Archive for the 'Human Capital, Labor & Wealth' Category

The Middle Class in 30 U.S. Cities

Quoctrung Bui of Planet Money used family income data from the 2013 American Community Survey to examine how much income it takes to be middle class in 30 U.S. cities. Detroit requires the lowest income, and San Jose, CA requires the highest.

H/T Wonkblog

Measuring College Readiness

Mikhail Zinshteyn of FiveThirtyEight examines measures of college readiness and the various ways they fail:

Before we can implement policies designed to shepherd more of this country’s residents toward a college degree, we must actually know what makes a student college-ready. But what if our definitions of college readiness are incomplete, or worse, painting an unreasonably dour picture of how prepared U.S. students are for the rigors of college?

“Everyone has their own definition of college readiness, which makes it a little tricky,” said Jack Buckley, the head of research at the College Board, who previously led the Department of Education’s research arm.

So tricky, in fact, that there’s sharp disagreement over whether test scores or high school grades are better predictors of college readiness.

Consumer Spending By Age Group in 2013

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released an interactive chart showing Percent distribution of expenditures for all consumer units, by age, 2013, annual averages.

H/T Data Detectives

Prisons Without Bars

Mark A.R. Kleinman, Angela Hawken and Ross Halperin propose a new solution to high incarceration rates, difficult re-entry into society and high recidivism rates.

For the transition from prison to life outside to be successful, it needs to be gradual. If someone needed to be locked up yesterday, he shouldn’t be completely at liberty today. And he shouldn’t be asked to go from utter dependency to total self-sufficiency in one flying leap. He needs both more control and more support. Neither alone is likely to do the job.

H/T Wonkblog

Comparing Generations

The Pew Research Center published an interactive chart comparing different generations’s experiences in 2014 and “when they were young (18-33)”.

No Ceilings: The Full Participation Project

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the No Ceilings initiative of the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation published an interactive website marking the 20th anniversary of the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing.

In 1995, at the UN Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, leaders from governments and civil society around the world came together and committed to ensuring that women and girls have the opportunity to participate fully in all aspects of life.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of that moment. The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the No Ceilings initiative of the Bill, Hillary & Chelsea Clinton Foundation have joined forces to gather data and analyze the gains made for women and girls over the last two decades, as well as the gaps that remain.

This site and The Full Participation Report are the result—home to 850,000 data points, spanning more than 20 years, from over 190 countries. Through data visualizations and stories, we aim to present the gains and gaps in understandable, sharable ways—including by making the data open and easily available.

The full report and data are also available.

ACS Median Earnings by Detailed Occupation

The U.S. Census Bureau released 2013 Earnings by Sex and Detailed Occupation tables from the American Community Survey. Other tables include Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin by Occupation: 2012 and Median Earnings of College Graduates by Field of Bachelor’s Degree and Occupation: 2012.

All table packages are here.

H/T Data Detectives

SNAP Receipt for Households, 2000-2013

The U.S. Census Bureau released a new American Community Survey Brief, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Receipt for Households: 2000-2013.

Introduction:

This report presents data on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) receipt at the national and state levels based on the annual American Community Survey (ACS) from 2000 to 2013.1 In addition, this report discusses the current SNAP receipt rates for metropolitan statistical areas with large populations. The ACS question about SNAP identifies households in which one or more current members received SNAP during the past 12 months. Data reflect households, not individuals. If any person living at the sample address at the time of the interview received SNAP in the past 12 months, then the household is included in the estimate of SNAP participation.

H/T: Data Detectives

Robert Putnam On Growing Up Poor

An article in Wonkblog explores Robert Putnam’s new book Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis and the influence he has had on politicians as diverse as President Obama and congressman Paul Ryan.

From the article:

For the past three years, Putnam has been nursing an outlandish ambition. He wants inequality of opportunity for kids to be the central issue in the 2016 presidential election. Not how big government should be or what the “fair share” is for the wealthy, but what’s happening to children boxed out of the American dream.

His manifesto, “ Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis” will be published Tuesday. It places brain science, sociology and census data alongside stories of children growing up on both sides of the divide. Many of the findings draw on the work of other researchers who have long studied families, education or neuroscience. But Putnam has gathered up these strands under a single thesis: that instead of talking about inequality of wealth or income among adults, we ought to focus on inequalities in all of the ways children accumulate — or never touch — opportunity.

Time Use of the Nonemployed

Josh Katz of the NYTimes blog The Upshot pulled data from the American Time Use Survey to examine how nonemployed men and women spend their weekdays:

Nonworkers spend much more time doing housework. Men without jobs, in particular, spend more time watching television, while women without jobs spend more time taking care of others. And the nonemployed of both sexes spend more time sleeping than their employed counterparts.

Read the whole article, including interactive charts and graphs.