Archive for the 'Population Dynamics' Category

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Generations and Partisanship

The Pew Research Center released a report examining the political leanings of different generations: A Different Look at Generations and Partisanship (PDF is here).

See also: A Deep Dive Into Party Affiliation (PDF here).

Gender Gap in the U.S. Black Population

According to Justin Wolfers, David Leonhardt and Kevin Quealy of The Upshot, there are roughly 1.5 million black men missing from the 25 to 54 age group due to incarceration and early death. “For every 100 black women in this age group living outside of jail, there are only 83 black men. Among whites, the equivalent number is 99, nearly parity.”

Read the full story and here is the methodology.

The Increase of Singles Changes City Housing

Emily Badger of Wonkblog examines the rising trend of single people living alone and what that will mean for city housing.

See also: Compact Units: Demand and Challenges from NYU Furman Center.

Black Immigration to the U.S.

According to a new report from the Pew Research Center, 8.7% of the U.S. black population is foreign born, nearly triple what it was in 1980.

Rapid growth in the black immigrant population is expected to continue. The Census Bureau projects that by 2060, 16.5% of U.S. blacks will be immigrants. In certain metropolitan areas, foreign-born blacks make up a significant share of the overall black population. For example, among the metropolitan areas with the largest black populations, roughly a third of blacks (34%) living in the Miami metro area are immigrants. In the New York metro area, that share is 28%. And in the Washington, D.C., area, it is 15%.

Download the complete report (PDF)

See also: 6 key findings about black immigration to the U.S.

Majority Minority Counties

The Pew Research Center analyzed Census data and found that between 2000 to 2013, 78 counties in 19 states changed from majority white population to populations where no racial or ethnic group is in the majority (their analysis only includes counties with populations of 10,000 or more in 2013).

Millennials and Urban Living

Jed Kolko follows up Ben Casselman’s article Think Millennials Prefer the City? Think Again in FiveThirtyEight with some explanations of why this generation is less urban.

Most urban neighborhoods are not Brooklyn, and most 25- to 34-year-olds don’t have bachelor’s degrees.

Racial Attitudes of White Millennials Are Not Much Different than their Parents’

Scott Clement of the Wonkblog examines five measures of racial prejudice from 3 waves of the General Social Survey conducted by NORC and finds that generally White attitudes towards Black people have not changed much since the Baby Boomers.

Backcasting Native Hawaiian Population

The Pew Research Center Fact Tank examines findings by David Swanson which uses 1910 and 1920 Census data to estimate the population of Hawaii in 1778, the year Capt. James Cook arrived.

In this case, Swanson took a detailed look at the 1910 and 1920 U.S. Census’s Native Hawaiian counts, tracking the survival rate of each five-year age group from one census to the next. For example, he looked at how many children who were newborns to age 4 in 1910 were counted as 10- to 14-year-olds in 1920, then did the same for each successive age group. For each group, he created a “reverse cohort change ratio,” which he used to go back in time and estimate the size of each age group for each decade until he got to 1770.

The article also reports on the growth of the Native Hawaiian population since the 1980s.

Changes in Global Religion

The Pew Research Center used demographic data from 198 countries to examine the ways the global religious landscape will change:

7 Key Changes in the Global Religious Landscape
– Full report: The Future of World Religions: Population Growth Projections, 2010-2050
Interactive Global Religious Futures website

PRB Webinar: Mapping Research Approaches to the Demographic Dividend

WHEN: Thursday, Apr. 23, 2015, from 10:00 AM–11:00 AM (EDT) (GMT-4)

From the e-mail:

The demographic dividend offers a powerful argument linking population dynamics and economic development. This topic has attracted a wide variety of researchers and international development organizations and has recently gained traction among global policy audiences. However, research approaches to the demographic dividend are varied and a greater integration of the methodological approaches may be warranted.

More information and register