Archive for the 'Population Dynamics – Urbanization, Migration' Category

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Population Trends in U.S. Cities

A new U.S. Census Current Population Report (PDF) examines the ways populations in U.S. cities changed between 2010 and 2013.

From the introduction:

Nearly two-thirds of Americans live in incorporated places, commonly referred to as cities. As the majority of the nation’s population lives in cities, patterns of population change among cities and the social and economic conditions affecting them often represent national trends. Using data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses and 2013 population estimates, this report examines the population in cities and highlights how city populations changed between 2000 and 2010, and between 2010 and 2013. The report discusses the distribution of the population in cities by region, state, and city population size. It also highlights the fastest growing cities, city population densities, annexation, and new incorporations between 2010 and 2013.

The New York State Data Center Affiliates wrote this report up in a March 4 post for their Data Detectives blog.

Another take on gentrification

Gentrification in America Report
Mike Maciag | Governing
February 2015
This resource is city-specific and provides both counts and maps of gentrified census tracts for the 50 largest cities. To be eligible for gentrification a census tract’s median household income and median home value were both in the bottom 40th percentile of all tracts within a metro area at the beginning of the decade. The gentrified tracts recorded increases in the top third percentile for both measures when compared to all others in a metro area.

Methodology

And more broadly, this resource has a special issue on gentrification:

The G-Word: A Special Series on Gentrification
The titles in this series are:
Do Cities Need Kids?
The Neighborhood Has Gentrified, But Where’s the Grocery Store?
Just Green Enough
Gentrification’s Not So Black and White After All
The Downsides of a Neighborhood ‘Turnaround
Some Cities Are Spurring the End of Sprawl
Keeping Cities from Becoming “Child-Free Zones”
From Vacant to Vibrant: Cincinnati’s Urban Transformation
Can Cities Change the Face of Biking?

Segregation in 20th Century America

Emily Badger of Wonkblog discusses a new study by Trevon Logan and John Parman which examines the rise of segregation in the United States from 1880 to 1940 using the Census records gathered by counters walking door-to-door, “They show patterns of fine-grained racial segregation that are impossible to see in public Census data today where privacy concerns override precision.”

Read the full Wonkblog article.
Logan and Parman’s paper, “The National Rise in Residential Segregation”.

Comparing 4 World Cities

Ricky Burdett of LSE Cities compares the economic, political and environmental shifts in London, Delhi, Tokyo, and Bogota in an article for the Guardian.

Hispanic Segregation

Ana Swanson at WonkBlog discusses a map by William H. Frey showing the areas of the countries where Hispanics are segregated.

Millennials are projected to outnumber Baby Boomers

Richard Fry of Pew Research Center examines new released Census Bureau population projections. The generation born between 1981 and 1997 continues to grow while the Baby Boom generation (born between 1946 and 1964) is shrinking and they are expected to outnumber the Boomers this year. The comments on the article provide an interesting discussion of the boundaries of generations.

Read the full analysis.

City Limits and City Growth

Kirk Goldsberry from the FiveThirtyEight blog responses to an op-ed in the Washington Post about the changing demographics of U.S. cities.

The Washington Post argues that the growth of cities results in a loss of African-Americans. FiveThirtyEight argues that spatial growth and demographic growth are different and the way city limits are defined complicates the definition of a city’s population.

Read the Washington Post op-ed here. And the FiveThirtyEight piece here.

Mapping Social Security Benefits

Wonkblog highlights four maps created by Seth Kadish of Vizual Statistix.

The maps show … the percentage of a county’s population that receives OASDI benefits; the percentage of OASDI beneficiaries who are retired, rather than disabled; the areas where payments to men most greatly outweigh those given to women; and the average monthly OASDI payment, in hundreds of dollars.

Not any more: NY vs FL

cartoon

The above cartoon is from the Florida Sun Sentinal back in early 2014 as New York just held on to its ranking as the third largest state. With the release of the most recent population estimates, Florida has now edged out New York.

Florida Passes New York to Become the Nation’s Third Most Populous State, Census Bureau Reports
December 23, 2014

We’ve updated our Apportionment Calculator. See which states are projected to lose/gain seats in 2020 based on the 2014 results.

And, no. North Dakota is not gaining a seat, even as it is the fastest growing state.

Persistence of Neighborhood Poverty

By: Emily Badger
Via: Washington Post Wonkblog

Despite their ubiquity in the media, gentrifying neighborhoods that evolve over time from low-income to well-off are quite rare. It is far, far more common that once-poor neighborhoods stay that way over time — or, worse, that they grow poorer.

The article is based on the report “Lost in Place” (PDF) by Joe Cortright and Dillon Mahmoudi for City Observatory

See also Marketplace’s series, York & Fig, on neighborhood gentrification.