Archive for the 'Population Dynamics - Urbanization, Migration' Category

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Net Migration from Mexico Falls to Zero – and Perhaps Less

Mexican Immigration to U.S. Slowed Significantly, Report Says
Julia Preston | New York Times
April 23, 2012
The Pew Hispanic Center [see below for full report] said that not only did immigration come to a near halt after years of growth but also the number of Mexicans leaving rose sharply.

Tide Turns on Border Crossing
Miriam Jordan | Wall Street Journal
April 23, 2012

Net Migration from Mexico Falls to Zero – and Perhaps Less
Jeffrey Passel, D’Vera Cohn and Ana Gonzalez-Barrera | Pew Hispanic Center
April 23, 2012
[Executive Summary] | [Full Report]

The Asian Population: 2010

2010 Census Shows Asians are Fastest-Growing Race Group
By: Elizabeth M. Hoeffel, Sonya Rastogi, Myoung Ouk Kim, and Hasan Shahid
Source: United States Census Bureau

From press release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a 2010 Census brief, The Asian Population: 2010 [PDF], that shows the Asian population grew faster than any other race group over the last decade. The population that identified as Asian, either alone or in combination with one or more other races, grew by 45.6 percent from 2000 to 2010, while those who identified as Asian alone grew by 43.3 percent. Both populations grew at a faster rate than the total U.S. population, which increased by 9.7 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Out of the total U.S. population, 14.7 million people, or 4.8 percent, were Asian alone. In addition, 2.6 million people, or another 0.9 percent, reported Asian in combination with one or more other races. Together, these two groups totaled 17.3 million people. Thus, 5.6 percent of all people in the United States identified as Asian, either alone or in combination with one or more other races.

2010 Census Brief (PDF)

2005-2009 American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Files

Source: United States Census Bureau

From press release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released estimates from the American Community Survey showing how many people migrated from one specific county to another during the course of a year ─ the first such numbers published since these data were collected as part of the 2000 Census.

The American Community Survey compiles data over a five-year period and asks people where they lived one year prior to being surveyed. The first five-year estimates released covers the years from 2005 to 2009.

The 2005-2009 American Community Survey County-to-County Migration Files provide tables for each county in the nation, showing both “inflows” and “outflows.” Inflows are the number of people living in a given county who lived in another specific county one year earlier; outflows represent the number of people who lived in a particular county one year earlier who subsequently moved to another specific county.

Of the 48.1 million people who lived in a different residence in the United States one year earlier, 17.7 million lived in a different county.

Full report by Megan Benetsky and Kin Koerber (PDF)

County-to-County Migration Flow tables and data

The American Indian and Alaska Native Population: 2010

By: Tina Norris, Paula L. Vines, and Elizabeth M. Hoeffel
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Graph
From press release:

The U.S. Census Bureau today released a 2010 Census brief, The American Indian and Alaska Native Population: 2010, [PDF] that shows almost half (44 percent) of this population, or 2.3 million people, reported being American Indian and Alaska Native in combination with one or more other races. This multiracial group grew by 39 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Overall, 5.2 million people, or 1.7 percent of all people in the United States, identified as American Indian and Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with one or more races. This population grew by 27 percent from 2000 to 2010. Those who reported being American Indian and Alaska Native alone totaled 2.9 million, an increase of 18 percent from 2000 to 2010. The multiple race American Indian and Alaska Native population, as well as both the alone and alone-or-in-combination populations, all grew at a faster rate than the total U.S. population, which increased by 9.7 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Census Brief (PDF)

Transatlantic Trends: Immigration 2011

A comparison of North American and European public opinion on immigration
Source: Transatlantic Trends, German Marshall Fund of the United States

From the Key Findings:

The results of the 2011 Transatlantic Trends: Immigration survey capture U.S. and European public opinion on a range of immigration and integration issues. The most important highlights of this year’s survey show 1) there is a remarkable stability of general immigration opinions over time, 2) the public supports European Union burden-sharing on migration resulting from the Arab Spring and increasingly favors European responsibility for setting immigrant admissions numbers, and 3) the public tends to favor highly educated immigrants but still prefers immigrants with a job offer.

Now in its fourth year, Transatlantic Trends: Immigration (TTI) measures public opinion on immigration and integration issues on both sides of the Atlantic. The countries included in the 2011 version of the survey were the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. When the report refers to European respondents, it is only meant to refer to the opinions of those in the five European countries surveyed this year.

Key Findings (PDF)
Topline Data (PDF)

Unauthorized Immigrants: Length of Residency, Patterns of Parenthood

By: Paul Taylor, Mark Hugo Lopez, Jeffrey Passel, and Seth Motel
Source: Pew Hispanic Center

From Overview:

Nearly two-thirds of the 10.2 million unauthorized adult immigrants in the United States have lived in this country for at least 10 years and nearly half are parents of minor children, according to new estimates by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center.

These estimates are based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s March 2010 Current Population Survey, augmented with the Center’s analysis of the demographic characteristics of the unauthorized immigrant population using a “residual estimation methodology” that the Center has employed for many years.

Complete Report (PDF)

Mortgage Meltdown and the Future of Suburbia

Death of the Fringe Suburb
Christopher B. Leinberger | New York Times
November 25, 2011
This Op-Ed piece describes the confluence of empty nesters downsizing and millenials who favor urban downtowns increasing the demand for housing in walkable neighborhoods. He suggests that we should be investing in carless transit options.

To Rethink Sprawl, Start with Offices
Louise A. Mozingo | New York Times
November 25, 2011
This Op-Ed piece discusses the unsustainable suburban office complexes. The author suggests that suburban jurisdictions should demand transit links to the adjacent residential developments – not just plentiful parking. Likewise, some corporations will re-occupy the city centers they abandoned several generations ago.

Animal McMansion: Students Trade Dorm for Suburban Luxury
Patricia Leigh Brown | New York Times
November 12, 2011
The downturn in the real estate market in Merced, Calif., has presented an unusual housing opportunity for thousands of students attending the University of California.

The Economic Impact of Immigrant-Related Local Ordinances

The Economic Impact of Immigrant-Related Local Ordinances
Source: The Americas Society

From the publication page:

This Americas Society white paper provides the first comparative look at the average economic effects of how restrictive versus non-restrictive immigration-related city ordinances affect a city’s business environment. In a context of high unemployment and lackluster business growth, along with rising anxieties regarding immigration in the United States, we believe it essential to provide a better understanding of how policies that seek to restrict immigration and those that support more flexible approaches affect the economies of communities across the country.

Download the PDF of the white paper
Access an appendix of sources for city ordinances (PDF)

Population Grows in Twenty EU Member States

Population Grows in Twenty EU Member States
Source: Eurostat

From press release (PDF):

On 1 January 2011, the population of the EU27 was estimated at 502.5 million, compared with 501.1 million on 1 January 2010. The population of the EU27 grew by 1.4 million in 2010, an annual rate of +2.7 per 1000 inhabitants, due to a natural increase of 0.5 million (+1.0‰) and net migration of 0.9 million (+1.7‰).

The population of the euro area (EA17) was estimated at 332.0 million on 1 January 2011, compared with 330.9 million on 1 January 2010. The population of the euro area grew by 1.0 million in 2010, an annual rate of +3.1‰, due to a natural increase of 0.3 million (+1.0‰) and net migration of 0.7 million (+2.1‰).

Full press release (PDF)
Full report (PDF)

Head Start and the Changing Demographics of Today’s Young Children

Head Start and the Changing Demographics of Today’s Young Children
By: Oliva Golden
Source: Urban Institute

Abstract:

The increasing diversity of America’s young children has important implications for Head Start and Early Head Start programs. This paper summarizes recent changes in the racial and ethnic composition of young children, particularly increases in Hispanic and Asian children, as well as shifts in where young children live, with some northeastern and Midwestern states losing children while southern and southwestern states are rapidly gaining. Based on these trends and recent Urban Institute research, the paper makes four recommendations about how local Head Start practitioners can best meet the needs of today’s young children and their families.

Full text (PDF)