Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Hindustan Times points out high value of H-1B visas for US innovation, welfare, and tech firm profits

Novak, Geronimus, Martinez-Cardoso: Threat of deportation harmful to immigrants' health

Students from two worlds learn from one another in Morenoff's Inside-Out class

More News

Highlights

Heather Ann Thompson wins Pulitzer Prize for book on Attica uprising

Lam explores dimensions of the projected 4 billion increase in world population before 2100

ISR's Nick Prieur wins UMOR award for exceptional contribution to U-M's research mission

How effectively can these nations handle outside investments in health R&D?

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, April 10, 2017, noon:
Elizabeth Bruch

William G. Axinn photo

Mothers' Reports of Children's Family Formation Behavior

Publication Abstract

Axinn, William G., Arland Thornton, Lishou Yang, Linda C. Young-DeMarco, and Yu Xie. 2002. "Mothers' Reports of Children's Family Formation Behavior." Social Science Research, 31(2): 257-283.

In this article we explore methods for using mothers' interviews to gather data on their children's family formation experiences. These methods constitute a cost-efficient means of gathering data for models of family background that include both intergenerational and sibling influences. To judge the utility of these methods, we examine the quality of mothers' reports across a range of their children's family formation behaviors. The dimensions of reporting quality we analyze include completeness, precision, and accuracy of mothers' reports. We use unique data from personal inter-views with mother-child pairs to test the accuracy of these mothers' reports. The results demonstrate that, with some behaviors, a flexible data collection approach can gather complete, precise, and accurate information on an entire sibling set by interviewing mothers. Our examination of data quality also suggests important limits on the use of this approach. The quality of mothers' reports depends on the subject matter, with mothers providing lower quality reports of their children's cohabitation behavior compared to their children's marital, childbearing, and divorce behavior. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

DOI:10.1006/ssre.2001.0729 (Full Text)

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next