Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Kusunoki says contraception use patterns suggest greater risk of unintended pregnancy among poor

Groves keynote speaker at MIDAS symposium, Nov 15-16: "Big Data: Advancing Science, Changing the World"

Shaefer says drop child tax credit in favor of universal, direct investment in American children

More News


Gonzalez, Alter, and Dinov win NSF "Big Data Spokes" award for neuroscience network

Post-doc Melanie Wasserman wins dissertation award from Upjohn Institute

ISR kicks off DE&I initiative with lunchtime presentation: Oct 13, noon, 1430 ISR Thompson

U-M ranked #4 in USN&WR's top public universities

More Highlights

Next Brown Bag

Mon, Nov 7 at noon:

Jennifer S. Barber photo

Ideational Influences on the Transition to Parenthood: Attitudes Towards Childbearing and Competing Alternatives

Publication Abstract

Barber, Jennifer S. 2001. "Ideational Influences on the Transition to Parenthood: Attitudes Towards Childbearing and Competing Alternatives." Social Psychology Quarterly, 64(2): 101-127.

In this paper I propose an expansion of the theory of planned behavior that considers how attitudes toward competing behaviors affect a focal behavior. Specifically, I explore how attitudes toward childbearing and the competing behaviors of educational attainment, career development, and consumer spending affect childbearing behavior. The empirical analyses use data from an eight-wave longitudinal study of mother-child pairs, the Intergenerational Panel Study of Parents and Children. The results indicate that positive attitudes toward children and childbearing increase rates of marital childbearing, while positive attitudes toward careers and luxury goods reduce rates of premarital childbearing. I conclude that theories and models of the attitude-behavior relationship should be expanded to include attitudes toward competing behaviors, and that social scientists who study childbearing behavior would benefit from greater emphasis on social psychological explanations of behavior.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next