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H. Luke Shaefer

The 20-item Word List Test as a Measure of Cognitive Functioning in the HRS: Norms and Validity for White, African-American and Hispanic Respondents

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Fillenbaum, Gerda G., Bruce M. Burchett, and Kathleen A. Welsh. "The 20-item Word List Test as a Measure of Cognitive Functioning in the HRS: Norms and Validity for White, African-American and Hispanic Respondents." AHEAD/HRS Report No. 94-005. December 1993.

The Health and Retirement Survey includes among its measures of cognitive functioning a 20-item Word List Learning task from which measures of immediate recall, delayed recall and savings (delayed recall/immediate recall) can be derived. Those with preferred demographic condition (white, increased education, younger) and better physical and mental health have better recall scores, so suggesting that this task is a valid measure of cognitive functioning.

Norms have been developed for subcategories of race, gender, education and age. Recall performance may help to identify those experiencing difficulty the job, those may be prone to retire, those less likely to obtain or retain new employment, and those with incipient dementia.

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