Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Clinton's and Trump's appeal to voters viewed from perspective of Neidert and Lesthaeghe's SDT framework

Stephenson assessing in-home HIV testing and counseling for male couples

Thompson says mass incarceration causes collapse of Detroit neighborhoods

Highlights

Susan Murphy elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Maggie Levenstein named director of ISR's Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research

Arline Geronimus receives 2016 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award

PSC spring 2016 newsletter: Kristin Seefeldt, Brady West, newly funded projects, ISR Runs for Bob, and more

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Sioban D. Harlow photo

Risk Factors for Pre-Eclampsia among Working Women in Mexico

Publication Abstract

Harlow, Sioban D., P. Ceron-Mireles, R.M. Nunez-Urquiza, and C. Sanchez-Carrillo. 2001. "Risk Factors for Pre-Eclampsia among Working Women in Mexico." Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology, 15(1): 40-46.

This study examined risk factors for pre-eclampsia/eclampsia in a population-based sample of pregnant working women in Mexico City. Over a 3-month period, all women who gave birth at three major hospitals and who had worked for at least 3 months during pregnancy were interviewed. After excluding mothers with multiple gestations or infants with birth defects, and previous diagnoses of hypertension, chronic renal disease or diabetes, 131 of 2436 women (5.4%) had been diagnosed with pre-eclampsia and/or eclampsia. The frequency was much higher among women of low socio-economic status: 12% of uninsured women (SSA) compared with 4.2% of private sector employees (IMSS) and 1.3% of public sector employees (ISSSTE). After adjusting for education, women working in services (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.01, 2.81) and in retail (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.18, 3.37), primiparae (OR = 2.64, 95% CI = 1.65, 4.21) and women whose pregestational weight was 55 kg (OR = 2.02, 95% CI = 1.34, 3.04) were at increased risk. Efforts to develop and evaluate intervention programmes should target hospitals serving the uninsured (SSA) if reduction in the number of preventable maternal deaths in Mexico is to be achieved. Such programmes should also target service and retail workers and identify women with poor glycaemic control early in pregnancy.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next