Archive for the 'Population Dynamics' Category

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Pre-WWII Segregation In U.S. Cities

Emily Badger of Wonkblog, examines a paper by Allison Shertzer and Randall P. Walsh about how the arrival of blacks in 10 northern cities between 1900 and 1930 caused whites to sort themselves into different neighborhoods.

In their new research, they studied how the arrival of blacks in 10 northern cities at the time influenced white behavior. Over the course of the first three decades after the turn of the century, coinciding with the start of the Great Migration of blacks out of the South, this pattern accelerated: As blacks arrived in northern neighborhoods, more whites left. By the 1920s, there were more than three white departures for every black arrival.

Mixed Marriage and How We Think About Race

Jeff Guo of Wonkblog examines research showing trends in how children of mixed marriages report their own race to the Census Report.

In fact, new immigrants may be assimilating a lot faster than than we had ever thought. A new study this week from economists Brian Duncan, of the University of Colorado, and Stephen Trejo of University of Texas, Austin finds that the descendents of immigrants from Latin-American and Asian countries quickly cease to identify as Hispanic or Asian on government surveys.

The Duncan & Trejo paper can be found here.

Historical Immigration to the U.S.

The University of Richmond Digital Scholarship Lab created an interactive map showing the foreign born population and countries of origin at the county level since 1850.

H/T Urban Demographics

Marriage and Gender Equality

Philip Cohen of Family Inequality charts the correlation between marriage and gender inequality:

I used data from this U.N. report on marriage rates from 2008, restricted to those countries that had data from 2000 or later. To show marriage rates I used the percentage of women ages 30-34 that are currently married. This is thus a combination of marriage prevalence and marriage timing, which is something like the amount of marriage in the country. I got gender inequality from the U.N. Development Programme’s Human Development Report for 2015. The gender inequality index combines the maternal mortality ratio, the adolescent birth rate, the representation of women in the national parliament, the gender gap in secondary education, and the gender gap in labor market participation.

World Bank Gender Data Portal

The World Bank has launched a gender data portal:

Gender data are one of the most visited parts of our data site, and these new resources make it easier than ever to see our data’s gender dimensions. The country and topic dashboards give an overview of the distribution and trends in data across important themes, and the online tables and book are a useful reference for the most commonly accessed data.

Open Data, the World Bank blog, pulled four charts from the portal to illustrate gaps which still need to be closed.

Intelligence, Racial Attitudes and Policies

Max Ehrenfreund of Wonkblog writes about a new study by former PSC trainee Geoffrey Wodke showing that more intelligent people are no more interested in supporting policies designed to improve racial equality (such as Affirmative Action or school busing):

When you get down to the brass tacks of dealing with racial prejudice, though, more intelligent people seem to tunnel back into the woodwork. The new study revealed that smarter respondents are no more likely to support specific policies designed to improve racial equality — even though they are more liberal on other issues and are more likely to see discrimination as a problem.

Inequality and Political Turmoil

Jay Ulfelder, writing for FiveThirtyEight, argues that the widely held belief that economic inequality causes political upheaval is a difficult thing to prove:

Just because a belief is widely held, however, does not make it true. In fact, it’s still hard to establish with confidence whether and how economic inequality shapes political turmoil around the world. That’s largely because of the difficulty in measuring inequality; on this subject, the historical record is full of holes. Social scientists are busy building better data sets, but the ones we have now aren’t sufficient to make strong causal claims at the global level.

Philip Cohen’s response to the piece is on his blog, Family Inequality.

Mortality of Middle Aged White Men

Philip Cohen, writing for the Family Inequality blog, has some concerns about the Case and Deaton paper showing that the mortality rate for middle-aged white men is rising: “My concern is that changes in the age and sex composition of the population studied could account for a non-trivial amount of the trends they report.”

Measuring Race and Ethnicity Across the Decades: 1790-2010

The U.S. Census Bureau released a new interactive visualization which shows how race and ethnicity categories have changed since the first census.

From the Random Samplings blog post:

Over the years, the U.S. Census Bureau has collected information on race and ethnicity. The census form has always reflected changes in society, and shifts have occurred in the way the Census Bureau classifies race and ethnicity. Historically, the changes have been influenced by social, political and economic factors including emancipation, immigration and civil rights. Today, the Census Bureau collects race and ethnic data according to U.S. Office of Management and Budget guidelines, and these data are based on self-identification.

H/T: Data Detectives

Pew Research Report on Religion in the U.S.

The Pew Research Center released it’s new report “U.S. Public Becoming Less Religious“.