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Frey and colleagues outline 10 trends showing scale of America's demographic transitions

Starr says surveys intended to predict recidivism assign higher risk to poor

Prescott and colleagues find incidence of noncompetes in U.S. labor force varies by job, state, worker education

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PAA 2015 Annual Meeting: Preliminary program and list of UM participants

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PSC Fall 2014 Newsletter now available

Martha Bailey and Nicolas Duquette win Cole Prize for article on War on Poverty

Next Brown Bag

Mon, March 9
Luigi Pistaferri, Consumption Inequality and Family Labor Supply

Disentangling the Effects of Disability Status and Gender on the Labor Supply of Anglo, Black, and Latino Older Workers

Archived Abstract of Former PSC Researcher

Santiago, Anna Maria, and Clara G. Muschkin. 1996. "Disentangling the Effects of Disability Status and Gender on the Labor Supply of Anglo, Black, and Latino Older Workers." The Gerontologist, 36(3): 299-310.

Utilizing data from the 1991 Health and Retirement Study Early Release File, this article examines the effects of disability status on labor force participation and earnings of preretirement workers aged 50 to 64. Results from our hierarchical regression models suggest that poor health and the presence of a work disability signficantly reduced the labor force participation and earnings of older men and women. These analyses also suggest that economic well-being was constrained by the costs associated with additional "minority statuses." For example, the odds of being employed were reduced by approximately 46 percent for black men with disabilities. Further, the earnings of black men were 17 percent lower than the earnings of their nondisabled counterparts.

Dataset(s): Health and Retirement Study: U.S., 1991.

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