Another take on gentrification

Gentrification in America Report
Mike Maciag | Governing
February 2015
This resource is city-specific and provides both counts and maps of gentrified census tracts for the 50 largest cities. To be eligible for gentrification a census tract’s median household income and median home value were both in the bottom 40th percentile of all tracts within a metro area at the beginning of the decade. The gentrified tracts recorded increases in the top third percentile for both measures when compared to all others in a metro area.

Methodology

And more broadly, this resource has a special issue on gentrification:

The G-Word: A Special Series on Gentrification
The titles in this series are:
Do Cities Need Kids?
The Neighborhood Has Gentrified, But Where’s the Grocery Store?
Just Green Enough
Gentrification’s Not So Black and White After All
The Downsides of a Neighborhood ‘Turnaround
Some Cities Are Spurring the End of Sprawl
Keeping Cities from Becoming “Child-Free Zones”
From Vacant to Vibrant: Cincinnati’s Urban Transformation
Can Cities Change the Face of Biking?

Geography of Class, Education, and Income in the United States

ArcGIS has three interactive maps showing “the current occupational class, income and educational landscape across the United States. These maps allow the user to explore the various socio-economic divides that exist in our cities and towns at the census tract level.”

President Obama Appoints the First U.S. Chief Data Scientist

President Obama recently appointed Dr. DJ Patil the Deputy U.S. CTO for Data Policy and Chief Data Scientist.

Read Patil’s Memo to the American People from February 20 and watch his address, Data Science: Where are We Going? with an introduction by President Obama.

The Hedometer Index

This is an index of happiness created from tweets. The index provides a daily score, which can be toggled to exclude weekends, Mondays, etc.

Hedometer Index

This is an excellent resource because the creators of this happiness index describe the calculation of the index, the words used in it, provide an API, have links to articles based on the index, etc. It is a valuable resource, even if you do not care about happiness as it provides a template for many other uses of data from Twitter.

Instructions [Documenation of index via video or written - click on links]
Words [Words used in index, ranks, etc.]
Blog [The Computational Story Lab. . . mostly related to happiness]
Press [press coverage]
Papers [refereed papers by research team]
Talks [maybe you need a clip for a lecture]
API [lots of examples]

Move over Index of Consumer Sentiment/Expectations?

I ran across this in the Wall Street Journal (slide 58 of 93):

Can happiness from tweets reduce drawdowns from selling VIX?

Selling VIX futures has been profitable historically. However, the strategy can be subject to drawdowns, when there is risk aversion . . . . Using the Hedometer index as an input, we have created a Happiness Sentiment Index (HSI), which can be sued to proxy market risk sentiment. . . .

HSI index

See next post for more on the Hedometer Index.

U.S. Income Inequality in 2 Graphs

graph of income growth 1917 to 2012

Quoctrung Bui of Planet Money used the World Top Incomes Database to construct 2 graphs showing the fall and rise of U.S. income inequality from 1920-2012.

Formatting Data in R

image of data

Nathan Yau of Flowing Data recently published a tutorial on loading data and basic formatting in R. The tutorial covers loading data from CSV files, subsetting data frames, editing data to make it easier to manage and merging multiple datasets.

Lynchings in America

lynchings_map

[click here for link to NYT graphic]

The Equal Justice Initiative has documented 4,000 lynchings in the South between 1870 and 1950. This resource is potentially useful for examining out-migration of blacks, particularly men, from the South during this era. It could also be useful for explaining current race-based inequalities, including incarceration.

Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror
Summary Report | Equal Justice Initiative
February 2015

Supplement: Lynchings by County [pdf only]

Note that the graphic by the New York Times has a time-dimension in it. I am awaiting the full report from the Equal Justice Initiative to see what additional detail is available in it.

Press Coverage [scroll down]

Diminishing Returns of Incarceration

In an article for the FiveThirtyEight website, Oliver Roeder discusses a report he co-authored with Lauren-Brooke Eisen and Julia Bowling for the Brennan Center for Justice which examines the limited effect of incarceration on crime rates.

Report abstract:

What Caused the Crime Decline? examines one of the nation’s least understood recent phenomena – the dramatic decline in crime nationwide over the past two decades – and analyzes various theories for why it occurred, by reviewing more than 40 years of data from all 50 states and the 50 largest cities. It concludes that over-harsh criminal justice policies, particularly increased incarceration, which rose even more dramatically over the same period, were not the main drivers of the crime decline. In fact, the report finds that increased incarceration has been declining in its effectiveness as a crime control tactic for more than 30 years. Its effect on crime rates since 1990 has been limited, and has been non-existent since 2000.

More important were various social, economic, and environmental factors, such as growth in income and an aging population. The introduction of CompStat, a data-driven policing technique, also played a significant role in reducing crime in cities that introduced it.

The report concludes that considering the immense social, fiscal, and economic costs of mass incarceration, programs that improve economic opportunities, modernize policing practices, and expand treatment and rehabilitation programs, all could be a better public safety investment.

FiveThirtyEight article, The Imprisoner’s Dilemma
Brennan Center for Justice Report, What Caused the Crime Decline?

Segregation in 20th Century America

Emily Badger of Wonkblog discusses a new study by Trevon Logan and John Parman which examines the rise of segregation in the United States from 1880 to 1940 using the Census records gathered by counters walking door-to-door, “They show patterns of fine-grained racial segregation that are impossible to see in public Census data today where privacy concerns override precision.”

Read the full Wonkblog article.
Logan and Parman’s paper, “The National Rise in Residential Segregation”.