Archive for the 'Population Dynamics – Urbanization, Migration' Category

The Influence of Economic Segregation

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines the policy effects of economic segregation, particularly the skewed view the wealthy have of poverty:

The wealthy, surrounded by other wealthy people, generally believed the U.S. population was wealthier than it actually is. It’s easy to imagine why they might make this mistake: If you look around you and see few poor people — on the street, in your child’s classroom, at the grocery store — you may think poverty is pretty rare.

See also: Dawtry, Sutton & Sibley, Why Wealthier People Think People Are Wealthier, and Why It Matters

Mapping the Oldest and Youngest States in the U.S.

Ana Swanson of Wonkblog examines a series of animated maps created by Jishai Evers of Dadaviz showing the states and counties where different generations (“Greatest Generation” to “Generation Z”).

A few generations ago, most people lived out their lives in the places where they were born. Today, Americans are used to moving, often due to the pull of economic opportunity. Teenagers move across the country to go to college, 20- and 30-somethings flock to cities for jobs, and white-haired “snow birds” head to Florida or Arizona to escape the winter.

Housing Preference and Segregation

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines how race influences where we choose to live.

Every day renters walk into the Oak Park Regional Housing Center certain they don’t want to live on the east side of town. The east side of town, in this small suburb that borders Chicago, is geographic code for uncomfortably close to where the poor blacks live.

See also the Wonkblog piece on the Obama administration’s new rules targeting segregation.

Illegal Immigration From Mexico

The Pew Research Center listed several facts based on their analysis about illegal immigration from Mexico, such as the number of Mexican immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, who is apprehended at the border, deportations, and where unauthorized immigrants live and work.

Newest New Yorkers

The New York City Planning Department released the latest in its Newest New Yorker series. The 2013 edition, The Newest New Yorkers: Characteristics of the City’s Foreign-born Population, builds on the earlier edition, and provides detailed analyses of the newest data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey. There is also an interactive map showing the immigrant make-up of each of New York’s neighborhoods.

H/T Data Detectives

U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base

The U.S. Census Bureau released revised estimates and projections for 24 countries, including China, Iraq, Malawi, South Africa and United States. See the release note tab for a full list of revised countries.

Big data and smart cities

Urban Demographics posted a presentation by Rob Kitchin based on his paper “The real-time city? Big data and smart urbanism” (gated version; working paper version).

Abstract:

‘Smart cities’ is a term that has gained traction in academia, business and government to describe cities that, on the one hand, are increasingly composed of and monitored by pervasive and ubiquitous computing and, on the other, whose economy and governance is being driven by innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship, enacted by smart people. This paper focuses on the former and, drawing on a number of examples, details how cities are being instrumented with digital devices and infrastructure that produce ‘big data’. Such data, smart city advocates argue enables real-time analysis of city life, new modes of urban governance, and provides the raw material for envisioning and enacting more efficient, sustainable, competitive, productive, open and transparent cities. The final section of the paper provides a critical reflection on the implications of big data and smart urbanism, examining five emerging concerns: the politics of big urban data, technocratic governance and city development, corporatisation of city governance and technological lock-ins, buggy, brittle and hackable cities, and the panoptic city.

10 U.S. Cities Now Have 1 Million or More People

The U.S. Census Bureau released it’s Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places of 50,000 or More. Read highlights here.

Related:
FiveThirtyEight: How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

Mapping Race in the U.S.

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data created an interactive map showing the concentrations of Whites, Hispanics, Blacks, Asians, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders at the county level.

The map above shows the most prevalent race in each county, based on data from the 2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Select and deselect to make various comparisons. Or, select just one race to see distribution. Low, medium, and high saturation indicates whether the prevalent race percentage is below or about the same, higher (greater than the national average plus-minus interval), or much higher than the national average (at least 50% higher), respectively.

Transportation Alternatives by Census Region

The U.S. Census American Housing Survey began gathering data on household public transportation use. A new infographic summarizes the results. Click on the image for a larger view.


Transportation Alternatives by Census Region

[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]