Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Survey that provided telling look into how Detroit blacks viewed 1967 riot largely ignored

Newly released report on the Detroit metro area's housing trends

Eisenberg says college athletes much less likely than other students to seek help with mental health conditions

More News

Highlights

Neal Krause wins GSA's Robert Kleemeier Award

U-M awarded $58 million to develop ideas for preventing and treating health problems

Bailey, Eisenberg , and Fomby promoted at PSC

Former PSC trainee Eric Chyn wins PAA's Dorothy S. Thomas Award for best paper

More Highlights

Thomas C. Buchmueller photo

Effect of the Affordable Care Act on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage

Publication Abstract

Buchmueller, Thomas C., Z. Levinson, Helen Levy, and B. Wolfe. 2016. "Effect of the Affordable Care Act on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Insurance Coverage." American Journal of Public Health, 106(8): 1416-1421.

We used data from the American Community Survey (2008-2014) to document how health insurance coverage changed for white, black, and Hispanic non-elderly adults after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) went into effect. We examined changes in the percentage of each group who were uninsured, covered by Medicaid, or covered by private health insurance, stratifying by income and state Medicaid expansion status.

We found that in 2013, 40.5% of Hispanics and 25.8% of blacks were uninsured, compared with 14.8% of whites. We found a larger gap in private insurance, which was partially offset by higher rates of public coverage among blacks and Hispanics. After the main ACA provisions went into effect in 2014, coverage disparities declined slightly as the percentage of adults who were uninsured decreased by 7.1 percentage points for Hispanics, 5.1 percentage points for blacks, and 3 percentage points for whites. Coverage gains were greater in states that expanded Medicaid programs.

Although the ACA has reduced racial/ethnic disparities in coverage, substantial disparities remain. We posit that further reductions will require Medicaid expansion by more states and improved program take-up in states that have already done so.

DOI:10.2105/AJPH.2016.303155 (Full Text)

ISBN: 1541-0048

PMCID: PMC4940635. (Pub Med Central)

AltMetrics Info

Browse | Search : All Pubs