Archive for the 'Population Dynamics - Urbanization, Migration' Category

Decomposition of Future Population Growth

From the UNFPA website:

The main objective of the decomposition tool is to provide evidence and analysis that countries can use to develop policies and programmes aimed to find a balance between demographic change and social, economic and environmental goals.

This program calculates the contributions of different demographic factors (wanted and un-wanted fertility, mortality, migration, and age structure) to population growth. It is based on the medium variant population projection of the United Nations from 2010 to 2050 for all countries and main regions.

Select a country or region from the window below to view the results of the decomposition tool. Move mouse over the figures to explore the interactive data content. Then read and download a report summarizing the results, methods, and policy implications.

Learn more and use the tool on the website.

Blexting: it’s not what you think

Blexting is short for “blight texting.” It is an app that a Detroit-based start-up (Loveland Technologies) created, which is being used to map all Detroit structures to fight blight. Here’s a bit of the coverage of the software and the amazing progress the blexters have made in mapping Detroit blight:

map

Watch: Battling Blight with “Blexting”
Hell Yeah Detroit | Your Online Guide to Being a Better Detroiter
January 26, 2014

Loveland’s passion: Battle blight
Amy Haimerl | Crain’s Detroit
February 19, 2014
Map tech – aka ‘blexting’ – charts growth

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings
Quinn Klinefelter | National Public Radio
February 18, 2014

A Picture of Detroit Ruin, Street by Forlorn Street
Monica Davey | New York Times
February 17, 2014

Minimum Wage and Migration

By: Kirk Johnson
Source: New York Times

In the nation’s debate about the minimum wage, which President Obama has proposed increasing at the federal level to $10.10 from $7.25, this rolling borderland of onion farms and strip malls provides a test tube of sorts for observing how the minimum wage works in daily life, and how differences in the rate can affect a local economy in sometimes unexpected ways.

Read the full story at the New York Times

County-to-County Migration Flows

The Census Bureau has released county to county migration flow data from the 2007-2011 ACS. This allows researchers to look at outbound, inbound, and net migration flows by selected characteristics (education, household income, and individual income).

Perhaps, Governor Snyder had advance access to these data before his state-of-the-state address as the only positive net value for Wayne County (and Michigan) is “movers from abroad.” Wayne County has a net loss of 28,000 to other Michigan counties and a net loss of approximately 17,000 to out of state counties. It has about one-third of Michigan’s movers from abroad (7,620 out of 24,715).

Check out this spreadsheet for Michigan counties – click on image:

spreadsheet

[Click here for Michigan Data Table]

Data, Guides, and Flows Mapper Interface
2007-2011 County-to-County Migration Flows
Megan Benetsky | US Census Bureau
Very useful working paper, which shows the sorts of analyses possible with the data.

County-to-County Migration Flows Tables

Census Flows Mapper

Additional Press
Many New Educated Entrants to Big U.S. Cities Came from Overseas
Neil Shah | Wall Street Journal
February 6, 2014
This article quotes Bill Frey who notes that many of the higher educated migrants to big cities are foreign born.

A Detailed Map of the Net Migration Flows for Every U.S. County
Emily Badger | Atlantic Cities
February 11, 2014

Notable Publications from the Bureau of Justice Statistics

Below are selected recent publications from the Bureau of Justice Statistics:

Correctional Populations in the United States: 2012
Federal Justice Statistics, 2010
Felony Defendants in Large Urban Counties: 2009 – Statistical Tables
Prisoners in 2012: Trends in Admissions and Releases, 1991-2012
Probation and Parole in the United States: 2012

And, here are links to data & reports from the Bureau of Justice Statistics:
Data | Reports | Analysis Tools | New Releases

Project Tycho: Historical Disease Data

Project Tycho is funded by NIH and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. It has taken historical data from the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) and created count data for diseases by location for the 125 year history of the surveillance system. Three levels of data have been made available to users from the Project Tycho website.

Other useful resources:

  • Materials and Methods: Digitication of US Weekly Surveillance Reports between 1888 and 2011
  • Preliminary State Reports (scroll down for access – here’s an example for Michigan)
  • What does Tycho stand for?
  • And, here is a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine based on these data. It estimates that over 100 million cases of contagious diseases have been prevented in the U.S. since 1924 by vaccination programs against polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis A, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough).

    Contagious Diseases in the United States from 1888 to the Present
    New England Journal of Medicine
    November 28, 2013
    html | pdf

    Elderly Immigrants in the United States

    From the publication website:

    In 2010, more than one in eight U.S. adults ages 65 and older were foreign-born, a share that is expected to continue to grow. The U.S. elderly immigrant population rose from 2.7 million in 1990 to 4.6 million in 2010, a 70 percent increase in 20 years (see figure). This issue of Today’s Research on Aging reviews recent research examining older immigrants in the United States, conducted by National Institute on Aging (NIA)-supported researchers and others. Understanding both the unique characteristics of elderly foreign-born adults and the challenges some of them face is important as policymakers and planners address the well-being and health of the United States’ aging population.

    The U.S. Foreign-Born Population Ages 65+ Increased Substantially Between 1990 and 2010.

    graph depicting U.S. foreign born population
    Source: U.S. Census Bureau, historical census data 1950-2000; and Current Population Survey, 2010.

    Download the full report (PDF)

    Demolition as an Urban Strategy

    Via The New York Times
    by: Timothy Williams

    Large-scale destruction is well known in Detroit, but it is also underway in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Buffalo and others at a total cost of more than $250 million. Officials are tearing down tens of thousands of vacant buildings, many habitable, as they seek to stimulate economic growth, reduce crime and blight, and increase environmental sustainability.

    Full NYT story
    Brookings Report (2012)
    Berkeley Report (published in 2012 in the Yale Law Journal)

    Visualizing Births and Deaths in Real-Time

    Data visualizations are becoming more and more popular and sometimes they include demographic concepts. The following are two simulations of births and deaths – one for the US and the other for the world.

    Click on the images to start the simulations. To read more about how these were made see references below:

    us_map world_map

    Watch This Anxiety-Provoking Simulation of U.S. Births and Deaths
    John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities
    December 11, 2012

    This Map Shows Where in the World People Are Dying and Being Born
    John Metcalfe | The Atlantic Cities
    October 14, 2013

    World Births/Deaths Simulation – Adding World Cities
    Brad Lyon | Nowhere Near Ithaca Blog
    October 9, 2013

    Counting Prisoners

    The New York Times had another editorial on this issue:
    Prison-Based Gerrymandering
    Editorial Board | New York Times
    September 26, 2013

    A search on its site shows that this has been a common editorial/story topic
    [Counting Prisoners Editorials/Stories]

    The PSC Infoblog has had a previous post on this topic as well, which included the Census Bureau’s response to the issue. The Census Bureau released group quarters data in time for redistricting.

    Another excellent source on this topic is the National Academy of Sciences book, which is available in the PSC library:
    Once, Only Once and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census
    Daniel Cork and Paul Voss, Editors | The National Academies
    2006