Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Shaefer and Edin's book ($2 a Day) cited in piece on political debate over plight of impoverished Americans

Eisenberg tracks factors affecting both mental health and athletic/academic performance among college athletes

Shapiro says Americans' low spending reflects "cruel lesson" about the dangers of debt

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Xiaogang Wu photo

Embracing the Market: Entry to Self-Employment in Transitional China, 1978 -1996

Publication Abstract

Download PDF versionWu, Xiaogang. 2002. "Embracing the Market: Entry to Self-Employment in Transitional China, 1978 -1996." PSC Research Report No. 02-526. August 2002.

This paper introduces labor market transition as an intervening process by which the overarching institutional transition to a market economy alters social stratification outcome. Rather than directly address income distribution, it examines the pattern of workers' entry to self-employment in reform-era China (1978-1996), focusing on rural-urban differences and the temporal trend. Analyses of data from a national representative survey in China show that education, party membership and cadre status all deter urban workers' entry to self-employment, while education promotes rural workers' entry to self-employment. As marketization proceeds, the rate of entry to self-employment increases in both rural and urban China, but urban workers are increasingly more likely to take advantages of new market opportunities. In urban China, college graduates and cadres are still less likely to be involved in self-employment, but they are becoming more likely to do so in the later phase of reform. The diversity of transition scenarios is attributed to the variations in concrete institutional environments.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next