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Almirall says comparing SMART designs will increase treatment quality for children with autism

Thompson says America must "unchoose" policies that have led to mass incarceration

Alter says lack of access to administrative data is "big drag on research"


Susan Murphy to speak at U-M kickoff for data science initiative, Oct 6, Rackham

Andrew Goodman-Bacon, former trainee, wins 2015 Nevins Prize for best dissertation in economic history

Deirdre Bloome wins ASA award for work on racial inequality and intergenerational transmission

Bob Willis awarded 2015 Jacob Mincer Award for Lifetime Contributions to the Field of Labor Economics

Next Brown Bag

Monday, Oct 12 at noon, 6050 ISR
Joe Grengs: Policy & planning for transportation equity

Robert F. Schoeni photo

Persistent, Consistent, Widespread and Robust? Another Look at Trends in Old-Age Disability.

Publication Abstract

Schoeni, Robert F., Viki Freedman, and Robert Wallace. 2001. "Persistent, Consistent, Widespread and Robust? Another Look at Trends in Old-Age Disability." Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological and Social Sciences, 56(4): S206-S218.

Objective. The purpose of this study was to provide new evidence on disability trends among elderly persons from 1982 to 1996. Methods. The sample includes 125,949 participants aged 70 and older in the 1982-1996 National Health Interview Surveys. Logistic analysis was used to estimate the trend in disability prevalence after controlling for various sociodemographic factors. Results. We found that: (a) the prevalence of disability has declined, but the gains did not persist throughout the entire period or accelerate over time: (b) only routine care disability has declined. whereas more severe personal care disability shows no improvements; (c) estimates are robust to the exclusion of the nursing home population but may be sensitive to growth in the assisted living population: (d) estimates of decline in disability prevalence are fairly consistent across five national surveys: (e) gains have been concentrated among the most educated elderly persons: and (F) gains in education appear to be an important confounder of the improvements. Discussion. Evidence from several surveys using various measures indicate that disability has declined among elderly persons. Determining the causes of the improvements should be a high priority in future research efforts.

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