Archive for the 'Population Dynamics – Urbanization, Migration' Category

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Backcasting Native Hawaiian Population

The Pew Research Center Fact Tank examines findings by David Swanson which uses 1910 and 1920 Census data to estimate the population of Hawaii in 1778, the year Capt. James Cook arrived.

In this case, Swanson took a detailed look at the 1910 and 1920 U.S. Census’s Native Hawaiian counts, tracking the survival rate of each five-year age group from one census to the next. For example, he looked at how many children who were newborns to age 4 in 1910 were counted as 10- to 14-year-olds in 1920, then did the same for each successive age group. For each group, he created a “reverse cohort change ratio,” which he used to go back in time and estimate the size of each age group for each decade until he got to 1770.

The article also reports on the growth of the Native Hawaiian population since the 1980s.

Wal-Mart’s Urban Spread

In 2010, 0% of the residents of Washington, DC lived within 2 miles of a Wal-Mart. 5 years later, 41% of residents do. NPR compiled data on the locations of Wal-Marts in Washington, DC, Chicago, and Atlanta and explores what this expansion means for urban neighborhoods. Today’s story focuses on what it means for the workers

PRB Webinar: Mapping Research Approaches to the Demographic Dividend

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 23, 2015, from 10:00 AM–11:00 AM (EDT) (GMT-4)

From the e-mail:

The demographic dividend offers a powerful argument linking population dynamics and economic development. This topic has attracted a wide variety of researchers and international development organizations and has recently gained traction among global policy audiences. However, research approaches to the demographic dividend are varied and a greater integration of the methodological approaches may be warranted.

More information and register

Urban Living

This week, Wonkblog had several articles about different aspects of city living:

The cities where salaries are keeping up with housing prices – and where they are not

Median wages grew 1.3 percent between the second quarter of 2012 and the second quarter of 2014. However, home prices grew by a stunning 17 percent, according to RealtyTrac, which used data on average weekly wages from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and median home prices from sales deeds in 184 metropolitan areas.

When cheap housing isn’t really a good deal

The golden rule of housing affordability — embraced by government agencies, mortgage lenders, private landlords and the financially savvy — says you that should not spend more than around 30 percent of your income on your housing costs.

This number, though, is a little deceptive — or, at least, it’s incomplete. That’s because decisions that you make about where to live influence what you pay for life’s second-biggest expense: transportation.

New Census data: Americans are returning to the far-flung suburbs

During the housing bubble, Americans moved in droves to the exurbs, to newly paved subdivisions on what was once rural land. Far-out suburbs had some of the fastest population growth in the country in the early 2000s, fueled by cheap housing and easy mortgages. And these places helped redefine how we think about metropolitan areas like Washington, pushing their edges farther and farther from the traditional downtown.

In the wake of the housing crash, these same places took the biggest hit. Population growth in the exurbs stalled. They produced a new American phenomenon: the ghost subdivision of developments abandoned during the housing collapse before anyone got around to finishing the roads or sidewalks.

How the whitest city in America appears through the eyes of its black residents

(Portland, OR) is about 76 percent white, making it the whitest big city in the U.S. And diversity has been dwindling in the neighborhoods close to the center of town, as minorities have increasingly moved out to the city’s edges.

Welcome to the world of the $6 bus ride to work, $7 juice not included

The new venture-backed private transportation service Leap began offering rides in San Francisco last week in a swanky shuttle meant to feel “more like a living room than a bus.” A ride with the service, which costs $6 one-way or $5 in bulk, comes with WiFi, USB ports, a laptop bar and locally made pressed juices (for sale on board, that is).

Desire to Move and Residential Mobility

The U.S. Census Bureau released a report examining householders’ desire to move in 2010 and their subsequent mobility patterns in 2010-2011.

The residences we live in are associated with economic opportunities, health status, social relationships, and exposure to crime and disorder. This report focuses on people who desire to move to a new residence because of dissatisfaction with where they live, and it examines how frequently people who desire to move to a new residence do so. “Residences” here include housing units, neighborhoods, and local communities.

H/T Data Detectives

Comparing Generations

The Pew Research Center published an interactive chart comparing different generations’s experiences in 2014 and “when they were young (18-33)”.

No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the No Ceilings initiative of the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation published an interactive website marking the 20th anniversary of the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing.

In 1995, at the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, leaders from governments and civil society around the world came together and committed to ensuring that women and girls have the opportunity to participate fully in all aspects of life.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of that moment. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the No Ceilings initiative of the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation have joined forces to gather data and analyze the gains made for women and girls over the last two decades, as well as the gaps that remain.

This site and The Full Participation Report are the result—home to 850,000 data points, spanning more than 20 years, from over 190 countries. Through data visualizations and stories, we aim to present the gains and gaps in understandable, sharable ways—including by making the data open and easily available.

The full report and data are also available.

Foreign-Born Share of U.S. Population Expected to Reach Historic High by 2060

The Pew Research Center FactTank examines the new Census Bureau population projections and finds “the nation’s foreign-born population is projected to reach 78 million by 2060, making up 18.8% of the total U.S. population…with the bureau projecting that the previous record high of 14.8% in 1890 will be passed as soon as 2025.”

Pew Research Center article
2014 National Population Projections: Summary Tables

Urban Models and Urban Center

Peter Gordon examines the way central business districts and sub-centers are defined by economists:

Following Milton Friedman’s suggestion that economic models be judged not by the plausibility of their assumptions, but by their ability to predict, Queen Elizabeth asked some of LSE’s finest why they did not see the Great Recession coming. Ouch!

U.S. Population Projections

A new U.S. Census Bureau Report analyzing U.S. population projections: Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014-2060.

From the introduction:

Between 2014 and 2060, the U.S. population is projected to increase from 319 million to 417 million, reaching 400 million in 2051. The U.S. population is projected to grow more slowly in future decades than in the recent past, as these projections assume that fertility rates will continue to decline and that there will be a modest decline in the overall rate of net international migration. By 2030, one in five Americans is projected to be 65 and over; by 2044, more than half of all Americans are projected to belong to a minority group (any group other than non-Hispanic White alone); and by 2060, nearly one in five of the nation’s total population is projected to be foreign born.

H/T: Data Detectives