Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

The Economist cites Inglehart in piece on strength of populists

Ela and Budnick find higher unintended pregnancy risk among non-heterosexual women

Patrick, Schulenberg et al. find trends in frequent binge drinking among teens vary by race, sex, SES

More News

Highlights

Bailey, Eisenberg , and Fomby promoted at PSC

Former PSC trainee Eric Chyn wins PAA's Dorothy S. Thomas Award for best paper

Celebrating departing PSC trainees

Bloome finds children raised outside stable 2-parent families more likely to become low-income adults, regardless of parents' income

More Highlights

Thomas C. Buchmueller photo

Effect of the Affordable Care Act on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage

Publication Abstract

Buchmueller, Thomas C., Z. Levinson, Helen Levy, and B. Wolfe. 2016. "Effect of the Affordable Care Act on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage." American Journal of Public Health, 106(8): 1416-1421.

We used data from the American Community Survey (2008-2014) to document how health insurance coverage changed for white, black, and Hispanic non-elderly adults after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) went into effect. We examined changes in the percentage of each group who were uninsured, covered by Medicaid, or covered by private health insurance, stratifying by income and state Medicaid expansion status.

We found that in 2013, 40.5% of Hispanics and 25.8% of blacks were uninsured, compared with 14.8% of whites. We found a larger gap in private insurance, which was partially offset by higher rates of public coverage among blacks and Hispanics. After the main ACA provisions went into effect in 2014, coverage disparities declined slightly as the percentage of adults who were uninsured decreased by 7.1 percentage points for Hispanics, 5.1 percentage points for blacks, and 3 percentage points for whites. Coverage gains were greater in states that expanded Medicaid programs.

Although the ACA has reduced racial/ethnic disparities in coverage, substantial disparities remain. We posit that further reductions will require Medicaid expansion by more states and improved program take-up in states that have already done so.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2016.303155 (Full Text)

ISBN: 1541-0048

PMCID: PMC4940635. (Pub Med Central)

AltMetrics Info

Browse | Search : All Pubs