Archive for the 'Population Dynamics' Category

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Mapping the Oldest and Youngest States in the U.S.

Ana Swanson of Wonkblog examines a series of animated maps created by Jishai Evers of Dadaviz showing the states and counties where different generations (“Greatest Generation” to “Generation Z”).

A few generations ago, most people lived out their lives in the places where they were born. Today, Americans are used to moving, often due to the pull of economic opportunity. Teenagers move across the country to go to college, 20- and 30-somethings flock to cities for jobs, and white-haired “snow birds” head to Florida or Arizona to escape the winter.

Illegal Immigration From Mexico

The Pew Research Center listed several facts based on their analysis about illegal immigration from Mexico, such as the number of Mexican immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, who is apprehended at the border, deportations, and where unauthorized immigrants live and work.

Newest New Yorkers

The New York City Planning Department released the latest in its Newest New Yorker series. The 2013 edition, The Newest New Yorkers: Characteristics of the City’s Foreign-born Population, builds on the earlier edition, and provides detailed analyses of the newest data from the U.S. Census American Community Survey. There is also an interactive map showing the immigrant make-up of each of New York’s neighborhoods.

H/T Data Detectives

U.S. Census Bureau International Data Base

The U.S. Census Bureau released revised estimates and projections for 24 countries, including China, Iraq, Malawi, South Africa and United States. See the release note tab for a full list of revised countries.

America’s Changing Religious Landscape

The Pew Research Center released a report earlier this month examining religion in the United States. Overall, they find that Christianity is in decline among Americans of all ages, races and ethnicities, and education levels.

Download the complete report (PDF)
Interactive database tool

See also: Q&A: A look at what’s driving the changes seen in our Religious Landscape Study and a study from last year, How Americans Feel About Religious Groups.

10 U.S. Cities Now Have 1 Million or More People

The U.S. Census Bureau released it’s Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places of 50,000 or More. Read highlights here.

FiveThirtyEight: How Suburban Are Big American Cities?

Voter Turnout in OECD Countries

Drew DeSilver of Pew Research Center analyzed voter data for OECD countries and found that the U.S. voter turnout ranks near the bottom among the voting-age population (53.5% in 2012), but much higher among registered voters (84.3%).

Mapping Race in the U.S.

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data created an interactive map showing the concentrations of Whites, Hispanics, Blacks, Asians, Native Americans, and Pacific Islanders at the county level.

The map above shows the most prevalent race in each county, based on data from the 2013 American Community Survey 5-year estimates. Select and deselect to make various comparisons. Or, select just one race to see distribution. Low, medium, and high saturation indicates whether the prevalent race percentage is below or about the same, higher (greater than the national average plus-minus interval), or much higher than the national average (at least 50% higher), respectively.

Transportation Alternatives by Census Region

The U.S. Census American Housing Survey began gathering data on household public transportation use. A new infographic summarizes the results. Click on the image for a larger view.

Transportation Alternatives by Census Region[Source: U.S. Census Bureau]

Moving to Opportunity Update

Both the New York Times Upshot and NPR’s Planet Money have stories this morning about Raj Chetty’s Equality of Opportunity Project (previous posted about here).