Monthly Archive for August, 2009

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Achievement Gaps

Achievement Gaps: How Black and White Students in Public Schools Perform in Mathematics and Reading on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)
By: Alan Vanneman, Linda Hamilton, Janet Baldwin Anderson, Taslima Rahman
Source: National Center for Education Statistics
In 2007, mathematics scores for both Black and White public school students in grades 4 and 8 nationwide, as measured by the main NAEP assessments of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), were higher than in any previous assessment, going back to 1990. This was also true for Black and White fourth-graders on the NAEP 2007 Reading Assessment. For grade 8, reading scores for both Black and White students were higher in 2007 than in the first reading assessment year, 1992, as well as the most recent previous assessment year, 2005.
Executive Summary
Full report (PDF)

Unequal unemployment

Unequal unemployment—Racial disparities in unemployment vary widely by state
By: Algernon Austin
Source: Economic Policy Institute

The labor market crisis is breaking national records each month, with no end in sight. The heaviest burden is falling on blacks and Hispanics, who are contending with much higher unemployment rates than whites nationally—about one-and-a-half times as high for Hispanics and twice as high for blacks. According to an updated analysis through the second quarter of 2009 and new projections through 2010, the trend has worsened and is likely to continue to do so.

Full text (PDF)

This supplement, State Unemployment Trends by Race, Ethnicity and Gender, includes a national overview and takes a closer look at three hard-hit states: New York, Alabama, and Illinois and takes a closer look at three hard-hit states: New York, Alabama, and Illinois

Annual Medical Spending Attributable to Obesity: Payer- and Service-Specific Estimates

Annual Medical Spending Attributable to Obesity: Payer- and Service-Specific Estimates
By: Eric A. Finkelstein, Justin G. Trogdon, Joel W. Cohen, and William Dietz
Source: Health Affairs
ABSTRACT: In 1998 the medical costs of obesity were estimated to be as high as $78.5 billion, with roughly half financed by Medicare and Medicaid. This analysis presents updated estimates of the costs of obesity for the United States across payers (Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers), in separate categories for inpatient, non-inpatient, and prescription drug spending. We found that the increased prevalence of obesity is responsible for almost $40 billion of increased medical spending through 2006, including $7 billion in Medicare prescription drug costs. We estimate that the medical costs of obesity could have risen to $147 billion per year by 2008.
Full text (HTML)

New Discussion Papers from the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

The Economies of Scale of Living Together and How They Are Shared: Estimates Based on a Collective Household Model
Aline Bütikofer, Michael Gerfin
Abstract; PDF

Nonparametric Identification and Estimation of Nonadditive Hedonic Models
James J. Heckman, Rosa Matzkin, Lars Nesheim
Abstract; PDF

Does Schooling Affect Health Behavior? Evidence from the Educational Expansion in Western Germany
Hendrik Jürges, Steffen Reinhold, Martin Salm
Abstract; PDF

Immigration and Housing Booms: Evidence from Spain
Libertad Gonzalez, Francesc Ortega
Abstract; PDF

Another Look at the Identification at Infinity of Sample Selection Models
Xavier d’Haultfoeuille, Arnaud Maurel
Abstract; PDF

Setting the Minimum Wage
Tito Boeri
Abstract; PDF