Monthly Archive for March, 2009

International Seminar on Social and Health Policies for Equity: Approaches and Strategies

Panel on Health Equity and Policy in the Arab World
Call for papers

International Seminar on Social and Health Policies for Equity: Approaches and Strategies

London, United Kingdom, 2-4 November 2009

Organized by the IUSSP Scientific Panel on Health Equity and Policy in the Arab World, the Social Research Center of the American University in Cairo, and University College London

Deadline for submission of abstracts: 1 July 2009.

http://www.iussp.org/Activities/hequity/call09.php

International Seminar on Gender and Empowerment in the 21st Century in Africa

Call for Papers

International Seminar on Gender and Empowerment in the 21st Century in Africa

Nairobi, Kenya, 24-26 August 2009

Organized by the IUSSP Scientific Panel on Gender
and the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC)

Deadline for submission of abstract: 15 May 2009.

The International development and policy agenda has galvanized global attention to issues of gender inequality and women’s empowerment through various international policy platforms like the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo and the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing. The importance of gender equality and women’s empowerment in achieving national and global development goals is underscored in the Millennium Development Goals (MDG), with the third goal (MDG 3) specifically addressing the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women. A mid-point assessment of global progress on the MDGs noted that “doors are opening slowly for women in the labor market”. However, women still account for over 60% of unpaid family workers (UN DESA, 2007); only 17% of members of single or lower houses of parliament; and more girls than boys remain out of school (UNSD, 2007).

<a href=”http://www.iussp.org/Activities/gender/call09.php”>http://www.iussp.org/Activities/gender/call09.php</a>

Two New Reports from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

A Profile of the Working Poor, 2007

In 2007, according to the Census Bureau, 37.3 million people, or 12.5 percent of the population, lived at or below the offi cial poverty level. Although the Nation’s poor were primarily children and adults who had not participated in the labor force during the year, 7.5 million were among the “working poor.” This level is slightly higher than the level reported in 2006. The working poor are individuals who spent at least 27 weeks in the labor force (working or looking for work), but whose incomes still fell below the offi cial poverty level. In 2007, the working poor rate–the ratio of the working poor to all individuals in the labor force for at least 27 weeks–was 5.1 percent, unchanged from the rate reported in 2006.

Full report (PDF)

Characteristics of Minimum Wage Workers: 2008

According to Current Population Survey estimates for 2008, 75.3 million American workers age 16 and over were paid at hourly rates, representing 58.2 percent of all wage and salary workers. On July 24, 2008, the Federal minimum wage increased to $6.55 per hour from $5.85 per hour. Data in this report reflect the average number of workers earning the prevailing Federal minimum wage or less for the year (those who earned $5.85 or less from January 2008 through July 2008 and those who earned $6.55 or less from August 2008 through the end of the year). Among those paid by the hour, 286,000 earned exactly the prevailing Federal minimum wage in 2008. About 1.9 million had wages below the minimum. Together, these 2.2 million workers with wages at or below the minimum made up 3.0 percent of all hourly-paid workers. Tables 1-10 present data on a wide array of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics for hourly-paid workers earning at or below the Federal minimum wage.

Full report (PDF)

Understanding Inequality in China

The Rackham School of Graduate Studies and Office of the Provost are pleased to invite you to Professor Yu Xie’s Distinguished University Professorship Lecture on April 1, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. in the Amphitheatre of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies Building. The lecture title is Understanding Inequality in China.

ABSTRACT

Drawing on past research, I advance the following propositions in this talk: (1) inequality in China has been largely mediated by collective agencies, such as locales and work units; (2) traditional Chinese political discourse promoted merit-based inequality, with merit being defined as improving the collective welfare for the masses; and (3) many Chinese people today regard inequality as an inevitable consequence of economic development. Thus, it seems unlikely that social inequality alone would lead to political and social unrest in today’s China.

Teen Birth Rates Up Slightly in 2007 for Second Consecutive Year

Births: Preliminary Data for 2007
Source: CDC′s National Center for Health Statistics

From the news release:

The birth rate for U.S. teens aged 15 to 19 increased by about 1 percent in 2007, from 41.9 births per 1,000 in 2006 to 42.5 in 2007, according to a report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This is the second year in a row that teen births have gone up. They increased 3 percent in 2006 following a 14-year decline.

Birth rates also increased for women in their 20s, 30s and early 40s, but remained unchanged for younger teens and pre-teens aged 10-14. Only Hispanic teens noted a decline in the birth rate, which fell 2 percent in 2007 to 81.7 births per 1,000.

Full report (PDF)

New Poverty, Gender, and Youth Working Paper from the Population Council

Marriage considerations in sending girls to school in Bangladesh: Some qualitative evidence
Sajeda Amin and Lopita Huq
Abstract; PDF
Multiple dimensions of urban well-being: Evidence from India
S. Chandrasekhar and Abhiroop Mukhopadhyay
Abstract; PDF

Open Access Week at the University Library

Open Access Week at the University Library
The University of Michigan University Library is hosting a week-long, campus-wide exploration of Open Access during the month of March. We define Open Access as free, permanent, full-text, online access to peer-reviewed scientific and scholarly material. The series of events will bring together scholars, publishers, authors, copyright experts, and librarians from a range of disciplines to discuss the impact of Open Access on academic research and publishing.

American Religious Identification Survey 2008

American Religious Identification Survey 2008
Principal Investigators: Barry A. Kosmin and Ariela Keysar
Source: The Institute for the Study of Secularism in Society and Culture (ISSSC), Trinity College
From press release:

Conducted between February and November of last year, ARIS 2008 is the third in a landmark series of large, nationally representative surveys of U.S. adults in the 48 contiguous states conducted by Kosmin and Ariela Keysar. Employing the same research methodology as the 1990 and 2001 surveys, ARIS 2008 questioned 54,461 adults in either English or Spanish. With a margin of error of less than 0.5 percent, it provides the only complete portrait of how contemporary Americans identify themselves religiously, and how that self-identification has changed over the past generation.

Download sections or full report (PDF)

Mini-Digest of Education Statistics, 2008

Mini-Digest of Education Statistics, 2008
Source: National Center for Education Statistics
This publication is a pocket-sized compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from kindergarten through graduate school. The statistical highlights are excerpts from the Digest of Education of Statistics, 2008.
Full document (PDF)
Edited to add:
The full Digest of Education Statistics, 2008 is now available. Download chapters or Full Document (PDF)

One in 31 U.S. Adults are Behind Bars, on Parole or Probation

One in 31 U.S. Adults are Behind Bars, on Parole or Probation
Contacts: Jessica Riordan and Andrew McDonald
Source: Pew Center on the States
From the press release:
Explosive growth in the number of people on probation or parole has propelled the population of the American corrections system to more than 7.3 million, or 1 in every 31 U.S. adults, according to a report released today by the Pew Center on the States. The vast majority of these offenders live in the community, yet new data in the report finds that nearly 90 percent of state corrections dollars are spent on prisons. One in 31: The Long Reach of American Corrections examines the scale and cost of prison, jail, probation and parole in each of the 50 states, and provides a blueprint for states to cut both crime and spending by reallocating prison expenses to fund stronger supervision of the large number of offenders in the community.
Final report (PDF)