Quiz: Smoking During Pregnancy, 2014

Smoking During Pregnancy, 2014

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How We Die in Michigan

Julie Mack of MLive.com put together mortality statistics from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and found some interesting trends.

A century ago, in 1914, 13 percent of people died from heart disease and 6 percent from cancer. That’s an era when contagious disease and infection killed many people at a much younger age.

In 1964, a half-century ago, after the introduction of antibiotics, heart disease and cancer together accounted for 55 percent of Michigan deaths.

In recent years, heart disease has been declining as a cause of death, while cancer has been on the increase.

Remember: Causes of death are a zero-sum situation. Since everybody dies, if one cause goes down, another must increase.

See also: Michigan’s top 10 causes of death.

Pre-WWII Segregation In U.S. Cities

Emily Badger of Wonkblog, examines a paper by Allison Shertzer and Randall P. Walsh about how the arrival of blacks in 10 northern cities between 1900 and 1930 caused whites to sort themselves into different neighborhoods.

In their new research, they studied how the arrival of blacks in 10 northern cities at the time influenced white behavior. Over the course of the first three decades after the turn of the century, coinciding with the start of the Great Migration of blacks out of the South, this pattern accelerated: As blacks arrived in northern neighborhoods, more whites left. By the 1920s, there were more than three white departures for every black arrival.

NIA Has Updated It’s Strategic Directions

Richard Hodes, director of the National Institute on Aging, wrote in the Inside NIA bog about their updated version of the NIA’s Strategic Directions, Aging Well in the 21st Century.

NIA’s previous strategic approach was published in 2007. Since then, we have made a number of important revisions. Most critically, we have organized our approach into three “functional” areas:

  • Understanding the Dynamics of the Aging Process
  • Improving the Health, Well-Being, and Independence of Adults as they Age
  • Supporting the Research Enterprise

Read the full post.

New Quiz: Crash Data & Traffic Fatalities, 2014

Crash Data and Traffic Fatalities, 2014

Are secondary data users research parasites?

Even though NIH and NSF both have data sharing requirements, there is clearly some resistance to it. The best example is an editorial from the New England Journal of Medicine. Secondary data users are characterized as “research parasites.”

A rebuttal comes from a Science editorial with the title #IAmAResearchParasite.

Data Sharing
Dan L. Longo and Jeffrey Drazen | N Engl J Med
January 21, 2016

#IAmAResearchParasite
Marcia McNutt | Science
March 4, 2016

How Mass Incarceration of Black People Skews Our Sense of Reality

Jeff Guo of Wonkblog examines how the absence of 1.6 million people from economic statistics affects the decisions politicians and policymakers make:

Though there are nearly 1.6 million Americans in state or federal prison, their absence is not accounted for in the figures that politicians and policymakers use to make decisions. As a result, we operate under a distorted picture of the nation’s economic health.

There’s no simple way to estimate the impact of mass incarceration on the jobs market. But here’s a simple thought experiment. Imagine how the white and black unemployment rates would change if all the people in prison were added to the unemployment rolls.

New Quiz: Mortality Among Centenarians, 2000-2014

Centenarian: Age 100+ years
Death rate: number of deaths per 100 centenarians

Mortality Among Centenarians, 2010-2014

Lifetime Risk of HIV Diagnosis in U.S.

The CDC released a new Fact Sheet showing the lifetime risk of HIV diagnosis in the United States.

From the press release:

CDC researchers used diagnoses and death rates from 2009-2013 to project the lifetime risk of HIV diagnosis in the United States by sex, race and ethnicity, state, and HIV risk group, assuming diagnoses rates remain constant. Overall, the lifetime risk of HIV diagnosis in the U.S. is now 1 in 99, an improvement from a previous analysis using 2004-2005 data that reported overall risk at 1 in 78.

Demographic and Economic Profiles of the Super Tuesday States

In advance of Super Tuesday, the U.S. Census Bureau released demographic and economic profiles of the 12 states holding primaries and caucuses:

H/T Data Detectives