Rescuing Federal Data

ICPSR has a new portal that allows the public to upload valuable government resources for preservation and dissemination – DATA LUMOS. These government files are snapshots of the data as it existed on the day it was harvested. Obviously, a live version is preferable, but if data disappear from government websites, the last known version is preferable to nothing. And, via crowd sourcing, this harvesting effort can be shared among many.

DATA LUMOS focuses on preserving federal social science data, interpreted broadly. Pollution data from the EPA would be relevant as would be daily temperature data from NASA. The main decision point is whether users of these data would think to search for it at ICPSR.

DATA LUMOS Announcement
ICPSR Webinar on DATA LUMOS

This is not the only “save the data” organization. A few weeks earlier there was an Ann Arbor Data Rescue event, part of a national Data Refuge project and the Internet Archive’s End of Term Presidential Harvest:

Library participates in effort to preserve government data
Lynne Raughley | University Record (University of Michigan)
February 1, 2017

Here are two other similar events:

Saving Data: Preservation during Political Turmoil
Andrew Battista | Data Dispatch (NYU Data Services)
January 26, 2017

Rogue Scientists Race to Save Climate Data from Trump
Zoe Schlanger | Wired
January 19, 2017

More background on some of the larger collaborations driving this:

DataRefuge Project

DataRefuge is also an initiative committed to identifying, assessing, prioritizing, securing, and distributing reliable copies of federal climate and environmental data so that it remains available to researchers. Data collected as part of the #DataRefuge initiative will be stored in multiple, trusted locations to help ensure continued accessibility

End of Term Presidential Harvest 2016

This is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO), the Library of Congress, the California Digital Library, the University of North Texas Libraries, Internet Archive, George Washington University Libraries, and Stanford University Libraries to harvest and preserve public U.S. Government websites at the conclusion of the current Presidential administration ending on January 20, 2017.

Note that this web harvest was done at the conclusion of other administrations, e.g., 2008 and 2012.

More on the “End of Term Presidential Harvest”
Harvesting Government History, One Web Page at a Time
Jim Dwyer | New York Times
December 1, 2016

Large portions of dot-gov have no mandate to be taken care of,” said Mark Phillips, a library dean at the University of North Texas, referring to government websites. “Nobody is really responsible for doing this.

Enter the End of Term Presidential Harvest 2016 — a volunteer, collaborative effort by a small group of university, government and nonprofit libraries to find and save valuable pages now on federal websites. The project began before the 2008 elections, when George W. Bush was serving his second term, and returned in 2012.

And, a few more interesting notes:

The EPA Just Posted a Mirror Website of the One Trump Plans to Censor
Matt Novak | Gizmodo.com
February 16, 2017

tweet

And, the Twitter poster above, is a one-man operation that rescues knowledge from the internet:

The Memory Hole

For instance, here are links to recently deleted items posted on the site:

The Education Department’s Deleted IDEA Website
The disappeared website about public education for disabled children still exists….

NASA’s Internal Counterintelligence Newsletter
Twenty-five issues of NASA’s newsletter about information security, terrorism, and spies.

Trump Deletions
A collection of online material deleted by Donald Trump, his campaign, and his transition team.


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