix of administrative data (complaint calls to the police), on-line forums, spatial data, and traditional census data to see what happens in the transition zones across neighborhoods. The first link is to the easy-to-read version as reported in CityLab; the second is the original piece, with more details about the methodology.

When Racial Boundaries Are Blurry, Neighbors Take Complaints Straight to 311
Laura Bliss | CityLab
August 25, 2015
In NYC, calls about noise and blocked driveways are most frequent in zones between racially homogenous neighborhoods.

Contested Boundaries: Explaining Where Ethno-Racial Diversity Provokes Neighborhood Conflict
Joscha Legewie and Merlin Schaeffer | Presentated at the American Sociological Meetings
August 21, 2015

10 Years After Katrina

Here is a round-up of some of the reporting on New Orleans 10 years after Katrina:

From FiveThirtyEight:

The Pew Research Center: Remembering Katrina: Wide Racial Divide over Government’s Response

Wonkblog: What happened when Brad Pitt and his architects came to rebuild New Orleans

Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and Today’s Suburbs

Max Ehrenfreund of Wonkblog uses rumors of a revival of the Will Smith show “Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” to discuss changes in the suburbs since that show first aired in the 1990’s.

It’s a show about what happens when a young black man moves out of the inner city and finds himself surrounded by the kind of culture and neighborhood traditionally associated with white America.

If Smith wants to bring the show up to date, he’ll have plenty of material. In the 25 years since “The Fresh Prince” first aired, hundreds of thousands of families of color have moved out of the city and into the suburbs over the past two decades, especially in the Sun Belt.

Commuting Americans

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines commuting data from the 2013 American Community Survey and reports that about 86% of Americans arrive to work in a car and 76% ride in that car alone.

America is still a country of lonely commuters. About 86 percent of us generally get to work in an automobile, according to new Census data from the 2013 American Community Survey released this week. And nearly as many — 76 percent — ride in that car all alone, accompanied only by the radio or the sound of mechanically muffled silence.

See also: Where Americans go to work when they don’t work near home and Where ‘speeding’ is legal.

The Future of the World’s Population

Tariq Khokhar of World Bank uses the United Nation’s updated population figures and projections to create 4 charts which illustrate the future of the world’s population.

But before I dive in, how accurate are these projections? What kind of track record do UN demographers have? The most comprehensive answer I could find was Nico Keilman’s 2001 paper which Hans Rosling refers to in this video. He notes that in 1958, when the UN projected the population in 2000 to be ~6 Billion (it was then 42 years into the future) they ended up being out by less than 5%. The short answer is: these projections are pretty good.

Mixed Race Identity Rises in the South

William Frey, writing for the Brookings Institute, examines the increase in persons identifying as “White and Black” in the southern states.

Yet, the South is attracting blacks in large numbers, including multiracial blacks, from all parts of the country. Thus, it is significant that when states are ranked by the growth rates in their “white and black” multiracial populations in the first decade of the 2000s, it is these Southern states that lead all others.

Millennial Generation Still Living at Home

Despite an improved economy more young adults live with their parents: “In 2010, 69% of 18- to 34-year-olds lived independently. As of the first four months of this year, only 67% of Millennials were living independently.”

Pew Report here.