Smoking rate stays high among the poor

While smoking began as a practice among the well-off, according to a study published in Population Health Metrics, the habit is now much more prevalent in the working and poor classes.

New York Times article

Full text of the study

Mapping Twitter

Source: Pew Research Internet Project
By: Marc A. Smith, Lee Rainie, Ben Shneiderman, and Itai Himelboim

Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters

Conversations on Twitter create networks with identifiable contours as people reply to and mention one another in their tweets. These conversational structures differ, depending on the subject and the people driving the conversation. Six structures are regularly observed: divided, unified, fragmented, clustered, and inward and outward hub and spoke structures. These are created as individuals choose whom to reply to or mention in their Twitter messages and the structures tell a story about the nature of the conversation.

Overview
Complete Report (PDF)
Infographic: The six types of Twitter conversations

Big Data Initiative at NIH-OBSSR

From the Connector blog post:

The NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) initiative is designed to address these issues and facilitate broad use of biomedical big data through new data sharing policies, catalogs of datasets, and training. Behavioral and social scientists should be aware of several recently-issued RFAs. In these RFAs NIH is requesting applications for Centers of Excellence, Data Coordination Centers, training enhancement, and data facilitation. If you are involved in mHealth, this might be a great opportunity for you, or if you are pooling data for the purposes of GxE interaction studies in the behavioral and social sciences this initiative might also fit you well. Critically consider your current research and ways that Big Data may already be part of your portfolio.

Read the full post
NIH Big Data to Knowledge (BD2K) website

Obama Budget Proposes Only Modest Increases for Research Spending

By: Paul Basken
Source: Chronicle of Higher Education

The budget proposes an increase of $30.4 billion, which when inflation is accounted for, is a cut of 1%. NSF, NASA and the Department of Defense fare little better.

Read the full Chronicle article here

Working Papers from the NBER

Voting to Tell Others
by Stefano DellaVigna, John A. List, Ulrike Malmendier, Gautam Rao
Abstract; PDF

Can You Leave High School Behind?
by Sandra E. Black, Jane Arnold Lincove, Jenna Cullinane, Rachel Veron
Abstract; PDF

Where is the Land of Opportunity? The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the United States
by Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez
Abstract; PDF

Is the United States Still a Land of Opportunity? Recent Trends in Intergenerational Mobility
by Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez, Nicholas Turner
Abstract; PDF

Equilibrium Health Spending and Population Aging in a Model of Endogenous Growth – Will the GDP Share of Health Spending Keep Rising?
by Isaac Ehrlich, Yong Yin
Abstract; PDF

How Johnson Fought the War on Poverty: The Economics and Politics of Funding at the Office of Economic Opportunity
by Martha J. Bailey, Nicolas J. Duquette
Abstract; PDF

The (Surprising) Efficacy of Academic and Behavioral Intervention with Disadvantaged Youth: Results from a Randomized Experiment in Chicago
by Philip J. Cook, Kenneth Dodge, George Farkas, Roland G. Fryer, Jr, Jonathan Guryan, Jens Ludwig, Susan Mayer, Harold Pollack, Laurence Steinberg
Abstract; PDF

Media Influences on Social Outcomes: The Impact of MTV’s 16 and Pregnant on Teen Childbearing
by Melissa S. Kearney, Phillip B. Levine
Abstract; PDF

Waging War on Poverty: Historical Trends in Poverty Using the Supplemental Poverty Measure
by Liana Fox, Irwin Garfinkel, Neeraj Kaushal, Jane Waldfogel, Christopher Wimer
Abstract; PDF

The Measure Demographic Health Surveys Changes Name and Scope

DHS Program Logo
From the new DHS Program blog:

[So in 2013,] when USAID’s MEASURE umbrella ceased to be, it was clear that we needed to be something more than simply “DHS”. But what? At first glance, “The Demographic and Health Surveys Program” or “The DHS Program” seems like an innocuous project name. But to us, it represents a lot more.

As a Program, we are representing not one contract with USAID, but 30 years of data collection in more than 90 countries.

As a Program, we are not just our flagship household survey, but a suite of surveys, data management, biomarker testing and GIS and research activities.

As a Program, we encompass far more than just data collection, but are charged with strengthening capacity, communicating complex information, analyzing data, and ensuring that DHS data are used to inform decisions all over the globe to improve the health of families and communities.

Read the full announcement.

New DHS Program website

UM Now Has Access to IndiaStat

Via Jungwon Yang:

The University of Michigan Library is pleased to announce that we now access to Indiastat which is a database provides key statistics of India, including census, election, trade, education, health data and more.

To access the data, please click on a link called “IP Login” at the top of the main page.
We subscribe a single user option, so please remind users to logout when they finish to explore the data. ( If a current user does not use the database over 15 minutes, then Indiastat will automatically disconnect the accession of data).

Access IndiaStat here: http://www.lib.umich.edu/database/link/31254

Decomposition of Future Population Growth

From the UNFPA website:

The main objective of the decomposition tool is to provide evidence and analysis that countries can use to develop policies and programmes aimed to find a balance between demographic change and social, economic and environmental goals.

This program calculates the contributions of different demographic factors (wanted and un-wanted fertility, mortality, migration, and age structure) to population growth. It is based on the medium variant population projection of the United Nations from 2010 to 2050 for all countries and main regions.

Select a country or region from the window below to view the results of the decomposition tool. Move mouse over the figures to explore the interactive data content. Then read and download a report summarizing the results, methods, and policy implications.

Learn more and use the tool on the website.

Working Papers from the NBER

Could a Website Really Have Doomed the Health Exchanges? Multiple Equilibria, Initial Conditions and the Construction of the Fine
by Florian Scheuer, Kent Smetters #19835
Abstract; PDF

Short-run Effects of Job Loss on Health Conditions, Health Insurance, and Health Care Utilization
by Jessamyn Schaller, Ann Huff Stevens #19884
Abstract; PDF

A Macroeconomic Framework for Quantifying Systemic Risk
by Zhiguo He, Arvind Krishnamurthy #19885
Abstract; PDF

Does Female Empowerment Promote Economic Development?
by Matthias Doepke, Michele Tertilt #19888
Abstract; PDF

Health, Financial Incentives, and Early Retirement: Micro-Simulation Evidence for Germany
by Hendrik Juerges, Lars Thiel, Tabea Bucher-Koenen, Johannes Rausch, Morten Schuth, Axel Boersch-Supan #19889
Abstract; PDF

Scale and Skill in Active Management
by Lubos Pastor, Robert F. Stambaugh, Lucian A. Taylor #19891
Abstract; PDF

Divorce Risk, Wages, and Working Wives: A Quantitative Life-Cycle Analysis of Female Labor Force Participation
by Raquel Fernandez, Joyce C. Wong #19869
Abstract; PDF

Tobacco Control Campaign in Uruguay: Impact on Smoking Cessation during Pregnancy
by Jeffrey E. Harris, Ana Ines Balsa, Patricia Triunfo #19878
Abstract; PDF

The Economics of Online Postsecondary Education: MOOCs, Nonselective Education, and Highly Selective Education
by Caroline M. Hoxby #19816
Abstract; PDF

Marry Your Like: Assortative Mating and Income Inequality
by Jeremy Greenwood, Nezih Guner, Georgi Kocharkov, Cezar Santos #19829
Abstract; PDF

NIH adds substantial set of genetic, health information to online database

Researchers will now have access to genetic data linked to medical information on a diverse group of more than 78,000 people, enabling investigations into many diseases and conditions. The data, from one of the nation’s largest and most diverse genomics projects — Genetic Epidemiology Research on Aging (GERA) — have just been made available to qualified researchers through the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), an online genetics database of the National Institutes of Health.

Details can found here.