Home > Publications . Search All . Browse All . Country . Browse PSC Pubs . PSC Report Series

PSC In The News

RSS Feed icon

Do universities need more conservative thinkers?

Geronimus says black-white differences in mortality "help silence black voices in the electorate"

Starr critical of risk assessment scores for sentencing

Highlights

Presentation on multilevel modeling using Stata, July 26th, noon, 6050 ISR

Frey's new report explores how the changing US electorate could shape the next 5 presidential elections, 2016 to 2032

U-M's Data Science Initiative offers expanded consulting services via CSCAR

Elizabeth Bruch promoted to Associate Professor

Next Brown Bag

PSC Brown Bags
will resume fall 2016

Robert F. Schoeni photo

Social Security, Economic Growth and the Rise of the Elderly Widows' Independence in the Twentieth Century.

Publication Abstract

Schoeni, Robert F., and Kathleen McGarry. 2000. "Social Security, Economic Growth and the Rise of the Elderly Widows' Independence in the Twentieth Century." Demography, 37(2): 221-36.

The percentage of elderly widows living alone rose from 18% in 1940 to 62% in 1990, while the percentage living with adult children declined from 59% to 20%. This study finds that income growth, particularly increased Social Security benefits, was the single most important determinant of living arrangements, accounting for nearly one-half of the increase in independent living. Unlike researchers in earlier studies, no evidence is found that the effect of income became stronger over the period. Changes in age, race, immigrant status, schooling and completed fertility explain a relatively small share of the changes in living arrangements.

Browse | Search : All Pubs | Next