Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Bleakley says reversing US trade policies could be 'recipe for slowdown'

ISR's Scott Page cited on 'bee swarm' social influence in crowd response to Trump

Novak, Geronimus, and Martinez-Cardoso find fear of immigration can affect Latino birth outcomes

More News

Highlights

Post-doc fellowship in computational social science for summer or fall 2017, U-Penn

ICPSR Summer Program scholarships to support training in statistics, quantitative methods, research design, and data analysis

ISR Next Generation Awards: Support for pre-docs and early-career researchers in the social sciences

Workshops on EndNote, NIH reporting, and publication altmetrics, Jan 26 through Feb 7, ISR

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Feb 13, 2017 at noon:
Daniel Almirall

William Axinn photo

Mass Education and Fertility Transition

Publication Abstract

Axinn, William, and Jennifer S. Barber. 2001. "Mass Education and Fertility Transition." American Sociological Review, 66(4): 481-505.

The relationship between the spread of mass education and fertility-limiting behavior is examined. Existing theories relating education to fertility limitation are integrated, including those relating the presence of educational opportunity to fertility decline, theories relating women's education to their fertility behavior and theories relating children's education to the fertility behavior of their parents. Using survey data from a sample of 5,271 residents of 171 neighborhoods in rural Nepal, the individual-level mechanisms linking community-level changes in educational opportunity to fertility behavior are tested. A woman's proximity to a school during childhood dramatically increases permanent contraceptive use in adulthood. This finding is largely independent of whether the woman subsequently attended school, whether her husband attended school, whether she lived near a school in adulthood, and whether she sent her children to school. Strong fertility limitation effects were also found for husband's education and for currently living near a school. These effects were independent of other education-related measures. The largest education-related effect is for sending children to school.

Licensed Access Link

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next